nership with and support from higher levels of management is essential for the success of these professionals. Examples of metrics for process safety competency are available from CCPS and can be tracked. In addition to tracking the proportion of positions key to process safety that are currently staffed, other metrics, such as completed process safety training and the enhancement of process safety competence for relevant personnel, such as managers, supervisors, and technical staff, can be utilized as well.

Although the practice of having safety professionals is not as widespread outside the chemical and petroleum industries, several other industries (nuclear power is one) and government facilities engaged in hazardous processes have also been hiring full-time staff members to develop and monitor their process safety programs. These individuals often participate in industry conferences in order to learn about the best practices being implemented by other companies, with the aim of sharing them with their own facilities and possibly implementing them there.

Process safety technology conferences such as the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’ annual Global Congress of Process Safety and other meetings hosted by organizations such as the CCPS and the Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center provide ongoing programming on process safety and the identification of best practices. The CCPS, the API, and the U.K. HSE documents discussed above would also provide a starting point for learning about industry best practices for process safety.


Finding 4-6. The chemical and petroleum industries have found it very beneficial to have employees on staff with process safety expertise. These individuals partner with senior management and are accountable for monitoring industry best practices in process safety and for implementing those that are applicable within their facilities. These individuals are also tasked with assisting in embedding process safety into the organization’s culture by organizing and leading grassroots process safety teams while reviewing outcomes and metrics with management.


Recommendation 4-6. The Program Manager for Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives should maintain process safety expertise at the programmatic level to ensure effective implementation of process safety metrics. To be successful, process safety experts must partner with and be supported by management.


Finding 4-7. There are a number of resources that the Program Manager for Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives can use to learn about best practices for process safety management in the chemical and petroleum industries. Process safety technology conferences such as the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’ annual Global Congress of Process Safety and others hosted by organizations such as the Center for Chemical Process Safety and the Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center provide ongoing programming on process safety and the identification of best practices.


Recommendation 4-7. The Program Manager for Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives should undertake a review of best practices in process safety management, especially in the chemical and petroleum industries. These practices are described in the Center for Chemical Process Safety book Guidelines for Risk Based Process Safety. Those that are applicable should be incorporated into the Pueblo and Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plants.

REFERENCES

API (American Petroleum Institute). 2010. Process Safety Performance Indicators for the Refining and Petrochemical Industries. American Petroleum Institute: Washington, D.C.

CCPS (Center for Chemical and Process Safety). 2008. Process Safety Leading and Lagging Metrics: You Don’t Improve What You Don’t Measure. New York, N.Y.: American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

CCPS. 2009. Guidelines for Process Safety Metrics. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

UK HSE (United Kingdom’s Health and Safety Executive). 2006. Developing Process Safety Indicators: A Step-by-Step Guide for Chemical and Major Hazard Industries. Health and Safety Guidance 254. Available online at http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/priced/hsg254.pdf. Last accessed March 11, 2011.



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