also present the opportunity to adopt modern-day approaches to solving the complex problems inherent to space exploration. The programmatic conclusions in this report are intended as a guide to restore research activities to a level of excellence that will ensure that NASA remains the undisputed international leader of life and physical sciences research that enables future space exploration and advances fundamental scientific discovery.

REFERENCES

1. National Research Council. 2003. Assessment of Directions in Microgravity and Physical Sciences Research at NASA. The National Academies Press, Washington D.C.

2. Tomko, D.L., NASA. 2009. “History of Life and Physical Sciences Research Programs at NASA,” presentation to the Committee for the Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space, May 6. National Research Council, Washington, D.C.

3. Souza, K., G. Etheridge, and P.X. Callahan, eds. 2000. Post-1995 missions and payloads. Chapter 5 in Life into Space: Space Life Sciences Experiments. Ames Research Center, Kennedy Space Center, 1991-1998. NASA SP-2000-534. NASA, Washington D.C.

4. Department of Health and Human Services. Office for Human Research Protections. Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects. Available at http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/policy/common.html.

5. National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958.

6. Institute of Medicine. 2001. Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions. National Academy Press, Washington D.C.

7. National Research Council. 1998. A Strategy for Research in Space Biology and Medicine in the New Century. National Academy Press, Washington D.C.

8. Institute of Medicine. 2001. Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions. National Academy Press, Washington D.C.

9. For more information see Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Human Research Protections, Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections, Charter, available at http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/sachrp/charter/index.html.

10. NIH Record. 2007. NIH, NASA Partner for Health Research in Space. Volume LIX, No. 21, October 19. Available at http://nihrecord.od.nih.gov/newsletters/2007/10_19_2007/story1.htm.

11. Memorandum of Understanding between the National Institutes of Health and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for Cooperation in Space-Related Health Research. See http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/NIH_NASA_Activities/nih_nasa_mou.asp.

12. National Research Council. 1998. A Strategy for Research in Space Biology and Medicine in the New Century. National Academy Press, Washington D.C.

13. NASA/Brookhaven National Laboratory Space Radiation Program. Space Radiobiology. Available at http://www.bnl.gov/medical/nasa/LTSF.asp.

14. National Research Council. 2005. Accelerating Technology Transition: Bridging the Valley of Death for Materials and Processes in Defense Systems. The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.

15. National Institutes of Health. National Human Genome Research Institute. Research Funding. The ENCODE Project: Encyclopedia of DNA Elements. Available at http://www.genome.gov/ENCODE/.

16. National Research Council. 1998. A Strategy for Research in Space Biology and Medicine in the New Century. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

17. National Research Council. 2000. Review of NASA’s Biomedical Research Program. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

18. National Research Council and National Academy of Public Administration. 2003. Factors Affecting the Utilization of the International Space Station for Research in the Biological and Physical Sciences. The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.

19. Institute of Medicine. 2007. Review of NASA’s Space Flight Health Standards-Setting Process: Letter Report. The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.

20. Institute of Medicine. Safe Passage: Astronaut Care for Exploration Missions. National Academy Press, Washington D.C., p. 71.

21. NASA Johnson Space Center. Life Sciences Data Repositories. NASA Human Research Program. Available at http://lsda.jsc.nasa.gov/lsda_home.cfm.



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