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FIGURE 7-4 Estimated vitamin D intakes in the United States from food sources only, by intake percentile groups, age, and gender.

FIGURE 7-4 Estimated vitamin D intakes in the United States from food sources only, by intake percentile groups, age, and gender.

NOTE: F = female; IU = International Units; M = male; y = years.

SOURCE: NHANES 2005–2006 as analyzed by Bailey et al. (2010). Data used to create figure can be found in Appendix H.

than those from the 2003 to 2006 data set because intake estimates for total vitamin D (i.e., the NCI method) are currently available only for the 2005 to 2006 data.

Assuming that a serum 25OHD level of 40 nmol/L is consistent with a desirable median intake,16 the comparison would suggest that, on average,

16

As discussed in Chapter 5, measures of 27.5 nmol/L in children, and 30 nmol/L in adults remain a level below which frank deficiency including rickets and osteomalacia may be expected to occur. The vitamin D-related bone health needs of approximately one-half of the population may be expected to be met at serum 25OHD concentrations between 30 and 40 nmol/L; most of the remaining members of the population are likely to have vitamin D needs met when serum concentrations between 40 and 50 nmol/L are achieved. Failure to achieve such serum concentrations place persons at greater risk for less than desirable bone



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