TABLE 2-3 Chemical Weapons Stockpile Stored at PCD

Munition

Agent Fill

Quantity

155-mm projectiles M110

HD

266,492

155-mm projectiles M104

HD

33,062

105-mm cartridge M60

HD

383,418

4.2-inch mortar M2A1

HD

76,722

4.2-inch mortar M2

HT

20,384

SOURCE: NRC, 2001.

constituent of the mustard hydrolysate and convert the hydrolysate compounds to water, carbon dioxide, and sludge that will contain compounds of chlorine and sulfur originating from the mustard (seventh box in Figure 2-6). It is also anticipated that this sludge will contain mercury owing to previous experience with the contamination of mustard agent with mercury at other stockpile sites that contained mustard agent. The Program Manager for Assembled Weapons Alternatives (PMACWA) is working on procedures to address the anticipated presence of mercury.

The projectile bodies are meanwhile placed in other trays and moved to the munitions treatment unit (sixth box in Figure 2-6), where they will be decontaminated at 1000°F for over 15 minutes before being released. The munitions treatment unit is a long muffle furnace with a conveyor that will slowly move projectile bodies from one end to the other as they are heated.

FIGURE 2-6 PCAPP process flow chart. SOURCE: Joe Novad, Deputy Program Manager, U.S. Army Element, Program Manager for ACWA, “PCAPP Overview,” presentation to the committee on June 14, 2010.

FIGURE 2-6 PCAPP process flow chart. SOURCE: Joe Novad, Deputy Program Manager, U.S. Army Element, Program Manager for ACWA, “PCAPP Overview,” presentation to the committee on June 14, 2010.



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