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Cartwright, N.L., and Bradburn, N.M. (2010). Measurement for science and policy. Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26.

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References Bohrnstedt, G.W. (2010). An overview of measurement in the social sciences. Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26. Cartwright, N.L., and Bradburn, N.M. (2010). Measurement for science and policy. Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26. Caspi, A., and Silva, P.A. (1995). Temperamental qualities at age 3 predict personality traits in young adulthood: Longitudinal evidence from a birth cohort. Child Development, 66, 486-498. Caspi, A., Gegg, D., Dickson, N., Harrington, H., Langley, J., Moffitt, T.E., and Silva, P.A. (1997). Personality differences predict health-risk behaviors in young adulthood: Evidence from a longitudinal study. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73, 1052-1063. Deaton, A., and Heston, A. (2010). Understanding PPPs and PPP-based national accounts. American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, 2(4), 1-35. Diewert, W.E., Greenlees, J.S., and Hulten, C.R. (2009). Price index concepts and measure- ment. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Duncan, O.D. (1961). A socioeconomic index for all occupations. In A.J. Reiss, Jr. (Ed.), Oc- cupations and Social Status (pp. 109-38). New York: Free Press. Duncan, O.D. (1984). Notes on social measurement: Historical and critical. New York: Rus- sell Sage Foundation. Erikson, R., and Goldthorpe, J.H. (1992). The constant flux: A study of class mobility in industrial societies. Oxford, Eng.: Clarendon Press. Fabricant, S. (1984). Toward a firmer basis of economic policy: The founding of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research. Available: http://www.nber.org/nberhistory/sfabricantrev.pdf [accessed July 2, 2010]. Fryback, D.G. (2010). Measuring health-related quality of life. Paper prepared for the Work- shop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. Na- tional Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26. 77

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78 THE IMPORTANCE OF COMMON METRICS Fryback, D.G., Palta, M., Cherepanov, D., Bolt, D., and Kim, J.S. (2010). Comparison of 5 health-related quality of life indexes using item response theory analysis. Medical Deci- sion Making, 30(1), 5-15. Ganzeboom, H.B., De Graaf, P.M., and Treiman, D.J. (1992). A standard international socio- economic index of occupational status. Social Science Research, 21, 1-56. Grusky, D.B., and Cumberworth, E. (2010). A national protocol for measuring intergenera- tional mobility? Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26. Guttman, L. (1950). The basis for scalogram analysis. In S. Stouffer et al. (Eds.), Measurement and prediction. The American Soldier Vol. IV. New York: Wiley. Hauser, R.M. (2010). Comparable metrics: Some examples. Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26. Hauser, R.M., Warren, J.R., Huang, M.-H., and Carter, W.Y. (2000). Occupational status, education, and social mobility in the meritocracy. In K. Arrow, S. Bowles, and S. Durlauf (Eds.), Meritocracy and economic inequality (pp. 179-229). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Heckman, J.J. (2006). Skill formation and the economics of investing in disadvantaged chil- dren. Science, 312, 1900-1902. Hollingshead, A.G. (1957). Two-factor index of social position. New Haven: Yale University Press. Hoyle, R.H., and Bradfield, E.K. (2010). Measurement and modeling of self-regulation: Is standardization a reasonable goal? Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Wash- ington, DC, February 25-26. King, G., Murray, C.J.L., Salomon, J.A., and Tandon, A. (2004). Enhancing the validity of cross-cultural comparability of survey research. American Political Science Review, 98, 191-207. Koopmans, T.C. (1947). Measurement without theory. Review of Economics and Statistics, 29(3), 161-172. Available at http://cowles.econ.yale.edu/P/cp/p00a/p0025a.pdf [accessed July 2, 2010]. McHorney, C.A. (1999). Health status assessment methods for adults: Past accomplishments and future challenges. Annual Review of Public Health, 20, 309-335. Michael, R.T. (2010). Measuring poverty: the question of standardization. Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26. Miech, R.A., and Hauser, R.M. (2001). Socioeconomic status (SES) and health at midlife: A comparison of educational attainment with occupation-based indicators. Annals of Epidemiology, 11, 75-84. Mischel, W., Shoda, Y., and Rodriguez, M.L. (1989). Delay of gratification in children. Sci- ence, 244, 933-938. Molla, M., Wagener, D.K., and Madans, J.H. (2001). Summary measures of population health: Methods for calculating health expectancy. Healthy People Statistical Notes No. 21. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. Mulgan, G. (2010). Advantages and disadvantages of the standardization of indicators used in policy. Paper prepared for the Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics. National Academies, Washington, DC, February 25-26. National Governors Association. (2008). Implementing graduation counts: State progress to date, 2008. Washington, DC: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices.

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