11:05 a.m.

State of the Evidence: How Can Games and Simulations Be Used to Increase Science Learning?

 

Panel:

Yasmin Kafai, University of Pennsylvania

Ton de Jong-Evidence of Learning, University of Twente Jan Plass, New York University

Committee discussion will follow.

12:15 p.m.

Participant Working Lunch

 

Margaret Honey, New York Hall of Science

Guiding Questions for Participants

(2 questions will be assigned to each group):

If the participant packet code is green:

  1. What are the different genres of games and simulations for science education?

  2. How are these genres relevant to support science learning?

If the participant packet code is orange:

  1. What formal science education opportunities with games and simulations might be realized?

  2. What informal science education opportunities with games and simulations might be realized?

If the participant packet code is blue:

  1. How could games and simulations be used to support all students, regardless of individual differences (such as gender, low income), to succeed in science?

  2. What new games and simulations in science education should be built? Why?

1:15 p.m.

Report Out from Participants

 

Committee discussion will follow.

2:00 p.m.

State of the Evidence: What Evidence Is Available from the Cognitive Sciences About Science Learning Through Games and Simulations?

 

Panel:

Daphne Bavelier, University of Rochester

Ellen Wartella, University of California, Riverside

Robert Goldstone, Indiana University

Dexter Fletcher, Institute of Defense Analyses

Committee discussion will follow.

3:00 p.m.

Break



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