FIGURE 2-1 A 105-mm howitzer projectile. Some cartridges have been reconfigured and therefore will not have propellant in the box with the projectile. For those that still have propellant, there will be propelling charges in the box. SOURCE: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

FIGURE 2-1 A 105-mm howitzer projectile. Some cartridges have been reconfigured and therefore will not have propellant in the box with the projectile. For those that still have propellant, there will be propelling charges in the box. SOURCE: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

FIGURE 2-2 A 155-mm howitzer projectile. These projectiles have been separated from their propellant and stored. SOURCE: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

FIGURE 2-2 A 155-mm howitzer projectile. These projectiles have been separated from their propellant and stored. SOURCE: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

FIGURE 2-3 A 4.2-inch mortar cartridge. The 4.2-inch mortar cartridges will be reconfigured as will be the projectiles. Most 4.2-inch cartridges will also be defuzed. SOURCE: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

FIGURE 2-3 A 4.2-inch mortar cartridge. The 4.2-inch mortar cartridges will be reconfigured as will be the projectiles. Most 4.2-inch cartridges will also be defuzed. SOURCE: Adapted from U.S. Army, 1977.

of munitions in the MSM allows for round-the-clock operation at PCAPP. From the MSM, munitions will be moved to the unpack area in the enhanced reconfiguration building (second box in Figure 2-6). If the projectiles contain bursters,3 they will be moved to the reconfiguration room, where the bursters will be removed by the linear projectile and mortar disassembly (LPMD) machine (described later in this chapter) without disturbing the burster well that seals in the chemical agent. Uncontaminated energetics will be sent offsite for processing. Leaker and reject projectiles will be disposed of using an explosive destruction technology, without disassembling the munition (fifth box in Figure 2-6).4 The reconfigured projectiles (that is, those whose bursters have been removed) will then be transported robotically along a long corridor to the agent processing building in munition transfer carts.

3

A burster is an explosive charge, the purpose of which is to burst the munition casing and disperse the chemical agent within.

4

A leaker is a munition that has leaked. A reject is a munition that for any reason cannot be disassembled. These munitions will be destroyed by an explosive destruction technology without removing them from their outer protective overpack, reducing the risk of exposing personnel or the environment to agent. For more information on explosive destruction technology, see the NRC reports Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel (2006) and Assessment of Explosive Destruction Technologies for Specific Munitions at the Blue Grass and Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plants (2009). Both are available at http://www.nap.edu.



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