AGENDA ITEM 1.19: SOFTWARE-DEFINED RADIO AND COGNITIVE RADIO SYSTEMS

To consider regulatory measures and their relevance, in order to enable the introduction of software-defined radio and cognitive radio systems, based on the results of ITU R studies, in accordance with Resolution 956 (WRC 07).

Resolution 956 (WRC-07), the impetus for WRC Agenda Item 1.19, considers implementation of software-defined and cognitive radio technologies.

The primary concern with respect to this item is that any changes to spectrum regulation to implement these technologies must account for the unique requirements of RAS and EESS. RAS and EESS are receive-only services that require consistently and extraordinary low levels of interference in order to function productively;1 these requirements are documented in multiple ITU Recommendations.2

Recommendation: Any modification to existing methods of allocating or managing spectrum should not result in higher levels or additional instances of harmful interference in spectrum already allocated for Radio Astronomy Service and Earth Exploration-Satellite Service.

Recommendation: Great care should be taken prior to enactment of new regulations in order to ensure that new uses of spectrum—especially those in frequencies adjacent to or harmonically-related to existing Radio Astronomy Service (RAS) or Earth Exploration-Satellite Service (EESS) allocations—do not result in increased levels of interference to RAS or EESS through unwanted emission.

Recommendation: Representatives of the Radio Astronomy Service and Earth Exploration-Satellite Service spectrum management communities should be included in deliberations that might lead to the establishment of universal “beacon” or “pilot” channels, “dynamic databases,” and other technologies intended to facilitate “dynamic spectrum access” or dynamic changes in other emission characteristics including modulation type, bandwidth, and power levels.

As noted in Resolution 956 (WRC-07), RAS and EESS facilities do not transmit, thus it is impossible for a radio system to discover these users of the spectrum without additional means. Engagement of the RAS and EESS communities early in the development of these technologies (and associated regulatory developments) will be important to identify these additional means, and will also increase the chances of identifying mutually-beneficial solutions.

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1 National Research Council, Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2010, pp. 79-90.

2 See ITU-R Recommendation RA-769; ITU-R Recommendation RS-1029; and other Recommendations are given in National Research Council, Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2010, pp. 105-108.



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