References and Bibliography

Adams, W.K., Reid, S., LeMaster, R., McKagan, S.B., Perkins, K.K., Dubson, M., and Wieman. C.E. (2008a). A study of educational simulations part I—Engagement and learning. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 19(3), 397-419.

Adams, W.K., Reid, S., LeMaster, R., McKagan, S.B., Perkins, K.K., Dubson, M., and Wieman, C.E. (2008b). A study of educational simulations part II—Interface design. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 19(4), 551-577.

Anderson, J., and Barnett, G.M. (in press). Using video games to support pre-service elementary teachers learning of basic physics principles. Journal of Science Education and Technology.

Annetta, L., Minogue, J., Holmes, S.Y., and Cheng, M.-T. (2009). Investigating the impact of videogames on high school students’ engagement and learning about genetics. Computers and Education, 53(1), 74-85.

Baker, E.L., and Delacruz, G.C. (2008). A framework for the assessment of learning games. In H.F. O’Neil and R.S. Perez (Eds.), Computer games and team and individual learning (pp. 21-37). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

Baker, E.L., and Mayer, R.E. (1999). Computer-based assessment of problem solving. Computers in Human Behavior, 15, 269-282.

Banilower, E., Cohen, K., Pasley, J., and Weiss, I. (2008). Effective science instruction: What does research tell us? Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Available: http://www.centeroninstruction.org/files/Characteristics%20of%20Effective%20Science%20Instruction%20REVISED%20FINAL.pdf [accessed April 19, 2010].

Barab, S.A. (2009). The Quest Atlantis project: A 21st century curriculum. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Gaming_Sims_Commissioned_Papers.html [accessed March 16, 2010].

Barab, S.A., and Dede, C. (2007). Games and immersive participatory simulations for science education: An emerging type of curricula. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 1-3.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography Adams, W.K., Reid, S., LeMaster, R., McKagan, S.B., Perkins, K.K., Dubson, M., and Wieman. C.E. (2008a). A study of educational simulations part I—Engagement and learning. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 19(3), 397-419. Adams, W.K., Reid, S., LeMaster, R., McKagan, S.B., Perkins, K.K., Dubson, M., and Wieman, C.E. (2008b). A study of educational simulations part II—Interface design. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 19(4), 551-577. Anderson, J., and Barnett, G.M. (in press). Using video games to support pre-service elementary teachers learning of basic physics principles. Journal of Science Education and Technology. Annetta, L., Minogue, J., Holmes, S.Y., and Cheng, M.-T. (2009). Investigating the impact of videogames on high school students’ engagement and learning about genetics. Computers and Education, 53(1), 74-85. Baker, E.L., and Delacruz, G.C. (2008). A framework for the assessment of learning games. In H.F. O’Neil and R.S. Perez (Eds.), Computer games and team and individual learning (pp. 21-37). Oxford, UK: Elsevier. Baker, E.L., and Mayer, R.E. (1999). Computer-based assessment of problem solving. Computers in Human Behavior, 15, 269-282. Banilower, E., Cohen, K., Pasley, J., and Weiss, I. (2008). Effective science instruc-­ tion: What does research tell us? Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research Corporation, Center on Instruction. Available: http://www.centeroninstruction.org/files/ Characteristics%20of%20Effective%20Science%20Instruction%20REVISED%20 FINAL.pdf [accessed April 19, 2010]. Barab, S.A. (2009). The Quest Atlantis project: A 21st century curriculum. Paper commis- sioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/ bose/Gaming_Sims_Commissioned_Papers.html [accessed March 16, 2010]. Barab, S.A., and Dede, C. (2007). Games and immersive participatory simulations for science education: An emerging type of curricula. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 1-3. 

OCR for page 129
0 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Barab, S.A., Arici, A., and Jackson, C. (2005). Eat your vegetables and do your homework: A design based investigation of enjoyment and meaning in learning. Educational Technology, 45(1), 15-20. Barab, S.A., Sadler, T.D., Heiselt, C., Hickey, D., and Zuiker, S. (2007). Relating narra- tive, inquiry, and inscriptions: Supporting consequential play. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 59-82. Barman, C.R. (1999). Students’ views about scientists and school science: Engaging K-8 teachers in a national study. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 10(1), 43-54. Barnett, M., Squire, K., Higginbotham, T., and Grant, J. (2004). Electromagnetism supercharged! In Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference of the Learn-­ ing Sciences. Los Angeles: University of California Press. Barron, B. (2006). Interest and self-sustained learning as catalysts of development: A learning ecology perspective. Human Development, 49(4), 153-224. Baxter, G.P., Shavelson, R., Goldman, S.R., and Pine, J. (1992). Evaluation of procedure- based scoring for hands-on science assessment. Journal of Educational Measure-­ ment, 29(1), 1-17. Beck, I.L., McKeown, M.G., and Kucan, L. (2002). Bringing words to life: Robust vocabulary instruction. New York: Guilford Press. Behrens, J.T. (2009). Response to assessment of student learning in science simulations and games. Paper prepared for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/ Behrens_Gaming_CommissionedPaper.pdf [accessed March 23, 2010]. Behrens, J.T., Frezzo, D.C., Mislevy, R.J., Kroopnick, M., and Wise, D. (2008). Structural, Functional, and Semiotic Symmetries in Simulation-Based Games and Assess- ments. In E. Baker, J. Dickieson, W. Wulfeck, and H.F. O’Neill (Eds.), Assessment of problem solving using simulations (pp. 59-80). New York: Routledge. Bennett, R.E., Persky, H., Wiss, A. and Jenkins, F. (2007). Problem solving in tech-­ nology rich environments: A report from the NAEP technology-­based assessment project. NCES 2007-466. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Available: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo. asp?pubid=2007466 [accessed July 28, 2010]. Bewley, W., Chung, G., Delacruz, G., and Baker, E. (2009). Assessment models and tools for virtual environment training. In D. Schmorrow, J. Cohn, and D. Nicholson (Eds.), The PSI handbook of virtual environments for training and education: Developments for the military and beyond, volume 1 (pp. 300-313). Westport, CT: Greenwood. Bishop, C.M. (2006). Pattern recognition and machine learning. New York: Springer. Bloom, B.S. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives. Handbook 1: Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay. Blosser, P.E. (1990). Procedures to increase the entry of women in science-­related ca-­ reers. (ERIC/ SMEAC Science Education Digest No. 1; ERIC Identifier ED321977). Columbus OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science Mathematics and Environmental Education. Bransford, J.D., and Schwartz, D.L. (1999). Rethinking transfer: A simple proposal with multiple implications. Review of Research in Education, 24, 61-100.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography  Brown, J., Hinze, S., and Pellegrino, J.W. (2008). Technology and formative assess- ment. In T. Good (Ed.), 21st century education. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Brown, L. (1992). The new world order. In A.K. Tripathi and V.B. Bhatt (Eds.), Chang-­ ing environmental ideologies (pp.19-35). New Delhi: Ashish. Bruckman, A., Jensen, C., and DeBonte, A. (2002). Gender and programming achieve-­ ment in a CSCL environment. Paper prepared for the Conference on Computer- Supported Collaborative Learning, Boulder, CO. Bryk, A.S., and Raudenbush, S.W. (1992). Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data analysis methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage. Buckingham, D. (2007). Beyond technology: Children’s learning in the age of digital culture. Malden, MA: Polity Press. Buckingham, D., and Scanlon, M. (2002). Education, entertainment and learning in the home. London: Open University Press. Buckley, B.C., Gobert, J.D., and Horwitz, P. (2006). Using log files to track students’ model-based inquiry. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on the Learning Sciences. Bloomington, IN: International Society of the Learning Sciences. Buckley, B.C., Gobert, J., Horwitz, P., and O’Dwyer, L. (2009). Looking inside the black box: Assessing model-based learning and inquiry in BioLogica. International Journal of Learning Technology, 5(2), 166-190. Cavallo, A.M., and Laubach, T.A. (2001). Students’ science perceptions and enrollment decisions in differing learning cycle classrooms. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(9), 1,029-1,062. Chang, H.-Y. (2009). Use of critique to enhance learning with an interactive molecular visualization of thermal conductivity. In M.D. Linn (Chair), Critique to learning science. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Garden Grove, CA. Chase, C., Chin, D.B., Oppezzo, M., and Schwartz, D.L. (2009). Teachable agents and the protégé effect: Increasing the effort towards learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(4). Christensen, C.M., Horn, M.B., and Johnson, C.W. (2008). Disrupting class: How disrup-­ tive innovation will change the way the world learns. Chicago: McGraw-Hill. Clark, C., and Mayer, R. (2003). E-­Learning and the science of instruction. San Francisco: Pfeiffer. Clark, D.B. (2006). Longitudinal conceptual change in students’ understanding of thermal equilibrium: An examination of the process of conceptual restructuring. Cognition and Instruction, 24(4), 467-563. Clark, D.B., and Jorde, D. (2004). Helping students revise disruptive experientially- supported ideas about thermodynamics: Computer visualizations and tactile models. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 41(1), 1-23. Clark, D.B., and Linn, M.C. (2003). Scaffolding knowledge integration through cur- ricular depth. Journal of Learning Sciences, 12(4), 451-494. Clark, D.B., and Sampson, V.D. (2005, June). Analyzing the quality of argumenta-­ tion supported by personally-­seeded discussions. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, Taipei, Taiwan.

OCR for page 129
 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Clark, D.B., and Sampson, V.D. (2006, July). Evaluating argumentation in science: New assessment tools. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on the Learning Sciences. Bloomington, IN: International Society of the Learning Sciences. Clark, D.B., and Sampson, V.D. (2007). Personally-seeded discussions to scaffold online argumentation. International Journal of Science Education, 29(3), 253-277. Clark, D.B., and Sampson, V.D. (2008). Assessing dialogic argumentation in online environments to relate structure, grounds, and conceptual quality. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 45(3), 6. Clark, D.B., Nelson, B., Sengupta, P., and D’Angelo, C. (2009). Rethinking science learning through digital games and simulations: Genres, examples, and evi-­ dence. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7. nationalacademies.org/bose/Gaming_Sims_Commissioned_Papers.html [accessed March 23, 2010]. Clark, D.B., Nelson, B., D’Angelo, C.M., Slack, K., and Menekse, M. (2010). Connecting students’ intuitive understandings about kinematics and Newtonian mechanics into explicit formalized frameworks. Paper presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Conference, San Diego. Clarke, J., and Dede, C. (2005). Making learning meaningful: An exploratory study of using multi-­user environments (MUVEs) in middle school science. Paper prepared for the American Educational Research Association Conference, April, Montreal, Quebec. Clarke, J., and Dede, C. (2009). Robust designs for scalability. In L. Moller, J.B. Huett, and D.M. Harvey (Eds.), Learning and instructional technologies for the 21st century: Visions of the future (pp. 27-48). New York: Springer. Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt. (1990). Anchored instruction and its relationship to situated cognition. Educational Researcher, 19, 2-10. Cohen-Scali, V. (2003). The influence of family, social, and work socialization on the construction of the professional identity of young adults. Journal of Career Development, 29(4), 237-249. Colella, V. (2000). Participatory simulations: Building collaborative understanding through immersive dynamic modeling. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 9(4), 471-500. Collins, A., and Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking education in the age of technology. New York: Teachers College Press. Colzato, L.S., van Leeuwen, P.J.A., van den Wildenberg, W.P.M., and Hommel, B. (2010). DOOM’d to switch: Superior cognitive flexibility in players of first-person shooter games. Frontiers in Psychology, 1, 1-5. Cooper, M.M., and Stevens, R. (2008). Reliable multi-method assessment of meta- cognition use in chemistry problem solving. Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 9, 18-24. Crowley, K., and Jacobs, M. (2002). Islands of expertise and the development of family scientific literacy. In G. Leinhardt, K. Crowley, and K. Knutson (Eds.), Learning conversations in museums. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Cuadros, J., and Yaron, D. (2007). “One firm spot”: The role of homework as a lever in acquiring conceptual and performance competence in college chemistry. Journal of Chemical Education, 84(6), 1,047-1,052.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography  Culp, K.M. (2009). Response to: Learning context: Gaming, simulations, and sci-­ ence learning in the classroom. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Culp_Gaming_Presentation. pdf [accessed March 23, 2010]. Day, S.B., and Goldstone, R.L. (2009). Analogical transfer from interaction with a simulated physical system. In Proceedings of the Thirty-­First Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1,406-1,411). Amsterdam: Cognitive Science Society. Available: http://cognitrn.psych.indiana.edu/rgoldsto/pdfs/day09.pdf [accessed February 22, 2010]. Dede, C. (2005). Why design-based research is both important and difficult. Educa-­ tional Technology, 45(1), 5-8. Dede, C. (2006). Online professional development for teachers: Emerging models and methods. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. Dede, C. (2009a). Immersive interfaces for engagement and learning. Science, 323(5910), 66-69. Dede, C. (2009b). Technologies that facilitate generating knowledge and possibly wisdom: A response to “Web 2.0 and classroom research.” Educational Researcher, 38(4), 60-63. Dede, C. (2009c). Learning context: Gaming, gaming simulations, and science learn-­ ing in the classroom. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Dede_Gaming_CommissionedPaper. pdf [accessed February 2011]. Dede, C., and Ketelhut, D.J. (2003). Designing for motivation and usability in a museum-­based multi-­user virtual environment. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Conference, Chicago. Dede, C., Ketelhut, D.J., and Ruess, K. (2002). Motivation, usability, and learning outcomes in a prototype museum-based multi-user virtual environment. In Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on the Learning Sciences (pp. 406-408). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Dede, C., Honan, J., and Peters. L. (Eds). (2005). Scaling up success: Lessons learned from technology-­based educational innovation. New York: Jossey-Bass. de Jong, T. (2005). The guided discovery principle in multimedia learning. In R.E. Mayer (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of multimedia learning (pp. 215-228). New York: Cambridge University Press. de Jong, T. (2006). Technological advances in inquiry learning. Science, 312, 532-533. Available: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/312/5773/532 [accessed March 3, 2010]. de Jong, T. (2009). Learning with computer simulations: Evidence and future directions. Presentation to the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simula- tions, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies. org/bose/deJong_Gaming_Presentation.pdf [accessed February 15, 2011]. DeVane, B., Durga, S., and Squire, K.D. (2009). Competition as a driver for learning. International Journal of Learning and Media, 1(2). Dieterle, E. (2009). Neomillennial learning styles and River City. Children, Youth and Environments, 19(1), 245278.

OCR for page 129
4 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Dieterle, E., Dede, C., Clarke, J., Dukas, G., Garduño, E., and Ketelhut, D.J. (2008). Formative assessments integrated into a MUVE that provides real-­time feedback for teachers on student learning. Paper presented at the 2008 American Educational Research Association Conference, New York, NY. Digital Youth Network. (2010). Current research projects. Available: http://iremix. org/3-research/pages/5-current-research-findings [accessed March 17, 2010]. diSessa, A.A. (1993). Toward an epistemology of physics. Cognition and Instruction, 10(2-3), 105-225. diSessa, A.A., Hammer, D.M., Sherin, B., and Kolpakowski, T. (1991). Inventing graphing: Children‘s meta-representational expertise. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 10(2), 117. Doerr, H. (1996). Integrating the study of trigonometry, vectors, and force through modeling. School Science and Mathematics, 96, 407-418. Dunleavy, M., Dede, C., and Mitchell, R. (2009). Affordances and limitations of im- mersive participatory augmented reality simulations for teaching and learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(1 February), 7-22. Durkin, K. (2006). Game playing and adolescents’ development. In P. Vorderer and J. Bryant (Eds.), Playing video games: Motives, responses, and consequences (pp. 415-428). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Duschl, R. (2004). The HS lab experience: Reconsidering the role of evidence, ex-­ planation, and the language of science. Paper prepared for the Committee on High School Science Laboratories: Role and Vision. Available: http://www7. nationalacademies.org/bose/July_12-13_2004_High_School_Labs_Meeting_ Agenda.html [accessed December 14, 2004]. Dye, M.W.G., Green, C.S., and Bavelier, D. (2009). Increasing speed of processing with action video games. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18(6), 321-326. Edelson, D.C., Gordin, D.N., and Pea, R.D. (1999). Addressing the challenges of inquiry-based learning through technology and curriculum design. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 8(3/4), 391-450. Edelson, D.C., Salierno, C., Matese, G., Pitts, V., and Sherin, B. (2002). Learning-­for-­ use in earth science: Kids as climate modelers. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, New Orleans, April. Entertainment Software Association. (2010). Industry facts. Available: http://www. theesa.com/facts/index.asp [accessed April 19, 2010]. Evans, K.L., Yaron, D., and Leinhardt, G. (2008). Learning stoichiometry: A comparison of text and multimedia formats. Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 9, 208-218. Available: http://oli.web.cmu.edu/openlearning/publications/110 [ac- cessed September 23, 2010]. Falk, J., and Drayton, B. (Eds.). (2009). Creating and sustaining online professional learning communities. New York: Teachers College Press. Federation of American Scientists. (2007). Harnessing the power of video games for learning. Washington, DC: Author. Available: http://www.fas.org/gamesummit/ Resources/Summit%20on%20Educational%20Games.pdf [accessed January 2010].

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography  Fletcher, J.D. (2009a). Education and training technology in the military. Science, 323, 72-75. Available: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/reprint/sci;323/5910/72. pdf?ck=nck [accessed February 23, 2010]. Fletcher, J.D. (2009b).Training via simulations and games. Presentation to the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Fletcher_ Gaming_Presentation.pdf [accessed February 23, 2010]. Frederiksen, J.R., White, B.Y., and Gutwill, J. (1999). Dynamic mental models in learning science: The importance of constructing derivational linkages among models. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 36(7), 806-836. Frezzo, D.C., Behrens, J.T., and Mislevy, R.J. (in press). Design patterns for learning and assessment: Facilitating the introduction of a complex simulation-based learning environment into a community of instructors. Journal of Science Edu-­ cation and Technology. Gershenfeld, A. (2009). Bringing game-­based learning to scale: The business challenges of serious games. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Work- shop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http:// www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Gershenfeld_Gaming_CommissionedPaper. pdf [accessed April 12, 2010]. Giacquinta, J.B., Bauer, J.A., and Levin, J.E. (1993). Beyond technology’s promise: An examination of children’s educational computing in the home. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Gibson, H., and Chase, C. (2002). Longitudinal impact of an inquiry-based science program on middle school students’ attitudes toward science. Science Educa-­ tion, 86(5), 693-705. Goldman, K.H., Koepfler, J., and Yocco, V. (2009). WolfQuest summative evaluation: Full summative report. Edgewater, MD: Institute for Learning Innovation. Avail- able: http://www.informalscience.org/reports/0000/0206/WQ_Full_Summative_ Report.pdf [accessed April 26, 2010]. Green, C.S., and Bavelier, D. (2006). Effect of action video games on the spatial dis- tribution of visuospatial attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 32(6), 1,465-1,468. Grigg, W.S., Lauko, M.A., and Brockway, D.M. (2006). The nation’s report card: Sci-­ ence 2005. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Hamilton, L. (2003). Assessment as a policy tool. Review of Research in Education, 27, 25-68. Hattie, J., Jaeger, R., and Bond, L. (1999). Persistent methodological questions in educational testing. Review of Research in Education, 24, 393-446. Hansen, E.G., Zapata-Rivera, D., and Feng, M. (2009). Beyond accessibility: Evidence centered design for improving the efficiency of learning-­centered assessments. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education, April 16, San Diego. Hayes, E.R., and King, E.M. (2009). Not just a dollhouse: What The Sims2 can teach us about women’s IT learning. On The Horizon, 17(1), 60-69. Hays, R.T. (2005). The effectiveness of instructional games: A literature review and discussion. (Technical Report No. 2005-004). Orlando, FL: Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division.

OCR for page 129
 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Henderson, C., and Dancy, M.H. (2009). Impact of physics education research on the teaching of introductory quantitative physics in the United States. Physical Review Special Topics—Physics Education Research, 5(2). Available: http://prst-per.aps. org/pdf/PRSTPER/v5/i2/e020107 [accessed May 3, 2010]. Hickey, D., Ingram-Goble, A., and Jameson, E. (2009). Designing assessments and assessing designs in virtual educational environments. Journal of Science Educa-­ tion and Technology, 18(2), 187-208. Hickey, D.T., Kindfield, A.C.H., Horwitz, P., and Christie, M.A.T. (2003). Integrating curriculum, instruction, assessment, and evaluation in a technology-supported genetics learning environment. American Educational Research Journal, 40(2), 495-538. Hight, J. (2009). Challenges of bringing gaming and simulations to scale for sci-­ ence learning. Presentation to the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http:// www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Hight_Gaming_Presentation.pdf [accessed March 23, 2010]. Hmelo-Silver, C. E., Marathe, S., and Liu, L. (2007). Fish swim, rocks sit, and lungs breathe: Expert-novice understanding of complex systems. Journal of the Learn-­ ing Sciences, 16, 307-331. Hmelo-Silver, C.E., Jordan, R., Liu, L., Gray, S., Demeter, M., Rugaber, S.V., and Goel, A. (2008). Focusing on function: Thinking below the surface of complex natural systems. Science Scope, 27-34. Available: http://dilab.gatech.edu/publications/ Science-Scope-Paper.pdf [accessed February 2011]. Holbert, N. (2009). Learning Newton while crashing cars. Poster presented at the Games Learning Society Conference, Madison, WI, June, 10-12. Horst, H. (2009). Families. In the John D. and Catherine MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning, M. Ito et al. (Eds.), Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Horwitz, P. (2009). Interactive curriculum and assessment: The road to scaling? Pre- sentation to the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simula- tions, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies. org/bose/Horwitz_Gaming_Presentation.pdf [accessed March 23, 2010]. Horwitz, P., Gobert, J., Buckley, B.C., and Wilensky, U. (2007). Modeling across the curriculum: Annual report to NSF. Concord, MA: The Concord Consortium. Ito, M. (2009). Sociocultural contexts of game-­based learning. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, Octo- ber 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/ Gaming_Sims_Commissioned_Papers.html [accessed March 12, 2010]. Ito, M., and Bittanti, M. (2009). Gaming. In the John D. and Catherine MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning, M. Ito et al. (Eds.), Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Ito, M., Bittanti, M., Boyd, D., Cody, R., Herr-Stephenson, B., Horst, H.A., Lange, P.G., Mahendran, D., Martinez, K.Z., Pascoe, C.J., Perkel, D., Robinson, L., Sims, C., Tripp, L., et al. (2009). Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography  Jenkins, H., Squire, K., and Tan, P. (2004). You can’t bring that game to school! Designing supercharged! In B. Laurel (Ed.), Design research. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Kadlec, A., and Friedman, W. (2007). Important but not for me: Parents and students in Kansas and Missouri talk about math, science, and technology education. New York: Public Agenda. Available: http://www.publicagenda.org/reports/ important-not-me [accessed January 2010]. Kafai, Y.B. (2009). State of evidence: How can games and simulations be used to increase science learning? Presentation to the National Research Council Work- shop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Kafai_Gaming_Presentation.pdf [ac- cessed March 23, 2010]. Kafai, Y.B., and Fields, D.A. (2009). Cheating in virtual worlds: Transgressive designs for learning. On the Horizon, 17(1), 12-20. Kafai, Y.B., Heeter, C., Denner, J., and Sun, J.Y (Eds.). (2008). Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat: New perspectives on gender and gaming. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Kafai, Y.B., Quintero, M., and Feldon, D. (2010). Investigating the “why” in Whypox: Casual and systematic explorations of a virtual epidemic. Games and Culture, 5(1), 116-135. Kafai, Y.B., Feldon, D., Fields, D., Giang, M., and Quintero, M. (in press). Life in the times of Whypox: A virtual epidemic as a community event. In C. Steinfeld, B. Pentland, M. Ackermann, and N. Contractor (Eds.), Proceedings of the Third Inter-­ national Conference on Communities and Technology. New York: Springer. Kahne, J., Middaugh, E., and Evans, C. (2009). The civic potential of video games. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Kali, Y., Linn, M.C., and Roseman, J.E. (2008). Designing coherent science educa-­ tion: Implications for curriculum, instruction, and policy. New York: Teachers College Press. Keller, C.J., Finkelstein, N.D., Perkins, K.K., and Pollock, S.J. (2006). Assessing the effectiveness of a computer simulation in introductory undergraduate environ-­ ments. Paper presented at the 2006 Physics Education Research Conference, July 26-27, Syracuse, NY. Ketelhut, D.J. (2007). The impact of student self-efficacy on scientific inquiry skills: An Exploratory investigation in River City, a multi-user virtual environment. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 99-111. Ketelhut, D.J. (2009). Rethinking science learning, a needs assessment. Paper com- missioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simula- tions, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies. org/bose/Ketelut_Gaming_CommissionedPaper.pdf [accessed October, 2010]. Ketelhut, D.J., Dede, C., Clarke J., and Nelson, B. (2006). A multi-­user virtual environ-­ ment for building higher order inquiry skills in science. Paper presented at the 2006 AERA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, April. Available: http://muve. gse.harvard.edu/rivercityproject/documents/rivercitysympinq1.pdf [accessed March 2009].

OCR for page 129
 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Ketelhut, D.J., Dede, C., Clarke, J., Nelson, B., and Bowman, C. (2007). Studying situated learning in a multiuser virtual environment. In E. Baker, J. Dickieson, W. Wulfeck, and H.F. O’Neil (Eds.), Assessment of problem solving using simula-­ tions. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum. Ketelhut, D.J., Dede, C., Clarke, J., Nelson, B., and Bowman, C. (in press). Studying situated learning in a multi-user virtual environment. In E. Baker, J. Dickieson, W. Wulfeck, and H. O’Neil (Eds.), Assessment of problem solving using simula-­ tions. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Kirkpatrick, D.L. (1994). Evaluating training programs: The four levels. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler. Klopfer, E. (2008). Augmented reality: Research and design of mobile educational games. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Klopfer, E., Yoon, S., and Rivas, L. (2004). Comparative analysis of palm and wearable computers for participatory simulations. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 20, 347-359. Klopfer, E., Yoon, S., and Um, T. (2005). Teaching complex dynamic systems to young students with StarLogo. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 24(2), 157-178. Available: http://dl.aace.org/16982. Klopfer, E., Scheintaub, H., Huang, W., Wendal, D., and Roque, R. (2009). The simulation cycle: Combining games, simulations, engineering and science using StarLogo TNG. E-­Learning, 6(1), 71-96. Kopriva, R., Gabel, D., and Bauman, J. (2009). Building comparable computer-­based science items for English learners: Results and insights from the ONPAR project. Paper presented at the National Conference on Student Assessment (NCSA), Los Angeles, CA. Kraiger, K., Ford, J., and Salas, E. (1993). Application of cognitive, skill-based, and affective theories of learning outcomes to new methods of training evaluation. Journal of Applied Psychology, 78(2), 311-328. Krajcik, J., Marx, R., Blumenfeld, P., Soloway, E., and Fishman, B. (2000, April). Inquiry-­based science supported by technology: Achievement and motivation among urban middle school students. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans. Kutner, L., and Olson, C.K. (2008). Grand theft childhood: The surprising truth about violent video games and what parents can do. New York: Simon & Schuster. Lareau, A. (2003). Unequal childhoods; Class, race, and family life. Berkeley: Uni- versity of California Press. Lesgold, A. (2001). The nature and methods of learning by doing. American Psychologist, 56(11), 964-973. Lesgold, A.M., Lajoie, S.P., Bunzo, M., and Eggan, G. (1992). SHERLOCK: A coached practice environment for an electronics troubleshooting job. In J. Larkin and R. Chabay (Eds.), Computer-­assisted instruction and intelligent tutoring systems: Shared issues and complementary approaches (pp. 201-238). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Lewis, E.L., Stern, J., and Linn, M.C. (1993). The effect of computer simulations on introductory thermodynamics understanding. Educational Technology, 33(1), 45-58.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography  Li, R., Polat, U., Makous, W., and Bavelier, D. (2009). Enhancing the contrast sensi- tivity function through action video game training. Nature Neuroscience, 2296. Available: http://www.bcs.rochester.edu/people/Daphne/Li_NN.pdf [accessed February 22, 2010]. Lindgren, R., and Schwartz, D.L. (2009). Spatial learning and computer simulations in science. International Journal of Science Education, 31(3), 419-438. Linn, M.C. and Eylon, B.-S. (in press). Science learning and instruction: Taking advan-­ tage of technology to promote knowledge integration. New York: Routledge. Linn, M.C., and Hsi, S. (2000). Computers, teachers, peers: Science learning partners. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Linn, M.C., Chang, H-Y., Chiu, J., Zhang, H., and McElhaney, K. (2010). Can desir- able difficulties overcome deception clarity in scientific visualizations? In A.S. Benjamin (Ed.) Successful remembering and successful forgetting: A Festschrift in honor of Robert A. Bjork. New York: Routledge. Linn, M.D., Lewis, C., Tsuchida, I., and Songer, N.B. (2000). Beyond fourth-grade science: Why do U.S. and Japanese students diverge? Educational Researcher, 29(3), 4-14. Linn, R. (1998). Validating inferences from National Assessment of Educational Progress achievement-level reporting. Applied Measurement in Education, 11(1), 23-47. Ma, J., and Nickerson, J.V. (2006). Hands-on, simulated, and remote laboratories: A comparative literature review. ACM Computing Surveys, 38(3), 1-24. Ma, X., and Ma, L. (2004). Modeling stability of growth between mathematics and science achievement during middle and high school. Evaluation Review, 28(2), 104-122. Ma, X., and Wilkins, J.L. (2002). The development of science achievement in middle and high schools: Individual differences and school effects. Evaluation Review, 26(4), 395-417. Mandinach, E., and Cline, H. (1993). Systems, science and schools. System Dynamics Review, 9(2), 195-206. Martin, J., and VanLehn, K. (1995). Student assessment using Bayesian nets. Interna-­ tional Journal of Human-­Computer Studies, 42, 575-591. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Future Civic Media. (2010). TimeLab 2100. Available: http://civic.mit.edu/projects/c4fcm/timelab-2100 [accessed February 4, 2010]. Mayer, R.C. (2004). Should there be a three-strikes rule against pure discovery learn- ing? The case for guided methods of instruction. American Psychologist, 59(1), 14-19. Mayer, R.E., Mautone, P., and Prothero, W. (2002). Pictorial aids for learning by doing in a multimedia geology simulation game. Journal of Educational Psychology, 94, 171-185. Mayo, M.J. (2009a). Video games: A route to large-scale STEM education? Science, 323. Available: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/323/5910/79 [ac- cessed April 5, 2010].

OCR for page 129
40 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Mayo, M.J. (2009b). Bringing game-­based learning to scale: The business challenges of serious gaming. Paper presented at the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7. nationalacademies.org/bose/Mayo_Gaming_CommissionedPaper.pdf [accessed April 5, 2010]. McQuiggan, S.W., Robison, J.L., and Lester, J.C. (2008). Affective transitions in narrative-­centered learning environments. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Intelligent Tutoring Systems, Montreal, Canada. Meir, E., Perry, J., Stal, D., Maruca, S., and Klopfer, E. (2005). How effective are simulated molecular1 level experiments for teaching diffusion and osmosis? Cell Biology Education, 4, 235-248. Messick, S. (1994). The interplay of evidence and consequences in the validation of performance assessments. Educational Researcher, 32, 13-23. Metcalf, S.J., Clarke, J. and Dede, C. (2009). Virtual worlds for education: River city and EcoMUVE. Paper presented at the Media in Transition International Confer- ence, MIT, April 24-26, Cambridge, MA. Meyer, A., and Rose, D.H. (2005). The future is in the margins: The role of technology and disability in educational reform. In D.H. Rose, A. Meyer, and C. Hitchcock (Eds.), The universally designed classroom: Accessible curriculum and digital technologies (pp. 13-35). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. Mitchell, T.M. (1997). Machine Learning. New York: McGraw-Hill. Miller, J.D. (1998). The measurement of civic scientific literacy. Public Understanding of Science, 7(3), 203-223. Miller, J.D. (2001). The acquisition and retention of scientific information by American adults. In J.H. Falk (Ed.), Free-­choice science education: How we learn science outside of school (pp. 93-114). New York: Teachers College Press. Miller, J.D. (2002). Civic scientific literacy: A necessity for the 21st century. Public Interest Report: Journal of the Federation of American Scientists, 55(1), 3-6. Miller, J.D., Pardo, R., and Niwa, F. (1997). Public perceptions of science and technol-­ ogy: A comparative study of the European Union, the United States, Japan, and Canada. Madrid: BBV Foundation Press. Mislevy, R.J., and Gitomer, D.H. (1996). The role of probability-based inference in an intelligent tutoring system. User-­Modeling and User-­Adapted Interaction, 5, 253-282. Mislevy, R.J., Chudowsky, N., Draney, K., Fried, R., Gaffney, T., Haertel, G., Hafter, A., Hamel, L., Kennedy, C., Long, K., Morrison, A.L., Murphy, R., Pena, P., Quellmalz, E., Rosenquist, A., Songer, N., Schank, P., Wenk, A., and Wilson, M. (2003). Design patterns for assessing science inquiry (PADI Technical Report 1). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International, Center for Technology in Learning. Moreno, R., and Mayer, R.E. (2000). Engaging students in active learning: The case for personalized multimedia messages. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92, 724-733. Moreno, R., and Mayer, R.E. (2004). Personalized messages that promote science learn- ing in virtual environments. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96, 165-173.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography 4 Moreno, R., and Mayer, R.E. (2005). Role of guidance, reflection, and interactivity in an agent-based multimedia game. Journal of Educational Psychology, 97, 117-128. Moreno, R., and Mayer, R.E. (2007). Interactive multimodal learning environments. Educational Psychology Review, 19(3), 309-326. Motion Picture Association of America. (2010). Research and statistics. Available: http://www.mpaa.org/researchStatistics.asp [accessed April 19, 2010]. National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. (2007). Rising above the gathering storm: Energizing and employing America for a brighter economic future. Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century: An Agenda for American Science and Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Center for Education Statistics. (2007). Special Analysis 2007: High school coursetaking. Table SA-4C. Available: http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2007/ analysis/sa_table.asp?tableID=825 [accessed February 24, 2010]. National Research Council. (2000). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school: Expanded edition. Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning with additional material from the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council. (2001). Knowing what students know: The science and design of educational assessment. Committee on the Foundations of Assess- ment, J.W. Pellegrino, N. Chudowsky, and R.G. Glaser (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council. (2002). Performance assessments for adult education: Exploring the measurement issues, Report of a workshop. Committee for the Workshop on Alternatives for Assessing Adult Education and Literacy Programs, R. J. Mislevy and K.T. Knowles (Eds.). Board on Testing and Assessment, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Wash- ington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Research Council. (2004). Engaging schools: Fostering high school students’ motivation to learn. Committee on Increasing High School Students’ Engagement and Motivation to Learn. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Research Council. (2005a). How students learn: History, mathematics, and science in the classroom. Committee on How People Learn, A Targeted Report for Teachers, Center for Studies on Behavior and Development. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Research Council (2005b). America’s lab report: Investigations in high school science. Committee on High School Science Laboratories: Role and Vision, S.R. Singer, M.L. Hilton, and H.A. Schweingruber (Eds.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Research Council. (2006). Systems for state science assessment. Committee on Test Design for K-12 Science Achievement, M.R. Wilson and M.W. Bertenthal (Eds.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Research Council. (2007). Taking science to school: Teaching and learning science in grades K-­8. Committee on Science Learning, Kindergarten Through Eighth Grade, R.A. Duschl, H.A. Schweingruber, and A.W. Shouse (Eds.). Wash- ington, DC: The National Academies Press.

OCR for page 129
4 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations National Research Council. (2009). Learning science in informal environments: People, places, and pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments, P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Research Council. (2010). The rise of games and high-­performance computing for modeling and simulation. Committee on Modeling, Simulation, and Games. Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Nelson, B. (2007). Exploring the use of individualized, reflective guidance in an educational multi-user virtual environment. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 83-97. Neulight, N., Kafai, Y.B., Kao, L., Foley, B., and Galas, C. (2007). Children’s par- ticipation in a virtual epidemic in the science classroom: Making connections to natural infectious diseases. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 47-58. Nichols, S., and Berliner, D. (2008a). Why has high-stakes testing so easily slipped into contemporary American life? Phi Delta Kappan, 89(9), 672-676. Nichols, S., and Berliner, D. (2008b). Testing the joy out of learning. Educational Leadership, 65(6), 14-18. Nulty, A., and Shaffer, D.W. (2008). Digital zoo: The effects of mentoring on young engineers. Paper presented at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS), Utrecht, Netherlands. O’Neil, H.F., Wainess, R., and Baker, E.L. (2005). Classification of learning out- comes: Evidence from the computer games literature. Curriculum Journal, 16, 455-474. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2007). Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006: Science competencies for tomorrow’s world (vol. I). Paris: Author. Available: http://www.oecd.org/ document/2/0,3343,en_32252351_32236191_39718850_1_1_1_1,00.html [accessed July 28, 2010]. Osterweil, S. (2009). Bringing game-­based learning to scale: A response. Paper commis- sioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/ bose/Osterweil_Gaming_CommissionedPaper.pdf [accessed April 12, 2010]. Parnafes, O. (2007). What does “fast” mean? Understanding the physical world through computational representations. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 16(3), 415-450. Partnership for Reform in Science and Mathematics. (2005). Georgia students rank parents as primary influencers in student success. Available: http://www.gaprism. org/media/news/112905.pdf [accessed January 2010]. Pew Research Center and American Association for the Advancement of Science. (2009). Public praises science, scientists fault public, media; a survey. Available: http://people-press.org/reports/pdf/528.pdf [accessed September 27, 2009]. Pitaru, A. (2008). E is for everyone: The case for inclusive game design. In K. Salen (Ed.), The ecology of games: Connecting youth, games, and learning (pp. 67-88). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography 4 Plass, J.L., Homer, B.D., Milne, C., Jordan, T., Kim, M., and Barrientos, J. (2007). Representational mode and cognitive load: Optimizing the instructional design of science simulations. Featured research paper presented at the annual con- vention of the Association for Educational Communication and Technology, October, Anaheim, CA. Plass, J.L., Homer, B.D., and Hayward, E.O. (2009). Design factors for educationally effective animations and simulations. Journal of Computing in Higher Educa-­ tion, 21, 31-61. Plass, J.L., Goldman, R., Flanagan, M., and Perlin, K. (2009). RAPUNSEL: Improving self-efficacy and self-esteem with an educational computer game. In S.C. Kong, H. Ogata, H.C. Amseth, C.K.K. Chan, T. Hirashama, F. Klett, J.H.M. Lee, C.C. Liu, C.K. Looi, M. Milrad, A. Mitrovic, K. Nakabayashi, S.L. Wong, and S.J.H. Yang (Eds.), Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computers in Educa-­ tion (CDROM). Hong Kong: Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education. Project Tomorrow and PASCO Scientific. (2008). Inspiring the next generation of innovators: Students, parents, and teachers speak up about science education. Irvine, CA: Author. Available: http://www.tomorrow.org/SpeakUp/pdfs/Inspiring_ the_next_generation_of_innovators.pdf [accessed February 3, 2010]. Quellmalz, E.S., and Haertel, G. (2004). Technology supports for state science assess-­ ment systems. Paper commissioned by the National Research Council Committee on Test Design for K-12 Science Achievement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Quellmalz, E.S., and Haertel, G.D. (2008). Assessing new literacies in science and mathematics. In D.J. Leu, Jr., J. Coiro, M. Knowbel, and C. Lankshear (Eds.), Handbook of research on new literacies. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Quellmalz, E.S., and Pellegrino, J.W. (2009). Technology and testing. Science, 323, 75-79. Quellmalz, E.S., DeBarger, A., Haertel, G., and Kreikemeier, P. (2005). Validities of science inquiry assessments: Final report. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International. Quellmalz, E.S., DeBarger, A.H., Haertel, G., Schank, P., Buckley, B., Gobert, J., Horwitz, P., and Ayala, C. (2008). Exploring the role of technology-­based simula-­ tions in science assessment: The Calipers Project. Presented at American Edu- cational Research Association (AERA) 2007, Chicago, IL. In Science assessment: Research and practical approaches. Arlington, VA: NSTA. Quellmalz, E.S., Timms, M.J., and Schneider, S.A. (2009). Assessment of student learning in science simulations and games. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Schneider_Gaming_Com- missionedPaper.pdf [accessed March 23, 2010]. Quellmalz, E.S., Timms, M.J., and Buckley, B.C. (in press). The promise of simulation- based science assessment: The calipers project. International Journal of Learning Technologies. Raghavan, K., and Glaser, R. (1995). Model-based analysis and reasoning in science: The MARS curriculum. Science Education, 79(1), 37-61. Resnick, M., Rusk, N., and Cooke, S. (1998). The Computer Clubhouse: Technological fluency in the inner city. In D. Schon, B. Sanyal, and W. Mitchell (Eds.), High technology and low-­income communities. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

OCR for page 129
44 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Resnick, M., Maloney, J., Monroy-Hernandez, A., Rusk, N., Eastmond, E., Brennan, K., Millner, A., Rosenbaum, E., Silver, J., Silverman, B., and Kafai, Y. (2009). Scratch: Programming for all. Communications of the ACM, 52(11), 60-67. Richards, J., Barowy, W., and Levin, D. (1992). Computer simulation in the science classroom. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 1(1), 67-79. Rideout, V.G., Foehr, U.G., and Roberts, D.F. (2010). Generation M2: Media in the lives of 8-­ to 18-­year-­olds. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation. Available: http://www.kff.org/entmedia/upload/8010.pdf [accessed January 2010]. Rieber, L.P., Tzeng, S., and Tribble, K. (2004). Discovery learning, representation, and explanation within a computer-based simulation. Computers and Educa-­ tion, 27(1), 45-58. Roberts, D.F., and Foehr, U.G. (2008). Trends in media use. The Future of Children, 18(1), 11-37. Robison, J., McQuiggan, S., and Lester, J. (2009). Evaluating the consequences of affec-­ tive feedback in intelligent tutoring systems. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interac- tion, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Rogers, C., and Portsmore, M. (2004). Engineering in the elementary school. Journal of STEM Education, 5(3/4), 17-28. Roschelle, J. (1991). Students’ construction of qualitative physics knowledge: Learning about velocity and acceleration in a computer microworld. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, Berkeley. Roschelle, J. (2003). Unlocking the learning value of wireless mobile devices. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 19(3), 260-272. Roschelle, J., Patton, C., and Tatar, D. (2007). Designing networked handheld devices to enhance school learning. In M. Zelkowitz (Ed.), Advances in computers (vol. 70, pp. 1-60). Burlington, MA: Academic Press. Rosenbaum, E., Klopfer, E., and Perry, J. (2006). On location learning: Authentic applied science with networked augmented realities. Journal of Science Educa-­ tion and Technology, 16(1), 31-45. Rothberg, M.A., Sandberg, S., and Awerbuch, T.E. (1994). Educational software for simulating risk of HIV infection. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 3(1), 65-70. Sandoval, W.A. (2003). Conceptual and epistemic aspects of students’ scientific ex- planations. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 12(1), 5-51. Sandoval, W.A., and Reiser, B.J. (2004).Explanation-driven inquiry: Integrating con- ceptual and epistemic scaffolds for scientific inquiry. Science Education, 88, 345-372. Scalise, K., Timms, M., Clark, L., and Moorjani, A. (2009). Student learning in science simulations: What makes a difference? Paper presented at the Session on “Con- versation, Argumentation, and Engagement and Science Learning,” American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, April 14, San Diego, CA. Schaller, D.T., Goldman, K.H., Spikelmeier, G., Allison-Bunnell, S., and Koepfer, J. (2009). Learning in the wild: What WolfQuest taught developers and game players. In J. Trant and D. Bearman (Eds.), Museums and the web 2009: Proceedings. Toronto: Archives and Museum Informatics. Available: http://www.archimuse. com/mw2009/papers/schaller/schaller.html [accessed February 24, 2010].

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography 4 Schwartz, D.L., Bransford, J.D., and Sears, D. (2005). Efficiency and innovation in transfer. In J.P. Mestre (Ed.), Transfer of learning from a multidisciplinary per-­ spective (pp. 1-51). Greenwich, CT: Information Age. Schwartz, D.L., Chase, C., Chin, C., Oppezzo, M., Kwong, H., Okita, S., Biswas, G., Roscoe, R.D., Jeong, H., and Wagster, J.D. (2007). Interactive metacognition: Monitoring and regulating a teachable agent. In D.J. Hacker, J. Dunlosky, and A.C. Graesser (Eds.), Handbook of Metacognition and Education. New York: Routledge. Schwarz, C., and White, B. (2005). Meta-modeling knowledge: Developing students’ understanding of scientific modeling. Cognition and Instruction, 23(2), 165-205. Schwarz, C., Meyer, J., and Sharma, A. (2007). Technology, pedagogy, and epistemol - ogy: Opportunities and challenges of using computer modeling and simulation tools in elementary science methods. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 18(2), 243-269. Seiter, E. (2005). The Internet playground: Children’s access, entertainment, and mis-­education. New York: Peter Lang. Seiter, E. (2007). Practicing at home: Computers, pianos, and cultural capital. In T. McPherson (Ed.), Digital youth, innovation, and the unexpected. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Sengupta, P., and Wilensky, U. (2006) NIELS: An agent-­based modeling environment for learning electromagnetism. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco. Sengupta, P., and Wilensky, U. (2008a). Designing across ages: On the low-­threshold-­ high-­ceiling nature of NetLogo based learning environments. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA 2008), New York. Sengupta, P., and Wilensky, U. (2008b). On the learnability of electricity as a complex system. In M. Jacobson (Chair) and R. Noss (Discussant), Complex systems and learning: Empirical research, issues and “seeing” scientific knowledge with new eyes. In Proceedings of the International Conference for the Learning Sciences. Sengupta, P., and Wilensky, U. (2009). Learning electricity with NIELS: Thinking with electrons and thinking in levels. International Journal of Computers for Mathematical Learning, 14(1), 21-50. Shaffer, D. (2006). Epistemic frames for epistemic games. Computers and Education, 46(3), 223-234. Shaul, M.S., and Ganson, H.C. (2005). The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001: The federal government’s role in strengthening accountability for student performance. Review of Research in Education, 29, 151-165. Shepard, L.A. (1997). Children not ready to learn? The invalidity of school readiness testing. Psychology in the Schools, 34(2), 85-97. Shepard, L.A. (2002). The hazards of high-stakes testing. Issues in Science and Tech-­ nology, 19(2), 53.

OCR for page 129
4 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations Shute, V.J., Masduki,I., Donmez, O., Dennen, V.P., Kim, Y.-J., Jeong, A.C., and Wang, C.-Y. (2009). Modeling, assessing, and supporting key competencies within game environments. In D. Ifenthaler, P. Pirnay-Dummer, and N.M. Seel (Eds.), Computer-­based diagnostics and systematic analysis of knowledge (pp. 281-310). New York: Springer-Verlag. Sloane, F., and Kelly, A. (2003). Issues in high-stakes testing programs. Theory Into Practice, 42(1), 12-17. Smith, M., and Fey, P. (2000). Validity and accountability in high-stakes testing. Journal of Teacher Education, 51(5), 334-344. Son, J.Y., and Goldstone, R.L. (2009). Fostering general transfer with specific simula- tions. Pragmatics and Cognition, 17, 1-42. Songer, N.B. (2009). Design principles for deep thinking about science with simulations. Presentation to the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simula- tions, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies. org/bose/Songer_Gaming_Presentation.pdf [accessed March 23, 2010]. Songer, N.B., Kelcey, B., and Gotwals, A.W. (2009). How and when does complex rea-­ soning occur: Empirically driven development of a learning progression focused on complex reasoning about biodiversity. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Education Research Association, San Diego, April. Available: http://www.biokids.umich.edu/papers/songerkelceygotwalsAERA4.09.pdf [ac - cessed March 10, 2010]. Squire, K. (2008a). Open-ended video games: A model for developing learning in the interactive age. In K. Salen (Ed.), The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation series on digital media and learning (pp. 167-198). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Squire, K. (2008b). Designing centers of expertise for academic learning through video games. Theory Into Practice, 47(3), 240-251. Squire, K., and Durga, S. (in press). Productive gaming: The case for historiographic game play. In R. Ferdig (Ed.), The handbook of educational gaming. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference. Squire, K., and Klopfer, E. (2007). Augmented reality simulations on handheld com- puters. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 16(3), 371-413. Squire, K., and Patterson, N. (2009). Games and simulations in informal science education. Paper commissioned for the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7. nationalacademies.org/bose/Gaming_Sims_Commissioned_Papers.html [accessed March 12, 2010]. Squire, K.D. (2010). From information to experience: Place-based augmented reality games as a model for learning in a globally networked society. Teachers College Record, 112(10), 4-5. Squire, K.D., and Jan, M. (2007). Mad City Mystery: Developing scientific argumenta- tion skills with a place-based augmented reality game on handheld computers. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1) 5-29. Squire, K.D., DeVane, B., and Durga, S. (in press). Designing centers of expertise for academic learning through video games. Theory Into Practice. Steinkuehler, C. (2006). Virtual worlds, learning, and the new pop cosmopolitanism. Teachers College Record, 12843.

OCR for page 129
References and Bibliography 4 Steinkuehler, C. (2008). Massively multiplayer online games as an educational technol- ogy: An outline for research. Educational Technology, 48(1), 10-21. Steinkuehler, C., and King, B. (2009). Digital literacies for the disengaged: Creating after school contexts to support boys’ game-based literacy skills. On the Hori-­ zon, 17(1), 47-59. Steinkuehler, C.A. (2005). The new third place: Massively multiplayer online gaming in American youth culture. Tidskrift Journal of Research in Teacher Education, 3, 17-32. Steinkuehler, D., and Duncan, S. (2008). Scientific habits of mind in virtual worlds. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 17(6), 530-543. Stevens, R., Beal, C., and Sprang M., (2009). Developing versatile automated assess-­ ments of scientific problem solving. Presentation to the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simulations, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Songer_Gaming_Presentation.pdf [ac- cessed March 23, 2010]. Stevens, R., Satwicz, T., and McCarthy, L. (2008). In-game, in-room, in-world: Recon- necting video game play to the rest of kids’ lives. In K. Salen (Ed.), The ecology of games: Connecting youth, games, and learning (pp. 41-66). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Thai, A.M., Lowenstein, D., Ching, D., and Rejeski, D. (2009). Game changer: Investing in digital play to advance children’s learning and health. New York: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop. Available: http://www. joanganzcooneycenter.org/pdf/Game_Changer_FINAL.pdf [accessed January 2010]. Thomas, D., and Brown, J. (2007). The play of imagination: Extending the literary mind. Games and Culture, 2(2), 149. Timms, M. (2007). Using item response theory (IRT) in an intelligent tutoring system. Proceedings of the 2007 Artificial Intelligence in Education Conference, Marina Del Ray, CA. Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications (vol. 158, pp. 213-221). Amsterdam, Netherlands: IOS Press. Tuzan, H. (2004). Motivating learners in educational computer games. Bloomington: Indiana University. U.S. Department of Education. (2010). Transforming American education: Learning powered by technology. Draft National Education Technology Plan. Washington, DC: Author. Available: http://www.ed.gov/technology/netp-2010 [accessed July 28, 2010]. U.S. President. (2009). President Obama addresses NAS annual meeting. Washington, DC Available: http://www.nationalacademies.org/morenews/20090428.html [Ac- cessed July 28, 2010]. Venkatesh, V., and Bala, H. (2008). Technology acceptance model 3 and a research agenda on interventions. Decision Sciences, 39(2008), 273-315. Vogel, J.J., Vogel, D.S., Cannon-Bowers, J., Bowers, C.A., Muse, K., and Wright, M. (2006). Computer gaming and interactive simulations for learning: A meta-analysis. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 34(3), 229-243. White, B.Y. (1993). ThinkerTools: Causal models, conceptual change, and science education. Cognition and Instruction, 10(1), 1-100.

OCR for page 129
4 Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations White, B., and Frederiksen, J. (1998). Inquiry, modeling, and metacognition: Making science accessible to all students. Cognition and Instruction, 16(1), 3-118. Wilensky, U. (1999). NetLogo. Center for Connected Learning and Computer-Based Modeling, Northwestern University. Available: http://ccl.northwestern.edu/ netlogo [accessed January, 2010]. Wilensky, U. (2003). Statistical mechanics for secondary school: The GasLab Modeling Toolkit. International Journal of Computers for Mathematical Learning, 8(1), 1-41. Wilensky, U., and Reisman, K. (1998). Learning biology through constructing and testing computational theories—An embodied modeling approach. In Y. Bar-Yam (Ed.), Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Complex Systems. Nashua, NH: New England Complex Systems Institute. Williamson, D.M., Bejar, I.I., and Mislevy, R.J. (2006). Automated scoring of complex tasks in computer-­based testing. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Wilson, K.A., Bedwell, W.L., Lazzara, E.H., Salas, E., Burke, C.S., Estock, J.L., Orvis, K.L., and Conkey, C. (2009). Relationships between game attributes and learning outcomes: Review and research proposals. Simulation Gaming, 40, 217-266. Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars. (2003). Foresight and Governance Project explores “serious games.” Available: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/index. cfm?fuseaction=news.item&news_id=20313 [accessed November 2010]. Wulfeck, W.H., Wetzel-Smith, S.K., and Baker, E. (2007). Use of visualization techniques to improve high-stakes problem solving. In E. Baker, H.F. O’Neil, W. Wulfeck, and J. Dickiesen (2007). Assessment of problem solving using simulations. New York: Taylor and Francis. Yaron, D., Karabinos, M., Lange, D., Greeno, J.G., and Leinhardt, G. (2010). The ChemCollective-Virtual Labs for Introductory Chemistry Courses. Science, 328, 584-585. Available: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/reprint/328/5978/584.pdf [accessed September 22, 2010]. Zelman, S.T. (2009). Moving from an analog to digital culture in science education. Presentation to the National Research Council Workshop on Gaming and Simula- tions, October 6-7, Washington, DC. Available: http://www7.nationalacademies. org/bose/Zelman_Gaming_Presentation.pdf [accessed March 23, 2010].