FIGURE 4.1 Overview of the needed technical components of a combustion cyberinfrastructure (CI), which will facilitate rapid data flow and improved coordination among various subcommunities contributing to research and development (R&D) in the areas of engines and fuels.

FIGURE 4.1 Overview of the needed technical components of a combustion cyberinfrastructure (CI), which will facilitate rapid data flow and improved coordination among various subcommunities contributing to research and development (R&D) in the areas of engines and fuels.

ous conditions. In this research area, which is dominated by chemists, information is usually organized by molecule. These data are being generated at a relatively slow rate by a very large number of researchers in a variety of disciplines scattered around the world. Much of the data has not yet been captured in usable electronic form, and extensive outreach to the combustion-chemistry community will be required to make the data more accessible and useful and to ensure that the data are up to date. Fortunately, in this area there is significant prior work and a history of cooperative community efforts to build on.

For the reacting flow community, the CI must handle very large volumes of data, but the data are more homogeneous, and the computational and experimental data of greatest interest are generated by researchers at supercomputer centers, national laboratories, and universities. Although there are still significant community-outreach and data-documentation issues impacting the flame and reacting-flow research community, they are not as severe as for the fuels and chemistry research community. Many of the flame and reacting-flow community’s challenges here are technical: the mechanics of how to share and use extremely large data sets, how to ensure access to the validation data without compromising security, and so on. In this field, information is organized according to flame type and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology.

To be most valuable to industrial engineers developing new engines, combustors, and fuels, the combustion CI must allow efficient access



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