Appendix

Workshop Agenda and Participants

WORKSHOP AGENDA

Workshop on the Science of Family Research
Tuesday, July 13, 2010
 
Welcome and Introductions Hiro Yoshikawa, Harvard University
  • Why are we interested in studying families?
  • Why are families important to child health and well-being?
  • Why do we want to focus on the methods of research and data collection?
  • Goals and objectives of the workshop
 
Session 1: Measuring Family Structures, Relationships, and Processes
 
Session 1.1: Measuring Family Structure, Living Arrangements, and Change
Moderator: Rosemary Chalk, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, IOM/NRC
Speakers: Measuring family structure and stability: Emerging trends and measurement challenges
Susan Brown, Bowling Green State University


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Appendix Workshop Agenda and Participants WORKSHOP AGENDA Workshop on the Science of Family Research Tuesday, July 13, 2010 Welcome and Introductions Hiro Yoshikawa, Harvard University · Why are we interested in studying families? · Why are families important to child health and well-being? · hy do we want to focus on the methods of research and data W collection? · Goals and objectives of the workshop Session 1: Measuring Family Structures, Relationships, and Processes Session 1.1: Measuring Family Structure, Living Arrangements, and Change Moderator: Rosemary Chalk, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, IOM/NRC Speakers: Measuring family structure and stability: Emerging trends and measurement challenges Susan Brown, Bowling Green State University 95

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96 TOWARD AN INTEGRATED SCIENCE OF RESEARCH ON FAMILIES Cohabitation and other aspects of household structure and instability Kelly Raley, University of Texas Capturing intergenerational aspects of change in family patterns Kathleen Harris, University of North Carolina Measuring the impact of race, class, and immigration status on family stability Dan Lichter, Cornell University Session 1.2Measuring Interactions Among Stress, Conflict, and Family Processes Moderator: Lisa Pearce, University of North Carolina Speakers: Multimethod research on stress, trauma, and mental health in American Indian families Paul Spicer, University of Oklahoma Assessing the biological stress system: considerations for family research Darlene Kertes, University of Florida Young children and trauma: Research and clinical perspectives on assessment Chandra Ghosh Ippen, University of California, San Francisco Session 2: Conducting Research on Family Influences on the Healthy Development of Children and Youth Session 2.1Studying Relationships Between Family Dynamics and Health Risks Moderator: Anne Duggan, Johns Hopkins University Speakers: Inside family life: Multiple layers of influence on children’s health and well-being Barbara Fiese, University of Illinois Studying substance-abusing fathers: Can evolutionary concepts help? Thomas McMahon, Yale University Conducting research with families with mental health issues from a preventive and resilience-based perspective William Beardslee, Children’s Hospital of Boston

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97 APPENDIX Session 2.2 Studying Families and Child Well-Being Moderator: Margaret Burchinal, University of North Carolina Speakers: Key measurement issues in the study of low-income families and school readiness Heather Bachman, University of Pittsburgh Multi- & mixed-method approaches to studying family contextual factors and child competencies Rashmita Mistry, University of California, Los Angeles Lessons learned from different approaches to studying family processes and child outcomes Rebekah Levine Coley, Boston College Estimating causal effects with observational data: Evidence from Title IX on how sports impacts kids Betsey Stevenson, University of Pennsylvania General Discussion Adjourn Wednesday, July 14, 2010 Session 3: Building the Infrastructure for Family Research Session 3.1Interactive Panel Discussion: Key Issues in Designing and Conducting Mixed Quantitative and Qualitative Behavioral Family Research Moderator: Jane Guyer, Johns Hopkins University Panel members: Nathan Fox, University of Maryland Roger Bakeman, Georgia State University Sandra Hofferth, University of Maryland Topics for discussion: 1. What are quantitative and qualitative approaches and issues related to the measurement of concepts? 2. What are key analysis issues to consider in combining quantitative and qualitative approaches to family research? 3. What are various approaches to and implications of sequencing, phasing, or embedding quantitative and qualitative research? 4. What are the most difficult dilemmas related to combining quantitative and qualitative research methods in family behavioral research and what are potential solutions?

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98 TOWARD AN INTEGRATED SCIENCE OF RESEARCH ON FAMILIES 5. What key issues were raised on the first day of the workshop? Session 3.2Interactive Panel Discussion: Expanding the Talent Pool, Creating Opportunities for Collaboration and Highlighting Research Priorities Moderator: Hiro Yoshikawa, Harvard University Andrew Fuligni, University of California, Los Angeles Sally Powers, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Panel members: Cheryl Boyce, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH Wendy Nilsen, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, NIH Susan Jekielek, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, HHS V. Jeffery Evans, Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, NICHD Topics of discussion: What are barriers to and supports for researchers to: 1. Learn new and integrated sets of methods in family research, across early to senior career stages? 2. Obtain funding for integrated quantitative/qualitative behavioral and biobehavioral family research from federal and foundation sources? Final Observations Hiro Yoshikawa, Harvard University Adjourn

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99 APPENDIX PARTICIPANTS Committee members: Hirokazu Yoshikawa (Chair), Graduate School of Education, Harvard University Jere R. Behrman, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania Margaret R. Burchinal, Design and Statistical Computing Unit, University of North Carolina Anne K. Duggan, General Pediatrics Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Barbara Fiese, Department of Human and Community Development, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Andrew Fuligni, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles Jane I. Guyer, Department of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University Lisa Pearce, Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina Sally I. Powers, Center for Research on Families, University of Massachusetts Speakers: Heather Bachman, Applied Developmental Psychology Program, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh Roger Bakeman, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University William Beardslee, Department of Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital Boston, Gardner/Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School Cheryl Anne Boyce, National Institute on Drug Abuse/National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services Susan Brown, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University Rebekah Levine Coley, Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology, Boston College Jeffrey Evans, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Nathan Fox, Department of Human Development, University of Maryland Chandra Ghosh-Ippen, Child Trauma Research Program, University of California, San Francisco Kathleen Harris, National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Sandra Hofferth, School of Public Health, University of Maryland

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100 TOWARD AN INTEGRATED SCIENCE OF RESEARCH ON FAMILIES Susan Jekielek, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services Darlene Kertes, Department of Psychology and Genetics Institute, University of Florida Daniel Lichter, Departments of Policy Analysis and Management and Sociology, Cornell University Thomas McMahon, Yale University School of Medicine, Connecticut Mental Health Center, and West Haven Mental Health Clinic Rashmita Mistry, Department of Education, University of California, Los Angeles Wendy Nilsen, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health Kelly Raley, Population Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin Paul Spicer, Center for Applied Social Research, University of Oklahoma Betsey Stevenson, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania National Academies staff: Pamella Atayi, Senior Program Assistant Rosemary Chalk, Director, Board on Children, Youth, and Families Reine Homawoo, Senior Program Assistant Wendy Keenan, Program Associate Julienne Marie Palbusa, Research Assistant Consultants: Steve Olson, Editor Holly Rhodes, Rhodes for Early Learning, LLC Registered attendees: Daniela Aldoney, Department of Human Development, University of Maryland Dara Blachman, Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics C. Yolanda Bonta, Hispanic Dental Association Kim Caldeira, Center on Young Adult Health and Development, University of Maryland Nancye Campbell, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services

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101 APPENDIX Seth Chamberlain, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services Elise Corwin, RTI International Beth DeGrace, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center Timothy D’Emilio, Department of Education Barbara Fowler, Wright State University Lynne Haverkos, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Robert Lerman, Urban Institute Sarah Lindstrom Johnson, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Elisabeth Maring, Department of Family Science, University of Maryland Linda Mellgren, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services Diana Morales, National Institute of Mental Health Mary Mueggenborg, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services Patricia Pastor, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Rebecca Rabin, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Sudit Ranade, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University Suzanne Randolph, the MayaTech Corporation Kevin Roy, Associate Professor of Family Science, University of Maryland Srishti Seth, Catholic University of America Karen Sirocco, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health Cristan Smith, University of Maryland Tyler Smith, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Louisa Tarullo, Mathematica Policy Research Alicia Thomas, Grantmakers In Health Mary Bruce Webb, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services T’Pring Westbrook, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services

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