F
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Frank W. Davis, Chair, is professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research interests are in landscape ecology and conservation planning. Dr. Davis’ current research focuses on the landscape ecology of California plant communities; the design and monitoring of protected-area networks; multi-objective planning tools for rangeland and farmland conservation; and the biological implications of regional climate change in the western United States. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow in the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, and a trustee of the Nature Conservancy of California. Dr. Davis has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees, starting with the Committee on the Formation of the National Biological Survey in 1993. He served from 1999 to 2004 on the NRC’s Committee on the Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and since 2006 on the Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He earned a B.A. in biology from Williams College in 1975 and a Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1982.


Steven R. Beissinger holds the A. Starker Leopold Chair of Wildlife Biology and is a professor of conservation biology in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley. He also serves as chair of the Ecosystem Sciences Division and the department. Dr. Beissinger conducts research on conservation biology, behavioral ecology, and population biology. His research primarily focuses on birds but has also included work with plants, mammals, and aquatic invertebrates. Dr. Beissinger’s current work focuses mainly on (1) field studies of the ecology, demography, and monitoring of endangered or exploited species; (2) demographic models of population viability and recovery; and (3) field studies of parental care strategies and mating systems. He has worked extensively with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and state agencies as



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F Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Frank W. Davis, Chair, is professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research interests are in landscape ecology and conservation planning. Dr. Davis’ cur- rent research focuses on the landscape ecology of California plant communities; the design and monitoring of protected-area networks; multi-objective planning tools for rangeland and farmland conservation; and the biological implications of regional climate change in the western United States. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow in the Aldo Leo- pold Leadership Program, and a trustee of the Nature Conservancy of California. Dr. Davis has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees, starting with the Committee on the Formation of the National Biological Survey in 1993. He served from 1999 to 2004 on the NRC’s Committee on the Restora- tion of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and since 2006 on the Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He earned a B.A. in biology from Williams College in 1975 and a Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1982. Steven R. Beissinger holds the A. Starker Leopold Chair of Wildlife Biology and is a professor of conservation biology in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley. He also serves as chair of the Ecosystem Sciences Division and the department. Dr. Beissinger conducts research on conservation biology, behavioral ecology, and population biology. His research primarily focuses on birds but has also included work with plants, mammals, and aquatic invertebrates. Dr. Beissinger’s current work focuses mainly on (1) field studies of the ecology, demography, and monitoring of endangered or exploited species; (2) demographic models of population viability and recovery; and (3) field studies of parental care strategies and mating systems. He has worked extensively with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and state agencies as 305

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306 Appendix F a member of federal endangered recovery teams, as a contractor to conduct research on endangered species and to develop regional monitoring plans, and as a training instructor. He served on the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. Dr. Beissinger earned his B.S. and M.S. in zoology at Miami University and his Ph.D. in natural resource ecology at the University of Michigan. William G. Boggess is professor and head of the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Oregon State University (OSU). He also serves as the president of the OSU Faculty Senate. Prior to joining OSU, Dr. Boggess spent 16 years on the faculty at the University of Florida in the Food and Resource Eco- nomics Department where he was involved with Everglades work. His research interests include interactions between agriculture and the environment (e.g., water allocation, groundwater contamination, surface-water pollution, sustain- able systems, water and environmental policy); economic dimensions and indi- cators of ecosystem health; and applications of real options to environmental and natural resources. Dr. Boggess currently serves on the Oregon Governor’s Council of Economic Advisors, the Board of Directors of the American Agri- cultural Economics Association, and is the immediate past-chair of the Food Alliance. He also recently served on the State of Oregon Environment Report Science Panel and has been active in the design and assessment of the Oregon Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program. Dr. Boggess served as a member of the NRC Committee on the Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater Effluents and Sludge in the Production of Crops for Human Consumption, and on the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 1979. Charles T. Driscoll (NAE) is university professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University where he also serves as the director of the Center for Environmental Systems Engineering. His teaching and research interests are in the area of environmental chemistry, biogeochemistry, and environmental quality modeling. A principal research focus has been the response of forest, aquatic, and coastal ecosystems to disturbance, includ - ing air pollution, land use change, and elevated inputs of nutrients and mer- cury. Dr. Driscoll is currently the principal investigator of the National Science Foundation’s Long Term Ecological Research Network’s project at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was a member of the NRC’s Panel on Process of Lake Acidification, the Committee on the Collaborative Large-scale Engineer- ing Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER), and the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress.

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Appendix F 307 Dr. Driscoll received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Maine and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Cornell University. Joan G. Ehrenfeld is a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources at Rutgers University and served as the director of the New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute, a federally funded program of water- related research and outreach, from 1990 until 2010. Her research is in the area of wetland ecology and ecosystems ecology and focuses on plant-soil interactions. Dr. Ehrenfeld’s current research includes studies of the interactions of exotic invasive plants and forest soils, nitrogen cycling in forested wetlands affected by urbanization, the role of wetland diversity in the ecology of West Nile Virus, carbon accumulation in wetlands, and connectivity along urban rivers. Dr. Ehrenfeld served as a member of the Committee on Assessment of Water Resources Research, the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, and two terms on the Water Science and Technology Board. She is a fellow of the Society of Wetland Scientists and serves as a member of the Ecological Processes and Effects Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board and several New Jersey state advisory boards. She received her B.A. in biology from Columbia University, her M.A. in biology from Harvard University, and her Ph.D. in biol- ogy from City University of New York. William L. Graf is Foundation University Professor and professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. His expertise is in fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. Dr. Graf’s research and teaching have focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river processes, morphology, and ecology, along with con- taminant transport and storage in river systems. His present work emphasizes the downstream effects of dams on rivers. In the arena of public policy, he has emphasized the interaction of science and decision making, and the resolution of conflicts among economic development, historical preservation, and environ- mental restoration for rivers. Dr. Graf has served as member of the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, the Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative, the Committee on Res- toration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, and as a member of the first and chair of the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He is also a national associate of the National Academies. Dr. Graf earned a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1974. Wendy D. Graham is the Carl S. Swisher Eminent Scholar in Water Resources in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University

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308 Appendix F of Florida and director of the University of Florida Water Institute. Her research is focused on coupled hydrologic-water quality-ecosystem modeling; water resources evaluation and remediation; evaluation of impacts of agricultural production on surface- and groundwater quality; and development of hydro- logic indicators of ecosystem status. She has previous NRC committee experi- ence, having served on the Committee on Seeing Into the Earth: Non-Invasive Techniques for Characterization of the Shallow Subsurface for Environmental Engineering Applications. Dr. Graham received her B.S.E. in environmental engineering from the University of Florida and her Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Chris T. Hendrickson is the Duquesne Light Company Professor of Engineering and codirector of the Green Design Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. His research, teaching, and consulting are in the general area of engineering planning and management, including design for the environment, system per- formance, project management, finance, and computer applications. Dr. Hen- drickson’s current research projects include environmental life-cycle assessment methodology development, heavy metal material flow analysis, infrastructure requirements for alternative transportation fuels, and sustainable infrastructure. He has served on several NRC committees including the first and second Com- mittees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, the Committee on Assessing the Results of External Independent Reviews for U.S. Department of Energy Projects, and the Committee for Review of the Project Management Practices Employed on the Boston Central Artery (“Big Dig”) Proj- ect. Dr. Hendrickson holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from Stanford University, a master of philosophy degree in economics from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. William P. Horn is a partner in the law firm of Birch, Horton, Bittner and Cherot in Washington, DC. Prior to entering private practice, Mr. Horn served in a vari- ety of congressional and executive posts including as assistant secretary of the interior for fish, wildlife, and parks, and as deputy under secretary of the interior with responsibilities for western water rights negotiations, international fishery negotiations, and Alaska programs. He specializes in natural resources law and has expertise in land acquisition and appraisal, wildlife law including the Endan- gered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, National Park concessions, Forest Service matters, recreational permits, and other public land and related regulatory matters. Mr. Horn served on the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress and is a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, and the Bar of the District of Columbia. Mr. Horn is a recipient of the Department of the Interior’s Outstand-

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Appendix F 309 ing Services Award and the International Academy of Trial Lawyers Advocacy Award. He earned his J.D. in 1983 from American University. David H. Moreau is chair of the curriculum and research professor in the Depart- ment of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests include analysis, planning, financing, and evaluation of water resource and related environmental programs. Dr. Moreau is engaged in water resources planning at the local, state, and national levels. He has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Projects, the Committee to Review the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Studies, and the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, and he is a current member of the Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Moreau serves as chairman of the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission, the state’s regulatory commission for water quality, air quality, and water allocation. He received his B.S. and M.S. from Mississippi State University and North Carolina State Uni- versity, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. K. Ramesh Reddy is graduate research professor and chair of the Department of Soil and Water Science at the University of Florida. His research areas include soil quality, ecological indicators, wetlands, and aquatic systems. Dr. Reddy investigates biogeochemical cycling of nutrients (including redox-related pro- cesses) in natural ecosystems, including wetlands, shallow lakes, estuaries, and constructed wetlands and develops biogeochemical indicators to evaluate changes in ecosystem functions. He is a member of the U.S. National Com- mittee for Soil Sciences in the National Academy’s Policy and Global Affairs Division. He served as a member of the second Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. Dr. Reddy earned his Ph.D. in agronomy and soil science from Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College in 1976. R. Wayne Skaggs (NAE) is the William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Univer- sity Professor in the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering at North Carolina State University. His primary areas of interest are in the field of agricultural drainage, water management, drainage water quality, and wetland hydrology. He has developed the DRAINMOD suite of models to describe the hydrology of poorly drained soils (including wetlands) and the performance of drainage, controlled drainage and subirrigation systems on those soils; to predict the effect of drainage and related water management system design on losses of nitrogen, sediment, and phosphorus from agricultural fields; to consider the hydrology of watershed-scale rather than field-scale systems; to quantify the

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310 Appendix F hydrology of forested watersheds; and to predict soil salinity and the effect of water management practices on it. Dr. Skaggs is a member of the National Acad- emy of Engineering and is a past president of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers. He received his B.S. and M.S. in agricultural engineering from the University of Kentucky and his Ph.D. in agricultural engineering from Purdue University, and he is a certified professional engineer. Robert R. Twilley is the director of the wetland biogeochemistry program and professor in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science at Louisiana State University. His primary expertise is in systems ecology and biogeochemistry of coastal wetlands both in the Gulf of Mexico and throughout Latin America, and through this research he has tried to develop fundamentals of ecosystem science by describing biogeochemical processes (denitrification, nutrient burial, benthic nutrient fluxes) that determine the function of coastal ecosystems as either a source or sink of primary nutrients to near shore environments. Dr. Twil- ley has also spent a large part of his career determining the role of mangroves in the fate of carbon and nutrients in tropical estuaries. His current research focuses on developing ecosystem models, both conceptual and simulation, to forecast the rehabilitation of coastal and wetland ecosystems. He is a member of the Louisiana Framework Development Team that is developing a comprehensive restoration plan for the Louisiana Coastal Area and is active in the Estuarine Research Federation. He was also the co-author of a 2002 report by the Pew Center for Global Climate Change titled Coastal and Marine Ecosystems and Global Climate Change. Dr. Twilley received his B.S. and M.S. in biology from East Carolina University and his Ph.D. in plant ecology/systems ecology from the University of Florida. STAFF Stephanie E. Johnson, study director, is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 2002, she has served as study director for seven committees, including the Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative and the Committee on Advancing Desalination Tech- nology Research. She has also worked on NRC studies on contaminant source remediation, the disposal of coal combustion wastes, and water security. Dr. Johnson received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia on the subject of pesticide transport and microbial bioavailability in soils. David J. Policansky is a scholar in the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He earned a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Oregon. Dr.

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Appendix F 311 Policansky has directed approximately 35 NRC studies, and his areas of expertise include genetics; evolution; ecology, including fishery biology; natural resource management; and the use of science in policy making. Michael J. Stoever is a research associate with the Water Science and Technol- ogy Board. He has worked on a number of studies including Desalination: A National Perspective, the Water Implications of Biofuels Production in the United States, and the Committee on Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration. He has also worked on NRC studies on the WATERS Network, the effect of water withdrawals on the St. Johns River, and Chesapeake Bay restoration. Mr. Stoever received his B.A. degree in political science from The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey in Pomona, New Jersey.

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