TABLE 7.2 Illustrative Funding Scenario for a NASA Space Weather and Climatology Program (in $millions)a

 

  Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

 

L1 50 100 100 100 25 25 25 25 25 25
L5 0 0 50 50 100 100 100 100 50 25
Earth orbiting 0 0 0 0 25 25 25 25 75 100
NASA centers 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25
Grants programb 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25
Total 100 150 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200

 

a Assumes L1 launch in year 4, $500 million over 10 years, start over year 10; assumes L5 launch year 8, $575 million over 9 years, start over year 12; assumes 5-year multi-satellite Earth orbit technology development in years 5-9, launch year 10.

b Model development, data assimilation

 

 

•   Year 3

—Conduct the build phase of an operational L1 mission.

—Begin development of a solar and solar wind monitoring mission for L5.

—Evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed new space weather clearinghouse in meeting multiagency operational forecast needs.

—Continue the grants program to test the operational readiness of space environment specification and forecasting models and coordinate with DOD and NOAA partners.

•   Year 4

—Build, integrate, and launch an operational L1 mission.

—Continue development of a solar monitoring mission for L5.

—At a NASA center, begin to integrate and distribute operational L1 measurements.

—Continue the grants program to transition to operations the environment specification and forecasting models for use by NASA and NOAA and DOD operations.

•   Year 5

—Operate the operational L1 mission, and initiate a concept study of a follow-on mission.

—Continue development of a solar monitoring mission for L5.

—Initiate a geospace monitoring mission concept study.

—At a NASA center, plan for integration of operational L5 and geospace monitoring measurements into space environment specification and forecasting models.

—Continue the grants program to facilitate a transition to operational readiness of space environment specification and forecasting models that will include new data sets as they become available.

A new plan is also needed that synthesizes and capitalizes on the strengths of the participating agencies listed above as well as opportunities in the commercial sector, such as Iridium/AMPERE. The committee sees NASA as assuming a leading role in creating a clearinghouse for coordinating the acquisition, processing, and archiving of underutilized real-time and near-real-time ground- and space-based data needed for space weather applications. For example, highly valued energetic particle measurements made by GPS and Los Alamos National Laboratory GEO satellites for specification of the radiation belts are not now routinely provided. Likewise, model development has been supported by individual agencies rather than being coordinated across relevant stakeholders.



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