I
Committee Biographies

Alfred O. Berg, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is a professor of family medicine at the University of Washington Department of Family Medicine in Seattle. Dr. Berg was elected to be an Institute of Medicine (IOM) member in 1996. He was a member of the IOM Immunization Safety Review Committee and chair of the Committee on the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. In 2004 he received the Thomas W. Johnson Award for career contributions to family medicine education from the American Academy of Family Physicians; in 2008 he received the F. Marian Bishop Leadership Award from the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Foundation; and in 2010 he received the Curtis Hames Research Award, family medicine’s highest research honor. He has served on many national expert panels to assess evidence and provide clinical guidance, including serving as chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF); cochair of the otitis media panel convened by the former Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Sexually Transmitted Disease Treatment Guidelines panel; member of the American Medical Association/CDC panel that produced Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services; and chair of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) State-of-the-Science Conference on Family History and Improving Health. He currently chairs the CDC panel on Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention. Dr. Berg earned his M.D. at Washington University in St. Louis and his M.P.H. at the University of



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I Committee Biographies Alfred O. Berg, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is a professor of family medi- cine at the University of Washington Department of Family Medi- cine in Seattle. Dr. Berg was elected to be an Institute of Medicine (IOM) member in 1996. He was a member of the IOM Immuniza- tion Safety Review Committee and chair of the Committee on the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. In 2004 he received the Thomas W. Johnson Award for career contributions to family medi- cine education from the American Academy of Family Physicians; in 2008 he received the F. Marian Bishop Leadership Award from the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Foundation; and in 2010 he received the Curtis Hames Research Award, family medicine’s high- est research honor. He has served on many national expert panels to assess evidence and provide clinical guidance, including serving as chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF); cochair of the otitis media panel convened by the former Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Sexually Transmitted Disease Treatment Guidelines panel; member of the American Medical Association/ CDC panel that produced Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services; and chair of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) State-of-the- Science Conference on Family History and Improving Health. He currently chairs the CDC panel on Evaluation of Genomic Applica - tions in Practice and Prevention. Dr. Berg earned his M.D. at Wash- ington University in St. Louis and his M.P.H. at the University of 307

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308 FINDING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE Washington. He completed residencies in Family Medicine at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and in General Preventive Medi- cine and Public Health at the University of Washington. Sally C. Morton, Ph.D. (Vice Chair), is professor and chair of biosta- tistics in the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh. She holds secondary appointments in the Department of Statistics and Department of Clinical and Translational Science. Pre- viously, she was vice president for statistics and epidemiology at RTI International in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Prior to that position, she was head of RAND Corporation’s statistics group, held the RAND-endowed chair in statistics, and was codirector of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Southern Cali- fornia Evidence-based Practice Center. She was the 2009 president of the American Statistical Association (ASA). Dr. Morton is a Fellow of the ASA and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the Society for Research Syn- thesis Methodology. Her interests include comparative effectiveness research, the use of meta-analysis in evidence-based medicine, and the sampling of vulnerable populations. She is a founding editor of Statistics, Politics, and Policy, and served on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, and Statistical Science. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on National Statistics, and has served as a member of several IOM committees concerning comparative effectiveness and systematic reviews. She has a Ph.D. in Statistics from Stanford University. Jesse A. Berlin, Sc.D., is the vice president of epidemiology at John- son & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development. His group is involved throughout the drug development process and in the design, analysis, and interpretation of postapproval studies. At the IOM, he served on the Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides and, subsequently, on the committee’s First Biennial Update. In 1989 he joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania in a unit that became the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, under the direc- tion of Dr. Brian Strom. Dr. Berlin spent several years as director of biostatistics for the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center. He has authored or coauthored more than 220 publications in a wide variety of clinical and methodological areas. Dr. Berlin has a great deal of experience in both the application of meta-analysis and the study of meta-analytic methods as applied to both randomized tri-

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309 APPENDIX I als and epidemiology. He has also served as a consultant on meta- analysis for the Australian government. Dr. Berlin received his Sc.D. in Biostatistics from the Harvard School of Public Health. Mohit Bhandari, M.D., Ph.D., is the Canada research chair in mus- culoskeletal trauma at McMaster University Orthopaedic Research Unity, Clarity Research Group, at the Hamilton Health Sciences- General Site in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. He also serves as assistant professor, Department of Surgery, and associate member, Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, at McMaster. Dr. Bhandari’s clinical interests include the care of patients with musculoskeletal injuries. His research broadly focuses on clinical tri- als, meta-analyses, methodological aspects of surgery trials, and the translation of evidence into surgical practice. Specific areas of inter- est include identifying optimal management strategies to improve patient-important outcomes in patients with multiple injuries, lower extremity fractures, and severe soft-tissue injuries. Dr. Bhandari is currently coordinating trials of tibial fracture management and vari- ous wound irrigation techniques in open fractures. He also leads the international hip fracture research collaborative, a global consortium of surgeons focusing on the design and development of large, defini- tive surgical randomized trials in patients with hip fractures. In rec- ognition of his research contributions, he has received the Edouard J. Samson Award for a Canadian orthopedic surgeon with the great - est impact on research in the past 5 years, the Founder’s Medal for research, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Medal in Surgical Research. Dr. Bhandari is a graduate of the University of Toronto. He completed both his orthopedic surgery and Master’s of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics training at McMaster University. Giselle Corbie-Smith, M.D., M.Sc., is a professor of social medicine and medicine at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Dr. Corbie-Smith is the director of the Program on Health Disparities at the UNC Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research. The purpose of this program is to coordinate and enhance disparity research within the Sheps Center and throughout UNC, to build expertise in working with minority communities, and to improve collaboration and communication with minority-serving institutions in North Carolina and the nation. She served on the IOM Committee on Ethical Issues in Housing-Related Health Haz - ard Research Involving Children, Youth and Families. Dr. Corbie- Smith has been the Principal Investigator on grants from the NIH

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310 FINDING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to examine the patient- specific and investigator-specific factors that influence participation in research. She is also director of the Community Engagement Research Core of the Carolina–Shaw Partnership for the Elimina- tion of Health Disparities. The core’s main goal is to build commu - nity–academic relationships to increase minority participation in research. Her other studies include defining the barriers and facilita- tors to African American elders’ use of influenza vaccines; research on HIV risk among older African American women; and the impact of training in cultural competency on knowledge and skills among medical students and residents. Dr. Corbie-Smith was awarded the Jefferson-Pilot Fellowship in Academic Medicine, the highest award for assistant professors in the School of Medicine, and the National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities Award for Lead - ership in Health Disparities Research. She is the deputy director of the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute. Her clinical work focuses on serving underserved populations in public hospitals and clinics. She earned her M.D. at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and trained as an Internal Medicine intern, resident, and chief resident at Yale University School of Medicine. She received an M.Sc. in Clinical Research from the Epidemiology Department at Emory University. Kay Dickersin, M.A., Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and director of the Center for Clinical Trials. She has served as director of the U.S. Cochrane Center (originally Baltimore Cochrane Center) since 1994 and is director of the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group U.S. Satel - lite. At the IOM, she has served on numerous committees, including the Committee on Comparative Effectiveness Research Prioritiza - tion, Committee on Reviewing Evidence to Identify Highly Effec- tive Clinical Services, and Committee on Reimbursement of Routine Patient Care Costs for Medicare Patients Enrolled in Clinical Trials. Dr. Dickersin’s main research contributions have been in clinical trials, systematic reviews, publication bias, trials registers, and the development and use of methods for the evaluation of medical care and its effectiveness. Her current research is funded by the NIH, AHRQ, and Blue Shield California. Among her many honors are election as president of the Society for Clinical Trials (2008–2009) and election as a member in the American Epidemiological Soci - ety, the Society for Research Synthesis, and the IOM. Dr. Dickersin received an M.A. in Zoology, specializing in Cell Biology, from the University of California–Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in Epidemiol -

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311 APPENDIX I ogy from Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Jeremy M. Grimshaw, M.B.Ch.B., Ph.D., is a senior scientist in the Clinical Epidemiology Program of the Ottawa Health Research Institute and director of the Centre for Best Practice, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa. He holds a Tier 1 Cana- dian Research Chair in Health Knowledge Transfer and Uptake and is a full professor in the Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa. He served as a member of the IOM Forum on the Sci- ence of Health Care Quality Improvement and Implementation. His research focuses on the evaluation of interventions to dissemi- nate and implement evidence-based practice. He is director of the Canadian Cochrane Network and Centre. He is coordinating editor of the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care group and he has been involved in a series of systematic reviews of guide - line dissemination and implementation strategies. Dr. Grimshaw has been involved in more than 30 cluster randomized trials of different dissemination and implementation strategies conducted in a wide range of settings (including community pharmacy set- tings, family medicine settings, and secondary- and tertiary-care set- tings). Furthermore, he has evaluated a wide range of interventions (e.g., educational meetings, educational outreach, organizational interventions, computerized guidelines) relating to a wide range of behaviors. He has also undertaken research into statistical issues in the design, conduct, and analysis of cluster randomized trials. Recently his research has focused on assessing the applicability of behavioral theories to healthcare professional and organizational behaviors. He has authored more than 300 peer-reviewed publica- tions and 60 monographs and book chapters. Dr. Grimshaw received an M.B.Ch.B. (M.D. equivalent) from the University of Edinburgh, UK. He trained as a family physician prior to undertaking a Ph.D. in Health Services Research at the University of Aberdeen. Mark Helfand, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., is a staff physician at the Port- land Veterans Affairs Medical Center and professor of medicine and medical informatics & clinical epidemiology at Oregon Health & Science University. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholar from 1993 to 1997 and has been director of the Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center since 1997. Dr. Helfand has been a leader in methods for comparative effectiveness research. He led a team that helped the USPSTF prioritize topics and develop evidence-based guidelines. In the area of comparative effectiveness,

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312 FINDING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE he was a founder of the Drug Effectiveness Review Project. His research focuses on the use of systematic reviews to inform clinical and public policy. His current projects include the Coordinating Center for the VA’s Evidence-based Synthesis Program. In addition, Dr. Helfand has been editor in chief of the journal Medical Decision Making since 2005. He earned Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of English Literature degrees from Stanford University. He received his M.D. from the University of Illinois and completed postgraduate training in Internal Medicine at Stanford Medical School. Vincent E. Kerr, M.D., is president of Care Solutions, UnitedHealth- care. He provides strategic leadership and a focus on customer needs in the key areas of care management, clinical operations, con- sumer health, and medical care advancement. He works closely with UnitedHealth Networks, United Pharmacy Management, and United Resource Networks. From this leadership position, he also represents UnitedHealthcare with a number of employer-based organizations, including the American Benefits Council, the National Business Group on Health, Bridges to Excellence, and others. The former director of healthcare management and chief medical officer for Ford Motor Co., in Dearborn, Michigan, Dr. Kerr was responsible for managing one of the largest private employer healthcare plans in the nation. During his tenure at Ford, he was responsible for managing health benefits for all Ford employees globally, for worksite health and safety, and for providing leadership to the staff at more than 100 medical centers at Ford’s major manufacturing facilities around the world. Dr. Kerr also served as a lead negotiator for Ford with the United Auto Workers. Prior to joining Ford, he was the company medical director at General Electric (GE) in Fairfield, Connecticut, and focused on improving care processes using Six Sigma in GE’s many medical facilities. Previously, Dr. Kerr practiced medicine as an attending physician, cofounding a multisite group practice and urgent care facility and serving as a member of the clinical teaching faculty of Yale Medical School. He has served on the boards of a number of prestigious industry groups focused on quality in health care, including the National Business Group on Health, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), and the Voluntary Hospital Association. He also chaired the Leapfrog Group. Dr. Kerr attended Harvard University and received his M.D. from the Yale University School of Medicine. He is trained in Internal Medicine and Occupational Medicine. Marguerite A. Koster, M.A., M.F.T., is the practice leader of the Technology Assessment & Guidelines Unit within the Southern Cali-

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313 APPENDIX I fornia Permanente Medical Group, a partnership of physicians that contracts exclusively with the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan to provide medical services for more than 3 million members in Kaiser Permanente’s (KP’s) Southern California Region. In this position, she manages a staff of 10 evidence specialists who systematically review and critically appraise scientific evidence in support of Kaiser Permanente’s clinical practice guideline, medical technology assess - ment, and health system implementation programs. For the past 20 years, Ms. Koster has been actively involved in the advancement of evidence-based medicine and methodology standards for guideline development and technology assessment at Kaiser Permanente’s national and regional levels. She is a member of the KP Southern California Medical Technology Assessment Team, the KP Interre- gional New Technologies Committee, the KP National Guideline Directors, and the KP Guideline Quality Committee. Ms. Koster also has a long history of collaboration with other healthcare organiza- tions, medical and professional societies, and accreditation groups, in the areas of evidence-based clinical guideline development, tech- nology assessment, and performance measurement. Major interest areas include systematic review methodology, methods for synthe- sizing evidence, evidence grading systems, collaborative guideline development, and integration of evidence-based clinical content into electronic health systems. Prior to joining Kaiser Permanente, Ms. Koster was a research analyst at the University of Southern Califor- nia’s Social Science Research Institute, where she conducted survey research for grants funded by the U.S. National Institute of Justice and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. In addition, she worked for several years as a psychotherapist special - izing in long-term, residential addiction treatment and recovery pro- grams for court-referred and homeless drug users, and is currently a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in the State of California. Katie Maslow, M.S.W., is a consultant on aging, dementia, and Alzheimer’s care issues. She served as a member of the recent IOM Committee on Comparative Effectiveness Research Prioritization and an earlier IOM Committee to Review the Social Security Admin- istration’s Disability Decision Process Research. From 1995 to 2010, she worked for the Alzheimer’s Association, focusing on practice and policy initiatives to improve the quality, coordination, and out - comes of healthcare and long-term services and support for persons with Alzheimer’s and other dementias and to support their fam- ily caregivers. She directed the association’s initiative on managed care, and codirected its multisite demonstration project, Chronic

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314 FINDING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE Care Networks for Alzheimer’s Disease. She also directed the associ- ation’s demonstration project on improving hospital care for people with dementia, which included the development of training materi- als for hospital nurses caring for this population in partnership with the John A. Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. She represented the association on the National Assisted Living Workgroup and was a primary author of the association’s annual report, Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures. Before joining the Alzheimer’s Associa- tion, Ms. Maslow worked for 12 years at the U.S. Office of Technol- ogy Assessment, studying policy issues in aging, Alzheimer’s dis- ease, long-term care, end-of-life issues, and case management. Ms. Maslow has served on numerous government and nongovernment advisory panels on aging, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, family caregiving, home care, assisted living, nursing home care, and care coordination. She has served on the national board of the American Society of Aging and won the Society award in 2003. She is a mem - ber of the American Geriatrics Society, Gerontological Society of America, and National Association of Social Workers. She graduated from Stanford University and received her M.S.W. from Howard University. David A. Mrazek, M.D., F.R.C. Psych., is chair of the department of psychiatry and psychology at the Mayo Clinic. He is a child and adolescent psychiatrist with a longstanding interest in devel - opmental psychopathology and the interaction of biological and environmental risk factors. He is currently the Principal Investigator of a large federally funded project studying the pharmacogenom - ics of antidepressant response. He is also director of the Samuel C. Johnson Program for the Genomics of Addiction. Before joining the Mayo Clinic, he was the Leon Yochelson Professor of Psychiatry at the George Washington University School of Medicine. Christopher H. Schmid, Ph.D., is director of the Biostatistics Research Center in the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center. He is also professor of medi- cine and associate director of the program in clinical and transla - tional science at Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is also adjunct professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts. He is a coeditor of the Journal of Research Synthesis Methods; statistical editor of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases; a member of the editorial board for BMC Medicine; and a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, where he is past chair of the International Conference

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315 APPENDIX I on Health Policy Statistics. In addition, Dr. Schmid is an elected member of the Society for Research Synthesis Methodology. He has served on study sections with several federal agencies; is a member of the Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilita- tion Devices Panels; consults with the European Medicines Agency; and serves on the External Advisory Committee for ECRI. His major research interests include development and application of Bayesian models to clinical research, statistical methods and computational tools for meta-analysis, methods for combining and analyzing data from multiple clinical trials and clinical studies; and methods for handling missing time-dependent data in longitudinal studies. Dr. Schmid received his Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University. Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and joint appointed in the Department of Nutrition in the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. Dr. Siega-Riz is a Fellow at the Caro- lina Population Center and serves as associate chair of the Depart - ment of Epidemiology and director of the Nutrition Epidemiology Core for the Clinical Nutrition Research Center in the Department of Nutrition. She is also the program leader for the Reproductive, Perinatal, and Pediatric Program in the Department of Epidemiol- ogy. Dr. Siega-Riz served on the IOM Committee to Reexamine IOM Pregnancy Weight Guidelines and the IOM Committee to Review the WIC Food Packages. She has expertise in diet methodology, gestational weight gain, maternal nutritional status and its effects on birth outcomes, obesity development, and dietary trends and intakes among children and Hispanic populations. She was the lead investigator of the evidence-based review on outcomes of maternal weight gain sponsored by AHRQ. Dr. Siega-Riz uses a multidisci- plinary team perspective as a way to address complex problems such as prematurity, fetal programming, and racial disparities and obesity. She received the March of Dimes Agnes Higgins Award for Maternal and Fetal Nutrition in 2007. Dr. Siega-Riz earned a B.S.P.H. in Nutrition from the School of Public Health at UNC–Chapel Hill; an M.S. in Food, Nutrition, and Food Service Management from UNC–Greensboro; and a Ph.D. in Nutrition and Epidemiology from the School of Public Health at UNC–Chapel Hill. Harold C. Sox, M.D., recently retired after 8 years as editor of Annals of Internal Medicine. After serving as a medical intern and resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, he spent 2 years doing research in immunology at the NIH and 3 years at Dartmouth Medical School,

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316 FINDING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE where he served as chief medical resident and began his studies of medical decision making. He then spent 15 years on the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine, where he was the chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and director of ambula- tory care at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center. In 1988 he returned to Dartmouth, where he served for 13 years as the Joseph M. Huber Professor of Medicine and chair of the Department of Medicine. He was elected to the IOM in 1993 and to a Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2002. Dr. Sox has served on numerous IOM committees, including the Committee on an Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision-Making, Committee on Comparative Effectiveness Research Prioritization, Committee on Reviewing Evidence to Identify Highly Effective Clinical Services, Committee to Study HIV Transmission through Blood Products, and Committee on Health Effects Associated with Exposures Experienced in the Gulf War. Dr. Sox was president of the American College of Physicians during 1998–1999. He chaired the USPSTF from 1990 to 1995, chaired the Medicare Coverage Advi- sory Committee of the Center for Medicare Services from 1999 to 2003, and served on the Report Review Committee of the National Research Council from 2000 to 2005. He currently chairs the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Phy- sician Faculty Scholars Program and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making. He is also a member of the Stakeholders Group for the Effective Health Care Program of the Agency for Health Research and Policy. His books include Medical Decision Making, Common Diagnostic Tests: Selection and Interpretation, and HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Dr. Sox earned a B.S. in Physics from Stan- ford University and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Paul Wallace, M.D., is medical director of Health and Productiv- ity Management Programs at the Permanente Federation. He is a member of the IOM Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice and served on the IOM Planning Committee for a Workshop on a Foundation for Evidence-Driven Practice: A Rapid-Learning System for Cancer Care, the IOM Planning Committee for a Work- shop on Applying What We Know: Best Practices in Evidence-Based Medicine, and the IOM Subcommittee on Performance Measures. Dr. Wallace is an active participant, program leader, and perpet- ual student in clinical quality improvement, especially in the area of translation of evidence into care delivery using people- and technology-based innovation supported by performance measure-

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317 APPENDIX I ment. At Kaiser Permanente, he leads work to extend KP’s experi- ence with population-based care to further develop and integrate wellness, health maintenance, and productivity enhancement inter- ventions. He is also active in the design and promotion of systematic approaches to comparative effectiveness assessment and accelerated organizational learning. He was executive director of KP’s Care Management Institute (CMI) from 2000 to 2005 and continues as a senior advisor to CMI and to Avivia Health, the KP disease manage- ment company established in 2005. Board certified in Internal Medi- cine and Hematology, he previously taught clinical and basic sci- ences and investigated bone marrow function as a faculty member at Oregon Health & Science University. Dr. Wallace is a Board member for AcademyHealth and for the Society of Participatory Medicine. He recently concluded terms as the Board Chair for the Center for Information Therapy, and as a Board member and Secretary for DMAA: The Care Continuum Alliance. He previously served on the National Advisory Council for AHRQ, the Medical Cover- age Advisory Committee for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Medical Advisory Panel for the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Technology Evaluation Center, and the NCQA Committee on Performance Measurement and Standards. He received his M.D. at the University of Iowa School of Medicine and completed further training in Internal Medicine and Hematology at Strong Memorial Hospital and the University of Rochester.

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