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Contributors

Ella Atkins is an associate professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan, where she is director of the Autonomous Aerospace Systems Lab. She has a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. She received a Ph.D. in computer science and engineering from the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the integration of strategic and tactical planning and optimization algorithms to enable robust operation in the presence of system failures and environmental uncertainties. A second research area is on optimization of and safety analysis in congested airspace.

http://aerospace.engin.umich.edu/people/faculty/atkins/


Luiz Andre Barroso is a distinguished engineer at Google Inc., where he has worked on a number of different areas, including cluster load balancing, finding related academic academic articles, failure analysis, RPC-level networking, server performance optimization, power provisioning, energy efficiency, and the design of Google’s computing platform. He received a Ph.D. in computer engineering from the University of Southern California.

http://www.barroso.org/


Stefan Bieniawski is a senior flight sciences research engineer at Boeing Research & Technology. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University. His research is in flight control systems design and analysis, focusing on multi-disciplinary, unconventional, and collaborative control concepts. He is principal investigator for multiple internal and external research programs on advanced guidance and flight controls technologies.



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Contributors Ella Atkins is an associate professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineer- ing at the University of Michigan, where she is director of the Autonomous Aerospace Systems Lab. She has a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. She received a Ph.D. in computer science and engineering from the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the integration of strategic and tactical planning and optimization algorithms to enable robust operation in the presence of system failures and environmental uncertainties. A second research area is on optimization of and safety analysis in congested airspace. http://aerospace.engin.umich.edu/people/faculty/atkins/ Luiz Andre Barroso is a distinguished engineer at Google Inc., where he has worked on a number of different areas, including cluster load balancing, finding related academic academic articles, failure analysis, RPC-level networking, server performance optimization, power provisioning, energy efficiency, and the design of Google’s computing platform. He received a Ph.D. in computer engineering from the University of Southern California. http://www.barroso.org/ Stefan Bieniawski is a senior flight sciences research engineer at Boeing Research & Technology. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University. His research is in flight control systems design and analysis, focusing on multi-disciplinary, unconventional, and collaborative control concepts. He is principal investigator for multiple internal and external research programs on advanced guidance and flight controls technologies. 11

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12 FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING Mark Campbell is an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineer- ing at Cornell University. He is also associate director for graduate affairs and director of graduate studies for mechanical engineering. He received a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Campbell is interested in control and autonomy for systems such as robotics, aircraft, and spacecraft. His research areas include autonomous robotics, human decision modeling, sensor fusion, non- linear and hybrid estimation theory, integrated estimation and control, formation flying satellites, and structural dynamics and control. http://www.mae.cornell.edu/index.cfm/page/fac/campbell.htm Elaine Chew is an associate professor of electrical and industrial and systems engi- neering, and music, at the University of Southern California and founder and direc- tor of the Music Computation and Cognition Lab where she conducts and directs research on music and computing. An operations researcher and pianist by training, her research activities aim to explain and demystify the phenomenon of music and its performance through the use of formal scientific methods. As a performer, she designs and curates concerts featuring interactive scientific music visualizations and collaborates with composers to present eclectic post-tonal music. Dr. Chew received a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. http://www-bcf.usc.edu/~echew Armando Fox is an adjunct associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and a co-founder of the Berkeley Reliable Adaptive Distributed Systems Laboratory. He received a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. His current research interests include applied statistical machine learning and cloud computing. He is a co- author of the recently released position paper, “Above the Clouds: A Berkeley View of Cloud Computing,” and has frequently lectured on this topic. http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Faculty/Homepages/fox.html Chad Frost is supervisor for autonomous systems and robotics in the Intelligent Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center, where his team develops and deploys technologies that will make aircraft safer, spacecraft more affordable, and robots smarter. He has degrees in aeronautical engineering from California Polytechnic State University. http://ti.arc.nasa.gov/tech/asr/ Henry Hess is an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineer- ing at Columbia University. He received a Ph.D. in physics from Free University Berlin. His research is in the areas of nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology, and engineering at the molecular scale, in particular the design of active nanosystems incorporating biomolecular motors, the study of active self-assembly, and the investigation of protein-resistant polymer coatings. http://www.bme.columbia.edu/fac-bios/hess/faculty.html

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1 CONTRIBUTORS Efrosini kokkoli is an associate professor in the Department of Chemical Engi- neering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota. She received a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research is in the rational design of novel biomimetic peptide-amphiphiles and aptamer-amphiphiles and their evaluation in different bionanotechnological appli- cations such as targeted delivery of therapeutics and functionalized biomaterials for tissue engineering. http://www.cems.umn.edu/about/people/faculty.php?id=2022 Bernard Meyerson is vice president for innovation at IBM and leads their Global University Relations function. He is also responsible for the IBM Academy, a self-governed organization of about 1,000 executives and senior technical leaders from across IBM. He is also a member of the CEO’s Integration and Values Team, the senior executive group integrating the business activities of IBM’s many disparate organizations and geographies. In 1992, Dr. Meyerson was appointed that year’s sole IBM Fellow, IBM’s highest technical honor, by IBM’s chairman. Dr. Meyerson is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and IEEE and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has received numerous technical and business awards for his work, which includethe Materials Research Society Medal, the Electrochemical Society Electronics Division Award, the IEEE Ernst Weber Award, the Electron Devices Society J. J. Ebers Award, and most recently the 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award from SEMI. Parthasarathy Ranganathan is a distinguished technologist at Hewlett Packard Labs. He received a Ph.D. from Rice University. His research interests are in systems architecture and management, power management and energy-efficiency, and systems modeling and evaluation. He is currently the principal investigator for the exascale datacenter project at HP Labs that seeks to design and manage next-generation servers and datacenters. http://www.hpl.hp.com/personal/Partha_Ranganathan/ Douglas Repetto is director of research at the Columbia University Computer Music Center. His work, including sculpture, installation, performance, record - ings, and software, is presented internationally. He is the founder of a number of art/community-oriented groups including dorkbot: people doing strange things with electricity, ArtBots: The Robot Talent Show, organism: making art with living systems, and the music-dsp mailing list and website. http://music.columbia.edu/~douglas Mostafa Ronaghi is senior vice president and chief technology officer at Illumina, where he is responsible for leading internal research programs and evaluating new technologies for the company, which applies innovative technologies to the analy- sis of genetic variation and function. He has founded four life science companies:

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1 FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING Avantome, NexBio, ParAllele Bioscience, and Pyrosequencing AB. He received a Ph.D. from the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. http://investor.illumina.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=12112&p=irol-govBio&ID=112 Daniel Trueman is an associate professor of music at Princeton University as well as a composer and performer. He is co-founder and director of the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, an ensemble of laptop-ists with 6-channel spherical speakers and various control devices. He has been active as an experimental instrument designer and has built spherical speakers and the Bowed-Sensor-Speaker Array, among other things. He studied physics at Carleton College, composition and theory at the College Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati, and composition at Princeton University. http://silvertone.princeton.edu/~dan/ Brian Whitman is co-founder and chief technical officer of The Echo Nest Corporation, a music intelligence company that automatically reads about and listens to the entire world of music for developers to build search, personalization, and interactive music applications. His research links community knowledge of music to its acoustic properties to learn the meaning of music. He received a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. www.the.echonest.com Yuanyuan Zhou is Qualcomm Chair Professor in the Department of Com - puter Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego and co-founder and CTO of Patterninsight, which was spun off from her research group. She received a Ph.D. from Princeton University. Her research focuses on next-generation computing issues, including energy and thermal management for datacenters, software dependability, and storage systems. http://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~yyzhou