communities, states, and regions are engaging in innovative approaches that often extend beyond what the federal government requires. With respect to climate change, the National Research Council America’s Climate Choices project report on informing climate-related decisions emphasizes that the federal government should not attempt to preempt local climate-change mitigation and adaptation initiatives or stifle innovative programs (NRC, 2010a). But the report also indicates that the federal government can do much, particularly in providing information. The same may well be true for encouraging disaster-resilient communities, and many of the collaboration models and case studies provided in the climate change report can be useful in the context of disaster resilience-focused private–public collaboration. With these ideas in mind, communities can establish vertical ties and collaborative relationships with state- and national-level organizations and governments.

BUILDING AND OPERATING COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS: PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF THE CONCEPTUAL MODEL

Many local communities, business and professional organizations, and state and local agencies have broken new ground in creating self-governed, private–public partnerships to serve their constituencies, and examples of these are provided throughout this report. These partnerships provide a promising array of collaboration models and lessons learned. The committee recognizes the need for a national framework that will enable the development of community-based partnerships; however, until such a framework exists—with supporting policy and resources—there is intrinsic value in developing entrepreneurial partnership work at the state and community levels.

The benefits of establishing community and statewide private–public collaboration before a disaster strikes have been observed in recent years. Those seeking to build private–public collaboration in their own communities may wish to use existing efforts as models. For example, the Safeguard Iowa Partnership15 played a pivotal role during response to the historic 2008 floods in the midwestern United States; the Earthquake Country Alliance16 staged annual statewide earthquake drills in California17 and supports earthquake preparedness in multiple states and some other countries; the Aware and Prepare Program in Santa Barbara, California, is a private–public collaboration established by the Orfalea Foundation to increase the level of community disaster preparedness;18 and regional alliances have expanded their collaboration on economic issues to include disaster resilience.19 The

15

See www.safeguardiowa.org (accessed July 1, 2010).

16

See www.earthquakecountry.org/ (accessed July 30, 2010).

17

See www.ShakeOut.org/ (accessed July 30, 2010).

18

See www.orfaleafoundations.org/go/our-initiatives/aware-prepare/ (accessed July 1, 2010).

19

See www.pnwer.org (accessed July 1, 2010).



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