Appendix B
Workshop Background

WORKSHOP STATEMENT OF TASK

The 2009 report A New Biology for the 21st Century offered a vision that enables powerful advances in the life sciences to provide solutions to major global problems. As part of the follow-on activities stemming from the report, the Board on Life Sciences plans to organize a series of workshops to provide concrete examples of how the life sciences could contribute to addressing these grand challenges.


For the first of these, an ad hoc committee will organize a public workshop on meeting the intertwined challenges of increasing food and energy resources in a context of environmental stress, in which participants will:

  • Identify a small number of concrete problems for the New Biology to solve—problems that are important and urgent (and therefore inspirational), intractable with current knowledge and technology, but perhaps solvable in a decade.

  • Identify the knowledge gaps that would need to be filled to achieve those goals.

  • Identify conceptual and technological advances essential to achieve those goals.



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Appendix B Workshop Background WORKSHOP STATEMENT OF TASK The 2009 report A New Biology for the 21st Century offered a vision that enables powerful advances in the life sciences to provide solutions to major global problems. As part of the follow-on activities stemming from the report, the Board on Life Sciences plans to organize a series of workshops to provide concrete examples of how the life sciences could contribute to addressing these grand challenges. For the first of these, an ad hoc committee will organize a public workshop on meeting the intertwined challenges of increasing food and energy resources in a context of environmental stress, in which partici- pants will: • Identify a small number of concrete problems for the New Biology to solve—problems that are important and urgent (and therefore inspira- tional), intractable with current knowledge and technology, but perhaps solvable in a decade. • Identify the knowledge gaps that would need to be filled to achieve those goals. • Identify conceptual and technological advances essential to achieve those goals. 

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 APPENDIX B MEETING AGENDA IMPLEMENTING THE NEW BIOLOGY: DECADAL CHALLENGES LINKING FOOD, ENERGY, AND THE ENVIRONMENT Board on Life Sciences, National Research Council Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) 4000 Jones Bridge Road • Chevy Chase, MD 20815 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010 6:00 p.m. Light buffet dinner for participants who will be arriving early [Rathskeller Lounge] THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010 8:00 a.m. Breakfast available until 9:30 a.m. [Small Dining Room] 10:00 a.m. Plenary #1: Welcome to HHMI; Introduction to Workshop [Small Auditorium] Chair: Robert Tjian, President, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Uniersity of California, Berkeley • eith Yamamoto, Chair, Board on Life Sciences, National K Research Council; Professor of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology and Executie Vice Dean, School of Medicine, Uniersity of California, San Francisco • oger Beachy, Director, National Institute of Food and R Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture • teven Koonin, Under Secretary for Science, U.S. S Department of Energy 10:30 a.m. “Elevator” Talks [Small Auditorium] • ach participant will have three minutes to present his E or her transformative idea 12:00 p.m. Breakout #1 (in assigned small groups) during lunch [See breakout group assignment and locations] • Discuss elevator talks

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 APPENDIX B • hoose top three Big Ideas from elevator talks or C develop new transformative ideas by combining, refining, and building on elevator talks, or de novo • Place each idea on the New Biology quadrant • For each idea, explain the following: o Degree of risk or likelihood of success o hy it requires cross-agency effort and why it W won’t happen any other way o hy it’s important: impact, if successful, on W agriculture, energy, environment, health 2:15 p.m. Break 2:30 p.m. Plenary #2: Prioritization [Small Auditorium] • Breakout group progress reports • Plenary Discussion: prioritize o Refine and perhaps begin to cluster ideas Initial brainstorming on cross-cutting knowledge o areas and technologies or shared resources that might contribute to multiple “decadal challenges” 4:00 p.m. Breakout #2 [See breakout group assignments and locations] • egin to identify the “decadal-level” research B problems and questions that investigators could address in order to achieve them • Questions include the following: o hat is needed in terms of basic knowledge, new W technologies, and infrastructure? o What other fields need to be involved? o hat educational programs are needed to produce W the right kinds of researchers? • onsideration of timing, sequence, and interactions C among ideas 5:30 p.m. Break 6:15 p.m. Dinner (in mixed groups) [Small Dining Room] • epresentative from each group should brief dinner R companions on the day’s discussions; scribes take notes 8:00 p.m. Continued interactions and discussion [Rathskeller Lounge] Steering committee meeting with rapporteurs

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8 APPENDIX B FRIDAY, JUNE 4, 2010 7:30 a.m. Breakfast available until 8:30 a.m. [Small Dining Room] 8:30 a.m. Plenary #3: Development of Decadal-Level Agenda [Small Auditorium] • Reports of dinner discussions • Development of master chart • Organization of Breakout #3 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. Breakout #3 (as determined in plenary #3) [Rooms N-10, N-28, S-221] 11:30 a.m. Plenary #4: Small-Group Breakout Reports [Small Auditorium] 12:30 p.m. Lunch (Steering committee and rapporteurs meet again) [Small Dining Room] 1:30 p.m. Breakout #4: Gap Filling (as determined over lunch) [Rooms N-10, N-28, S-221] • oal is to capture all ideas: the resulting workshop G report will include only ideas discussed at the workshop 2:30 p.m. Final Plenary [Small Auditorium] • dentify immediate priorities: top five actions that I need to happen in the next year • etting the message out: brainstorming on how G participants can continue to be involved in the New Biology effort 3:30 p.m. Adjourn Direct and in-kind support for the workshop has been provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute. A New Biology for the 21st Century was supported by the National Insti- tutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Depart - ment of Energy.

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 APPENDIX B LIST OF PARTICIPANTS IMPLEMENTING THE NEW BIOLOGY: DECADAL CHALLENGES LINKING FOOD, ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT Board on Life Sciences, National Research Council June 3-4, 2010 • Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland Bonnie L. Bassler, Ph.D. Jeffery L. Dangl, Ph.D. HHMI Investigator John N. Couch Professor of Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology Biology University of North Carolina at Princeton University Chapel Hill Roger N. Beachy, Ph.D. Edward F. DeLong, Ph.D. Director Professor, Department of Civil & National Institute of Food and Environmental Engineering Agriculture and Division of Biological U.S. Department of Agriculture Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Edward S. Buckler, Ph.D. Agricultural Research Service U.S. Department of Agriculture; Joseph R. Ecker, Ph.D. and Adjunct Professor of Plant Professor, Plant Molecular and Breeding and Genetics Cellular Biology Laboratory Cornell University Salk Institute for Biological Studies Vicki L. Chandler, Ph.D. [planning committee] Sean R. Eddy, Ph.D. Chief Program Officer, Science Group Leader Gordon & Betty Moore Janelia Farm Research Campus Foundation; and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Regents’ Professor, Departments of Plant Sciences and Richard Flavell, Ph.D., FRS, CBE Molecular & Cellular Biology Chief Scientific Officer University of Arizona Ceres, Inc.

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0 APPENDIX B Rebecca J. Nelson, Ph.D. Jeffrey I. Gordon [planning Associate Professor, Departments committee] of Plant Pathology & Plant- Dr. Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Microbe Biology and Plant University Professor Breeding & Genetics Director, Center for Genome Cornell University; and Sciences Scientific Director, McKnight School of Medicine Foundation Collaborative Washington University in St. Louis Crop Research Program Steve A. Kay, Ph.D. Donald R. Ort, Ph.D. Dean, Division of Biological Professor of Plant Biology Sciences University of Illinois at Richard C. Atkinson Chair in the Urbana-Champaign; and Biological Sciences Photosynthesis Research Unit Professor, Cell and Developmental Agricultural Research Service Biology U.S. Department of Agriculture University of California, San Diego Ann H. Reid Director Steven E. Koonin, Ph.D. American Academy of Under Secretary for Science Microbiology U.S. Department of Energy American Society for Microbiology Stephen P. Long, Ph.D. Charles W. Rice, Ph.D. Robert Emerson Professor University Distinguished Departments of Plant Biology and Professor, Soil Microbiology Crop Sciences Department of Agronomy University of Illinois at Urbana- Kansas State University; and Champaign; and President-Elect, Soil Science Deputy Director Society of America Energy Biosciences Institute Martha Schlicher, Ph.D. James A. MacMahon, Ph.D. Bioenergy Lead Dean, College of Science Monsanto Company Trustee Professor, Department of Biology Director, Ecology Center Utah State University; and Chair, Board of Directors National Ecological Observatory Network, Inc.

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1 APPENDIX B Christopher R. Somerville, Ph.D. Gregory Stephanopoulos, Ph.D. [planning committee] Professor of Chemical Engineering Director Massachusetts Institute of Energy Biosciences Institute; and Technology Professor of Plant and Microbial Biology Julie A. Theriot, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley; HHMI Investigator and Associate Professor of Visiting Scientist Biochemistry and Lawrence Berkeley National Microbiology & Immunology Laboratory Stanford University Gary Stacey, Ph.D. Robert Tjian, Ph.D. Missouri Soybean Biotechnology President Professor in Functional Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Genomics and Integrated and Professor of Biochemistry Advanced Technologies and Molecular Biology Professor of Plant Sciences and University of California, Berkeley Joint Professor of Biochemistry Director, Center for Sustainable Keith Yamamoto, Ph.D. [planning Energy committee] University of Missouri; and Professor of Cellular and Associate Director, National Molecular Pharmacology Center for Soybean Executive Vice Dean, School of Biotechnology Medicine University of California, San Francisco AGENCY OBSERVERS Roland F. Hirsh, Ph.D. Lynn Hudson, Ph.D. Program Manager, Climate & Director Environmental Sciences Office of Science Policy Analysis Division Office of Science Policy Office of Biological & Office of the Director Environmental Research National Institutes of Health U.S. Department of Energy Tom Kalil Deputy Director for Policy Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President

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2 APPENDIX B Mary E. Maxon, Ph.D. Zeev Rosenzweig, Ph.D. Deputy Executive Director Program Officer President’s Council of Advisors Division of Chemistry on Science and Technology Directorate for Mathematical & (PCAST) Physical Sciences National Science Foundation Philip S. Perlman, Ph.D. Senior Scientific Officer Joann P. Roskoski, Ph.D. Director, Research Facilities Acting Assistant Director for Howard Hughes Medical Institute Biological Sciences National Science Foundation Carl D. Rhodes, Ph.D. Senior Scientific Officer Sharlene C. Weatherwax, Ph.D. Howard Hughes Medical Institute Director, Biological Systems Science Division Office of Biological & Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy NATIONAL ACADEMIES STAFF Lida Anestidou, D.V.M., Ph.D. Jo L. Husbands, Ph.D. (LAnestidou@nas.edu) (JHusbands@nas.edu) Senior Program Officer Scholar, Senior Project Director Institute for Laboratory Animal Board on Life Sciences Research National Research Council National Research Council Robin Schoen (RSchoen@nas.edu) Adam P. Fagen, Ph.D. (AFagen@ Director nas.edu) Board on Agriculture and Natural Senior Program Officer Resources Board on Life Sciences National Research Council National Research Council Frances E. Sharples, Ph.D. (FSharples@nas.edu) India Hook-Barnard, Ph.D. (IHook@nas.edu) Senior Director Program Officer Board on Life Sciences Board on Life Sciences National Research Council National Research Council Paula Tarnapol Whitacre (ptw@ fullcircle.org) Consultant Science Writer; and Principal Full Circle Communications, LLC