is important to preserve portions of the spectrum to allow this fundamental information to be measured.”1,2,3,4

Preservation of access to faint, naturally occurring signals found in the terrestrial and astrophysical environments through formal recognition of the passive observing services remains a vital role of humanity, through the ITU.

Conclusion: Earth observation using radiocommunication frequencies has become a key means to understand the effects of changes in both the natural and artificial environment, and to provide information for effective decision-making and resource management in many areas of society and life. In addition, Earth science and observation technology have economic benefits, both in job creation and in early warning of potentially disastrous and disruptive situations. These benefits will continue, and increase as technology pushes humankind’s understanding of its environment even further.

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1 National Research Council, Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2010, pp. 26.

2 See also National Research Council, Spectrum Management for Science in the 21st Century, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2010, pp. 90-105.

3 National Research Council, Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2010, pp. 26.

4 See also National Research Council, Spectrum Management for Science in the 21st Century, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2010, pp. 90-105.



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