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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Paul D. Cleary, Ph.D. (Chair), is Dean of the Yale School of Public Health and Chair of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale School of Medicine. He is also Director of the Yale Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. Dr. Cleary’s research interests include developing better methods for using patient reports about their care and health status to evaluate the quality of medical care, as well as studying the relationships between clinician and organizational characteristics and the quality of medical care. He has published more than 200 research articles on these topics. Dr. Cleary’s recent research includes a study of how organizational characteristics affect the costs and quality of care for persons with AIDS and a national evaluation of a continuous quality-improvement initiative in clinics providing care to HIV-infected individuals. He also is Principal Investigator (PI) of one of the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Studies funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to develop survey protocols for collecting information from consumers regarding their health plans and services. Dr. Cleary is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and previously served as chair of the IOM Committee on the Ryan White Care Act: Data for Allocation, Planning, and Evaluation and as a member of the Committee on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Dr. Cleary received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin.

Ronald Bayer, Ph.D., M.A., is Professor at the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, where he has



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A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Paul D. Cleary, Ph.D. (Chair), is Dean of the Yale School of Public Health and Chair of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale School of Medi- cine. He is also Director of the Yale Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. Dr. Cleary’s research interests include developing better methods for using patient reports about their care and health status to evaluate the quality of medical care, as well as studying the relationships between clini- cian and organizational characteristics and the quality of medical care. He has published more than 200 research articles on these topics. Dr. Cleary’s recent research includes a study of how organizational characteristics affect the costs and quality of care for persons with AIDS and a national evalua- tion of a continuous quality-improvement initiative in clinics providing care to HIV-infected individuals. He also is Principal Investigator (PI) of one of the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Studies funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to develop survey protocols for collecting information from consumers regarding their health plans and services. Dr. Cleary is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and previously served as chair of the IOM Committee on the Ryan White Care Act: Data for Allocation, Planning, and Evaluation and as a member of the Committee on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Dr. Cleary received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the Uni- versity of Wisconsin. Ronald Bayer, Ph.D., M.A., is Professor at the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, where he has 75

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76 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE taught for 20 years. He has taken a leadership role in the HIV Center’s work on ethics since the center’s beginnings and is now Co-Director of the Ethics, Policy, and Human Rights Core. Prior to coming to Columbia, he was at the Hastings Center, a research institute devoted to the study of ethi- cal issues in medicine and the life sciences. Dr. Bayer’s research has exam- ined ethical and policy issues in public health, with a special focus on AIDS, tuberculosis, illicit drugs, and tobacco. His broader goal is to develop an ethics of public health. He is an elected member of the IOM, and has served on IOM committees addressing the social impact of AIDS, tuberculosis elimination, vaccine safety, smallpox vaccination, and the Ryan White Care Act. His articles on AIDS have appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Lancet, the American Journal of Public Health, and the Milbank Quarterly. Dr. Bayer is coauthor and editor of several books including Private Acts, Social Con- sequences: AIDS and the Politics of Public Health (1989); AIDS Doctors: Voices from the Epidemic (2000, written with Gerald Oppenheimer); Mor- tal Secrets: Truth and Lies in the Age of AIDS (2003, written with Robert Klitzman); Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in America (2007, written with Amy Fairchild and James Colgrave); and Shattered Dreams: An Oral History of the South African AIDS Epidemic (2007, written with Gerald Oppenheimer). Dr. Bayer holds Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in political science from the University of Chicago. Eric G. Bing, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is the Endowed Professor of Global Health and HIV in the Department of Psychiatry at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. A psychiatrist and epidemiologist, Dr. Bing is the founder and Director of SPECTRUM Community Services and Research, a community-based clinical and research center that pro- vides HIV care to more than 500 people (primarily African-American and Latinos) each year and develops and evaluates innovative health services for underserved communities. He is also the founder and Director of the Drew Center for AIDS Research, Education and Services (Drew CARES), a research center focusing on HIV among disadvantaged populations, both locally and internationally. Dr. Bing is currently the PI on projects funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), U.S. Department of Defense, the California HIV Research Program, and others. His research primarily focuses on developing and evaluating interventions to improve health care and health outcomes for disadvantaged populations, particularly those affected by HIV, mental illness, and/or alcohol and drug problems in civilian and military populations. Dr. Bing is a Co-PI of the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services and the PI of the Institute of Community Health Research, based in Los Angeles, California.

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77 APPENDIX A Dr. Bing has projects focusing on HIV domestically and in Africa and the Carribbean. Dr. Bing received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and trained as a psychiatrist at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. He received his M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health. Scott Burris, J.D., is Professor of Law at Temple Law School and Director of the National Program Office for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Public Health Law Research Program. He began his career in public health law during the early days of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. He was the editor of the first systematic legal analysis of HIV in the United States, AIDS and the Law: A Guide for the Public (Yale University Press, 1987; New Guide for the Public published 1993), and spent several years lobbying and litigating on behalf of people with HIV as an attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union. Since joining the Temple faculty in 1991, his research has focused on how law influences public health and health behavior. He is the author of more than 100 books, book chapters, articles, and reports on issues including discrimination against people with HIV and other disabilities; HIV policy; research ethics; and the health effects of criminal law and drug policy. His current research topics include health governance, the regulation of sexual behavior, harm reduction, and human research subject protec- tion. He is a member of the Law, Policy, and Ethics Core of the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS at Yale, and he serves as an advisor to the Tsinghua University AIDS Institute, the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences Research Center for HIV/AIDS Public Policy, and the Health and Human Rights Program at Human Rights Watch. Mr. Burris served on the IOM Committee on Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century, as well as the Committee on Regulating Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis. He received his law degree from Yale Law School. J. Kevin Carmichael, M.D., is Chief of Service of the Special Immunology Associates Clinic at the El Rio Community Health Center in Tucson, Ari- zona. Dr. Carmichael’s work of providing care to people with HIV began in 1985 while he was in medical school. In his current role as Chief of Service at the El-Rio Community Health Center, Dr. Carmichael oversees the care of nearly 1,500 persons living with HIV throughout southern Arizona. He also travels the state to provide care for patients and give clinical support for physicians dealing with HIV in rural areas. He has been an author and reviewer of articles and books on HIV/AIDS care and is currently Co-Chair of the Steering Committee of the Ryan White Medical Providers Coalition, which supports providers in delivering qual- ity HIV care to their patients. Dr. Carmichael received his M.D. from the University of Miami.

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78 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE Susan Cu-Uvin, M.D., is Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Medicine at Brown University, where she is also Director of the Brown Global Health Initiative. Before that, she was Director of the Immunol- ogy Center at the Miriam Hospital for 10 years. She is the Director of the Women and AIDS Core for the Center for AIDS Research and Director of the Research Program of the Women and Infants Hospital Center of Excel- lence in Women’s Health. Dr. Cu-Uvin’s research focuses on HIV in women, primarily in understanding the effect of antiretroviral therapy on HIV shed- ding in the female genital tract. She is also involved in research on sexually transmitted diseases including human papilloma virus (HPV, genital warts) in the cervix and anal canal of HIV infected women, cervical/anal dysplasia or cancer, HPV vaccines, herpes, and bacterial vaginosis. She was the Chair of the Women’s Health Committee of the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group from 2004 to 2006, and Chair of the 2008 NIH Advisory Committee on HIV-Related Research in Women and Girls in 2008, and is a member of the NIH Advisory Committee on HIV-Related Research in Microbicides. She served on the IOM Committee on Perinatal Transmission of HIV to investigate interventions to decrease vertical transmission of HIV within the United States, and she is currently a member of the IOM Committee on Women’s Health Research. Dr. Cu-Uvin received her M.D. from the University of the Philippines, Philippine General Hospital. Jennifer Kates, M.A., M.P.A., is the Director of Global Health Policy and HIV Policy and Vice President at the Kaiser Family Foundation, where she oversees policy analysis and research focused on the domestic and global HIV epidemics. She has been working on HIV policy issues for 20 years and is a recognized expert in the field. In addition, Ms. Kates works on the foundation’s broader global health policy projects, which are designed to provide timely policy analysis and data on the U.S. government’s role in global health. Prior to joining the Foundation in 1998, Ms. Kates was a senior associate with the Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm, where she focused on HIV policy, strategic planning/health systems analysis, and health care for vulnerable populations. She previously worked at Prince- ton University, where she served as the director of the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns Office, and was also the coordinator of the University’s Alcohol and Other Drugs Peer Education Program. In addition to this com- mittee, Ms. Kates is currently serving as a member of an IOM committee tasked with developing a plan for the assessment and evaluation of HIV/ AIDS programs implemented under the U.S. Global Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008. Ms. Kates received her master’s degree in public affairs from Princeton Univer- sity’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and her

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79 APPENDIX A bachelor’s in political science from Dartmouth College. She also holds a master’s degree in political science from the University of Massachusetts. Currently, she is pursuing a doctorate in public policy at George Washing- ton University, where she is also a lecturer. Arleen A. Leibowitz, Ph.D., M.A., is a Professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She was Chair of the UCLA Department of Public Policy from 1997 to 2002 and from 2005 to 2007. Dr. Leibowitz’s work in health policy has examined how economic incentives affect the demand for health care by patients and how changing the incentives alters the costs of public programs that pay for health care. She designed and led a study of the use of health care by Medicaid recipients in prepaid plans and in the fee-for-service sector and headed the Economics Core of the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study. Dr. Leibowitz’s current research includes the cost of treating HIV infection in the United States and health reform. She heads the California Center for HIV/AIDS Policy Research at UCLA, where she is examining the geo- graphic distribution of public funding of HIV treatment, prevention, and support services in California. She also heads the Policy Core of the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services, where her work focuses on HIV prevention and testing. Dr. Leibowitz received her Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in economics from Columbia University. Alvaro Muñoz, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Epidemiology with joint appointments in the Departments of Biostatistics and Environ- mental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. A statistician by training, Dr. Muñoz has been conducting research on HIV and AIDS since the late 1980s when his work contributed methods to combine seroprevalent and incident cohorts for the characterization of the incubation period of AIDS. During the 1990s, Dr. Muñoz and col- laborators documented the prognostic information of CD4 cell count on the development of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) which was instrumental in the issuing of Public Health Services guidelines regarding individuals who should receive prophylaxis for PCP. He and collaborators also conducted work to help characterize the frequency of antiretroviral therapy usage, populations more likely to receive therapy, and the impact of therapy on the incidence of clinical outcomes and in the trajectories of markers of disease progression. His more recent contributions include pro- viding methods for cohort studies to assess treatment effectiveness at the individual and population levels and in doing so linking epidemiological studies and public health. Dr. Muñoz received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University.

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80 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE Liisa M. Randall, Ph.D., is Director of the HIV/AIDS Prevention and Inter- vention Section in the Division of Health, Wellness, and Disease Control at the Michigan Department of Community Health. In this role she oversees state HIV counseling, testing, and referral services, as well as behavioral interventions for populations in Michigan that are at increased risk for transmitting and acquiring HIV. Dr. Randall’s expertise in health promo- tion and disease prevention, social and behavioral science, and community- based health planning have helped guide Michigan’s nationally recognized HIV prevention work. In 2006, Dr. Randall was one of three state health department HIV/AIDS program staff to receive the National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors’ Nicholas A. Rango Leadership Award. In addition to her work on HIV prevention in Michigan, Ms. Randall has served nationally as a resource on HIV testing. She has published several articles and reports on HIV counseling and testing, program management, community planning, and capacity building. Dr. Randall received her Ph.D. in medical anthropology from Michigan State University. Beth Scalco, M.P.A., M.S.W., is Director of the HIV/AIDS Program of the Louisiana Office of Public Health, the state office responsible for oversee- ing Louisiana’s response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. As Director of the HIV/AIDS Program, Ms. Scalco negotiates and monitors contracts with community-based organizations, medical facilities, and home health agen- cies throughout the state, and develops monitoring and evaluation tools and guidelines to assure the delivery of effective services by contracted entities. Previously, Ms. Scalco was a coordinator of Louisiana HIV/AIDS programs and resources for children and adolescents, and Director of Project Lagniappe, a program that provided case management and ancil- lary services to families of children who are at risk of abandonment due to parental substance use or progression of HIV disease. Ms. Scalco served as Chair of the National Association of State and Territorial AIDS Directors from 2004 to 2005, and is a current member of the Louisiana Commission on HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C. A licensed clinical social worker, Ms. Scalco received her M.S.W. from the Louisiana State University School of Social Work. She also holds an M.P.A. from the University of New Orleans Col- lege of Urban Planning and Public Administration. Victor J. Schoenbach, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., M.Sc., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). He is also Director of the Minority Health Project at UNC. Dr. Schoenbach’s research interests include minority health, prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, and the epidemiology of social behavior. Topics of his more recent publications include the roles of social networks and social

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81 APPENDIX A context in HIV transmission among African Americans, and HIV testing, seropositivity, and access to medical services among North Carolina pris- oners. Recently, Dr. Schoenbach was Co-PI of an NIH-funded multilevel analysis of concurrent sexual partnering (PI: Dr. Adaora Adimora). In addition to research, Dr. Schoenbach has had a long-standing commitment to increasing diversity among public health researchers and practitioners. Dr. Schoenbach received his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the UNC Gill- ings School of Global Public Health. He also holds an M.S.P.H. in health education from UNC and an M.Sc. in economics from the London School of Economics. Martin F. Shapiro, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is a Professor in the Departments of Medicine and Health Services and Chief of the Division of General Inter- nal Medicine and Health Services Research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Shapiro’s scholarship has focused on the general theme of assuring that medical care is applied equitably and appropriately to the population and on health services research in the area of HIV dis- ease. He was the PI on the HIV Costs and Services Utilization Study, a national study of AIDS costs and AIDS patients’ access to and quality of care. He was President of the Society of General Internal Medicine from 2002 to 2003 and is an elected member of the American Society of Clini- cal Investigation and of the Association of American Physicians. In 1988, Dr. Shapiro established the Primary Care Research Fellowship Program at UCLA, which he directed until 2003. Dr. Shapiro served on the IOM Committee on Public Financing and Delivery of HIV Care, as well as the Committee on the Responsible Conduct of Research. Dr. Shapiro earned his M.D. at McGill University in Montreal. He completed his residency at Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal and at UCLA, where he also earned a master of public health degree and a Ph.D. in history, the latter focusing on health care services in Portuguese Africa. Liza Solomon, Dr.P.H., M.H.S., is a noted HIV/AIDS public policy leader and the former Director of the Maryland State AIDS Administration. Dr. Solomon is currently a principal associate in the Domestic Health Division at Abt Associates. Dr. Solomon has over three decades of public health experience in areas such as epidemiology, women’s health, and head and extremity injury and trauma. At Abt Associates, Dr. Solomon plays a senior role in developing, managing, and evaluating HIV/AIDS programs on behalf of clients such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Pre- vention (CDC) and the U.S. Health Resources and Service Administration. Dr. Solomon served for nine years as director of the AIDS Administration at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where she had responsibility for managing statewide HIV activities including over-

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82 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE sight of Maryland’s HIV care and treatment programs, HIV surveillance initiatives, and responsibility for all CDC-funded prevention activities in the state. Immediately prior to joining Abt Associates, Dr. Solomon was deputy director of the Alliance for Microbicide Development, an interna- tional nonprofit organization dedicated to encouraging the development of female-controlled HIV and STI preventive agents. Previously, she was a member of the faculty at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health where she managed large multisite epidemiologic studies of HIV infection in drug users and women. Dr. Solomon earned her Dr.P.H. and M.H.S. degrees from Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Antonia M. Villarruel, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is Associate Dean of Research, Professor and the Nola J. Pender Collegiate Chair in Health Promotion, and Director of the Center for Health Promotion at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. Dr. Villarruel has an extensive background in health promotion and health disparities research and practice. Specifically, her research focuses on the development and testing of interventions to reduce HIV sexual risk among Mexican and Latino youth. Dr. Villarruel has been the PI and Co-PI of several NIH and CDC-funded studies. She developed an effective program to reduce sexual risk behavior among Latino youth entitled ¡Cuídate! (Take Care of Yourself). This program will be dissemi- nated nationally by the CDC as part of their Diffusion of Evidence-Based Interventions project. Dr. Villarruel has assumed leadership roles in many national and local organizations. She is President and founding member of the National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nursing Associations and past president of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses. She was appointed by Secretary Thompson to the HRSA/CDC HIV/STD Advi- sory Council, and also served as a charter member of the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities. Dr. Villarruel has been recognized by numer- ous local and national agencies for her service and scholarship. She was inducted as a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and was elected to the IOM in 2007. She received her Ph.D. from Wayne State University and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan.