Appendix F
Biographies of the Committee Members

Mitchell D. Smooke is the Strathcona Professor of Engineering at Yale University and the chairman of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science. In addition, he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Applied Physics. Administratively, he has served as the dean of engineering, the chair and director of undergraduate studies of mechanical engineering, and the director of graduate studies for engineering. He received a B.S. in physics from Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1973, a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University in 1978, and an M.B.A. in management and finance from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983. Before joining the faculty at Yale, he was a staff scientist at the Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Since 1996, Dr. Smooke has served as an editor in chief of Combustion Theory and Modeling. He is currently on the board of directors of the Combustion Institute and was a program co-chair for the 32nd International Combustion Symposium in Montreal, Canada, in 2008. Dr. Smooke has been the recipient of the Combustion Institute’s Silver Medal and the Institute for the Dynamics of Explosions and Reacting Systems’ Oppenheim Award. More recently, he received the Yale University Graduate School Mentor Award, the Yale College Teaching Prize for Science and Engineering, the Yale Engineering Sheffield Teaching Prize, and the Yale Science and Engineering Association Award for the Advancement of Basic and Applied Science. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, of the Institute of Physics, and of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). Dr. Smooke has served on various technical



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Appendix F Biographies of the Committee Members Mitchell D. Smooke is the Strathcona Professor of Engineering at Yale University and the chairman of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science. In addition, he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Applied Physics. Administratively, he has served as the dean of engi - neering, the chair and director of undergraduate studies of mechanical engineering, and the director of graduate studies for engineering. He received a B.S. in physics from Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1973, a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University in 1978, and an M.B.A. in management and finance from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983. Before joining the faculty at Yale, he was a staff scien- tist at the Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Since 1996, Dr. Smooke has served as an editor in chief of Combustion Theory and Modeling. He is currently on the board of directors of the Combustion Institute and was a program co-chair for the 32nd International Combus - tion Symposium in Montreal, Canada, in 2008. Dr. Smooke has been the recipient of the Combustion Institute’s Silver Medal and the Institute for the Dynamics of Explosions and Reacting Systems’ Oppenheim Award. More recently, he received the Yale University Graduate School Mentor Award, the Yale College Teaching Prize for Science and Engineering, the Yale Engineering Sheffield Teaching Prize, and the Yale Science and Engi - neering Association Award for the Advancement of Basic and Applied Science. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astro- nautics, of the Institute of Physics, and of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). Dr. Smooke has served on various technical 95

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96 TRANSFORMING COMBUSTION RESEARCH THROUGH CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE boards and co-organized the U.S.-based SIAM meetings in computational combustion since 1991. His current primary research interests lie in the areas of computational combustion, energetic materials, chemical vapor deposition, and the numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. John B. Bell is senior staff mathematician and group leader for the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Prior to joining LBNL, he held positions at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Exxon Production Research, and the Naval Surface Weapons Center. Dr. Bell’s research focuses on the development and analysis of numerical methods for partial differential equations arising in science and engineering. He has made contribu- tions in the areas of finite difference methods, numerical methods for low-Mach-number flows, adaptive mesh refinement, interface tracking, and parallel computing. He has also worked on the application of these numerical methods to problems from a broad range of fields, including combustion, shock physics, seismology, flow in porous media, and astro- physics. He was the recipient of the SIAM/Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Prize in Computational Science and Engineering in 2003, and he received the Sidney Fernback Award in 2005. Jacqueline H. Chen is a distinguished member of the technical staff at the Combustion Research Facility at the Sandia National Laboratories. She has contributed broadly to research in petascale direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of turbulent combustion focusing on fundamental turbulence-chemistry interactions. These benchmark simulations pro- vide fundamental insight into combustion processes and are used by the combustion-modeling community to develop and validate turbu - lent combustion models for engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. In collaboration with computer scientists, Dr. Chen and her team have developed algorithms and software for automated combustion work flow, in situ data mining and visualization of petascale simulated combustion data, and reacting-flow DNS software for hybrid architectures. She received the Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) Award in 2005, 2007, and 2008-2010, and the Asian American Engineer of the Year Award in 2009. She is a member of the DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Research Advisory Committee and Subcommittee on Exascale Computing. She was the co-editor of the Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volumes 29 and 30, and a member of the executive committee of the board of directors of the Combustion Institute.

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97 APPENDIX F Meredith B. Colket III is a fellow in the Thermal and Fluid Sciences Department of United Technologies Research Center, where he has been employed for 31 years. He is an internationally known expert on the gas-phase kinetics of hydrocarbon fuels, on fuel preprocessing, probe phenomena, diagnostics for combustion-derived pollutants, and soot for- mation. Recently, he has led the development of new physics-based tools for the simulation of combustion phenomena, including emissions, in combustors and ignition of military augmentors. In addition, he has been helping develop technologies for the detection of toxic gases, fire suppres- sion, and burner control. Dr. Colket has about 40 peer-reviewed publica- tions, has been awarded 6 patents, and has been principal investigator/ program manager for a variety of government contracts, including four funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and two by the Air Force Research Laboratory. He also has been the recipient of two special awards and two outstanding achievement awards from the United Technologies Research Center; co-editor of the Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volumes 29 and 30; and has participated as member in a variety of panels for DOE, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Research Council (NRC), AIAA, and NASA. He was a col - loquium chair for the 32nd International Symposium on Combustion. Dr. Colket is currently a member of the executive board of the Combustion Institute, an associate editor for Combustion Science and Technology, the task leader for the Jet Fuels Surrogate Working Group sponsored by AFOSR, and a member of a review committee for the Implications of Natural Gas Interchangeability for the California Energy Commission. Thomas H. Dunning is the director of the National Center for Super- computing Applications and holds the Distinguished Chair for Research Excellence in Chemistry. He was at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1973, first in the Laser Theory Group and then in the Physical Chem - istry Group. Dr. Dunning was appointed group leader of the Theoretical and Computational Chemistry Group at the Argonne National Labora - tory in 1978. Beginning in 1989, Dr. Dunning held many positions at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, becoming director of the Envi- ronmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory in 1994 and the first Battelle Fellow in 1997. He spent 2 years (1999-2001) in the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy as assistant director for scientific simula - tion; there he was responsible for developing a new scientific computing program. He then went to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a professor of chemistry and was responsible for supercomputing and networking for the University of North Carolina System. In 2002, he was appointed director of the Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the

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98 TRANSFORMING COMBUSTION RESEARCH THROUGH CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE University of Tennessee, and Distinguished Scientist in Computing and Computational Sciences at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dr. Dun - ning joined the University of Illinois faculty in January 2005. Dennis Gannon is the director of engagements for the eXtreme Comput- ing Group in Microsoft Research. Prior to coming to Microsoft, he was a professor of computer science at Indiana University and the science director for the Indiana Pervasive Technology Labs. Dr. Gannon’s research interests include cloud computing, large-scale cyberinfrastructure, pro- gramming systems and tools, distributed computing, computer networks, parallel programming, computational science, problem-solving environ - ments, and performance analysis of supercomputing and distributed sys- tems. He led several software projects for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Department of Energy related to programming massively parallel systems. He has worked extensively with National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored interdisciplinary scientific teams on applications ranging from computational cosmology to predicting tornadoes and hurricanes. Dr. Gannon was on the executive steering com- mittee of the NSF TeraGrid, where he helped launch the Science Gateways project designed to enable access to supercomputing to a larger audience of researchers. He also managed the TeraGrid Science Advisory Board. Dr. Gannon was the program chair for the Institute of Electrical and Elec - tronics Engineers (IEEE) 2002 High Performance Distributed Computing Conference, the 1997 ACM International Conference on Supercomputing, the 1995 IEEE Frontiers of Massively Parallel Processing, and the Inter- national Grid Conference in Barcelona, 2006. He also served as general chair of the 1998 International Symposium on Scientific Object Oriented Programming Environments, the 2000 ACM Java Grande Conference, the ACM Principles and Practices of Parallel Programming Conference, and the ACM International Conference on Supercomputing. While he was chair of the Computer Science Department at Indiana University, he led the team that designed the university’s new School of Informatics. For that effort he was given the school’s Hermes Award in 2006. He has published more than 100 refereed articles, and he has co-edited 3 books. Dr. Gannon received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1980 after receiving a Ph.D. in mathemat- ics from the University of California, Davis. William H. Green is a professor of chemical engineering at the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology. His research group focuses on the central problem of reactive chemical engineering: quantitatively predicting the time evolution of chemical mixtures. Dr. Green has received the C.M. Mohr Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in 2006, American

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99 APPENDIX F Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Environmental Chemistry Certificate of Merit in 2005, the ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry Richard A. Glenn Award in 2004, the Thiele Lectureship Award (Notre Dame University) in 2004, and the NSF CAREER award for 1999-2003. He was an NSF postdoc- toral fellow in 1989-1990, a Darwin Research Fellow at Cambridge Uni - versity during 1989-1990, a NATO postdoctoral fellow in 1989, an Amoco Foundation Fellow in 1987, and an NSF graduate fellow during 1983-1985. Chung K. Law is the Robert H. Goddard Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. His research interests are in combustion, propulsion, heat and mass transfer, energy, alternative fuels, and the environment. His research accomplish- ments have included his receiving the Curtis W. McGraw Research Award of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) in 1984; a Silver Medal and the Egerton Gold Medal of the Combustion Institute in 1990 and 2006, respectively; the Propellants and Combustion Award, the Energy Systems Award, and the Pendray Aerospace Literature Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1994, 1999, and 2004, respectively; the Heat Transfer Memorial Award of the Ameri - can Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in 1997; and outstanding alumnus awards from the University of California at San Diego in 2000 and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in 2007. He is a fellow of the AIAA, ASME, and the American Physical Society (APS); a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE); a fellow of the Ameri - can Academy of Arts and Sciences; the director of the DOE Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center; the director of the Center for Combus- tion Energy at Tsinghua University, China; and a former president of the Combustion Institute. Miron Livny is a senior researcher and professor specializing in distrib- uted computing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been a professor of computer science at Wisconsin since 1983, where he leads the Condor high-throughput computing system project. He is also a principal investigator and currently the facility coordinator for the Open Science Grid project. In 2006, along with Raghu Ramakrishnan, Professor Livny won the ACM’s Special Interest Group on the Management of Data (SIG- MOD) Test of Time award for his seminal work on distributed databases. Mark Lundstrom is the Don and Carol Scifres Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University. His research and teaching focus on the theory, modeling, and simulation of nanoscale electronic devices. He co-founded the Purdue University Network Com-

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100 TRANSFORMING COMBUSTION RESEARCH THROUGH CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE puting Hub project, an early example of cyberinfrastructure that delivered electronic device simulation services through the World Wide Web. He was the founding director of the NSF-funded Network for Computational Nanotechnology, which has developed a second-generation cyberinfra - structure that supports the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative. He now directs the Network for Photovoltaic Technology, a Semiconductor Research Corporation consortium of companies in the United States, Asia, and Europe created to fund university research in photovoltaic technol - ogy. He is a fellow of the IEEE, the APS, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he is a member of the NAE. C. Bradley Moore is professor of chemistry emeritus in the Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley. His physical chemistry research includes molecular energy transfer, chemical reaction dynamics, photochemistry, and spectroscopy. Applications of his work are found in combustion and atmospheric chemistry, in chemical and molecular lasers, and in isotope separation. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as chair and dean at Berkeley and as vice president for research at the Ohio State University and at Northwestern University. Carole L. Palmer is a professor at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the director of the Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship. Her research investigates the changing nature of scientific and scholarly information work in the digital information environment, with a particular focus on barriers to interdisciplinary inquiry. She has written and presented widely on information support for research com - munities and how to align digital research collections with scientific and scholarly practices. She leads the nationally scoped Institute of Museum and Library Services Digital Collections and Content initiative, and is co- principal investigator on the Data Conservancy, an NSF DataNet award. Her other recent funded projects include investigations of data-curation needs across sciences, scholarly annotation, and institutional repository development, as well projects to develop educational programs in data curation and biological informatics. Arnaud Trouvé is an associate professor in the Department of Fire Pro- tection Engineering at the University of Maryland. His interests include fire modeling, including computational fluid dynamics and zone model - ing; direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flows; high-performance (parallel) scientific computing; physi - cal modeling of fire-related phenomena: buoyancy-generated turbulence,

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101 APPENDIX F turbulent combustion, combustion-generated soot, combustion-generated carbon monoxide, radiation heat transfer, wall surface heat transfer, water- based fire suppression systems, and flash fires, fireballs, and explosions. Charles Westbrook is a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). During his career at LLNL, he has been division leader of chemical biology and nuclear chemistry, chemistry and chemi - cal engineering, applied physics, and computational physics. He was awarded the Horning Memorial Award of the Society of Automotive Engineers in 1991, the Thomas Midgley Award of the American Chemi- cal Society in 1993, the Arch Colwell Award of Merit of the Society of Automotive Engineers in 2003, and the Bernard Lewis Gold Medal of the Combustion Institute in 2008. He has been a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers since 2008.

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