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Abedi, J., and Dietal, R. (2004). Challenges in the No Child Left Behind Act for English language learners. CRESST Policy Brief 7. Los Angeles: National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing.

Abrams L., and Haney, W. (2004). Accountability and the grade 9 to 10 translation: The impact on attrition and retention rates. In G. Orfield (Ed.), Dropouts in America: Confronting the graduation rate crisis (pp. 181-205). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Educational Publishing Group.

Achieve, Inc. (2008). Closing the expectations gap: An annual 50-state progress report on the alignment of high school policies with the demands of college and careers. Washington, DC: Author. Available: http://www.achieve.org/files/50-state-2009.pdf.

Alexander, K.L., Entwisle, D.R., and Dauber, S.L. (2003). On the success of failure: A reassessment of the effects of retention in the primary grades, 2nd ed. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press. Available: http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/samples/cam033/2002020180.pdf.

Allensworth, E.M. (1997). Earnings mobility of first and “1.5” generation Mexican-origin women and men: A comparison with U.S.-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. International Migration Review, 31(2), 386-410.

Allensworth, E.M. (2005a). Graduation and dropout trends in Chicago: A look at cohorts of students from 1991 through 2004. Chicago: Consortium on Chicago School Research. Available: http://www.consortium-chicago.org/publications/p75.html.

Allensworth, E.M. (2005b). Dropout rates after high-stakes testimony in elementary school: A study of the contradictory effects of Chicago’s efforts to end social promotion. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 27(4), 341-364.

Allensworth, E. (2008). Technical issues underlying dropout and completion indicators. Paper prepared for the workshop of the Committee on Improved Measurement of High School Dropout and Completion Rates: Expert Guidance on Next Steps for Research and Policy, National Research Council, Washington, DC, October 23-24. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bota/High_School_Dropouts_Workshop_Agenda.html.

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References and Bibliography Abedi, J., and Dietal, R. (2004). Challenges in the No Child Left Behind Act for English language learners. CRESST Policy Brief 7. Los Angeles: National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing. Abrams L., and Haney, W. (2004). Accountability and the grade 9 to 10 translation: The impact on attrition and retention rates. In G. Orfield (Ed.), Dropouts in America: Confronting the graduation rate crisis (pp. 181-205). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Educational Publishing Group. Achieve, Inc. (2008). Closing the expectations gap: An annual 50-state progress report on the align- ment of high school policies with the demands of college and careers. Washington, DC: Author. Available: http://www.achieve.org/files/50-state-2009.pdf. Alexander, K.L., Entwisle, D.R., and Dauber, S.L. (2003). On the success of failure: A reassessment of the effects of retention in the primary grades, 2nd ed. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge Univer- sity Press. Available: http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/samples/cam033/2002020180.pdf. Allensworth, E.M. (1997). Earnings mobility of first and “1.5” generation Mexican-origin women and men: A comparison with U.S.-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Inter- national Migration Review, 31(2), 386-410. Allensworth, E.M. (2005a). Graduation and dropout trends in Chicago: A look at cohorts of students from 1991 through 2004. Chicago: Consortium on Chicago School Research. Available: http:// www.consortium-chicago.org/publications/p75.html. Allensworth, E.M. (2005b). Dropout rates after high-stakes testimony in elementary school: A study of the contradictory effects of Chicago’s efforts to end social promotion. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 27(4), 341-364. Allensworth, E. (2008). Technical issues underlying dropout and completion indicators. Paper pre- pared for the workshop of the Committee on Improved Measurement of High School Drop- out and Completion Rates: Expert Guidance on Next Steps for Research and Policy, National Research Council, Washington, DC, October 23-24. Available: http://www7.nationalacad- emies.org/bota/High_School_Dropouts_Workshop_Agenda.html. Allensworth, E.M., and Easton, J.Q. (2005). The on-track indicator as a predictor of high school graduation. Chicago: Consortium on Chicago School Research. 119

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120 HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT, GRADUATION, AND COMPLETION RATES Allensworth, E.M., and Easton, J.O. (2007). What matters for staying on-track and graduating in Chicago public high schools. Chicago: Consortium on Chicago School Research. Available: http://www.all4ed.org/files/Allensworth.pdf. Alliance for Excellent Education. (2010). High schools in the United States: How does your local high school measure up? Available: http://www.all4ed.org/about_the_crisis/schools/state_and_ local_info/promotingpower [accessed July 2010]. Amos, J. (2008). Dropouts, diplomas, and dollars: U.S. high schools and the nation’s economy. Wash- ington, DC: Alliance for Excellent Education. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2008). Kids count data center. Available: http://datacenter.kidscount. org/. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2009). Kids count data center. Available: http://datacenter.kidscount. org/. Appleton, J., Christenson, S., Kim, D., and Reschley, A. (2006). Measuring cognitive and psycho- logical engagement: Validation of the Student Engagement Instrument. Journal of School Psychology, 44(5), 427-445. Balfanz, R. (2008). Early warning and intervention systems: Promise and challenges for policy and practice. Paper prepared for the workshop of the Committee on Improved Measurement of High School Dropout and Completion Rates: Expert Guidance on Next Steps for Research and Policy, National Research Council, Washington, DC, October 23-24. Available: http:// www7.nationalacademies.org/bota/High_School_Dropouts_Workshop_Agenda.html. Balfanz, R., and Legters, N. (2004). Locating the dropout crisis: Which high schools produce the nation’s dropouts? Where are they located? Who attends them? Baltimore: Center for Social Organization of Schools, Johns Hopkins University. Barro, S.M., and Kolstad, A. (1987). Who drops out of high school? Findings from high school and beyond. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Bartels, L.M. (2008). Unequal democracy: The political economy of the new gilded age. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Available: http://pacefunders.org/publications/NCBY.pdf. Belfield, C., and Levin, H. (Eds.) (2007). The price we pay: Economic and social consequences of inadequate education. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution. Berends, M., Bodilly, S.J., and Kirby, S.N. (2002). Facing the challenges of whole-school reform: New American schools after a decade. Santa Monica, CA: RAND. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. (2005). Data Quality Campaign: Using data to improve student achievement. Available: http://www.dataqualitycampaign.org/. Boesel, D., Alsalam, N., and Smith, T.M. (1998). Executive summary: Educational and labor mar- ket performance of GED recipients. NLE 98-2023a2. Washington, DC: National Library of Education. Bruce, W. (2008). Accounting for every student: Graduation rates in Indiana. A Hoosier horror study. Presentation prepared for the Committee on Improved Measurement of High School Dropout and Completion Rates: Expert Guidance on Next Steps for Research and Poli- cy, National Research Council, Washington, DC, October 23-24. Available: http://www7. nationalacademies.org/bota/High_School_Dropouts_Workshop_Agenda.html. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2008). National Longitudinal Surveys. Available: http://www.bls.gov/ nls/home.htm. California Department of Education. (2008). Statewide graduation rates. Available: http:// data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/CompletionRate/CompRate1.asp?cChoice=StGradRate &cYear=2006-07&level=State. Cameron, S.V., and Heckman, J.J. (1993). The nonequivalence of high school equivalents. Journal of Labor Economics 11(1), pt. 1, 1-27. Cataldi, E.F., Laird, J., and KewalRamani, A. (2009). High school dropout and completion rates in the United States: 2007. NCES 2009-064. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Available: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo. asp?pubid=2009064.

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