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Speaker Biographies

Steven Kenyon Ault, M.Sc., REHS, is a public health biologist and Regional Advisor for Parasitic and Neglected Diseases at the Pan-American Health Organization, Regional Office of the World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) in Washington, DC. His portfolio includes the coordination of neglected tropical diseases control and elimination focusing on lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, and soil-transmitted helminthiasis, and collaboration on leishmaniasis, leprosy, trachoma, fascioliasis, and integrated vector control. He has served with PAHO/WHO in Guatemala and Brazil from 1997 to 2005, and prior to then as Technical Director for Public Health in the U.S. Agency for International Development Environmental Health Project (1994–1997), Deputy Director of the California EPA Comparative Risk Project (1991–1993), Chief of Research Services at the California Integrated Waste Management Board, and senior lecturer in environmental studies at the CSU Sacramento.


Mauricio L. Barreto, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is a Full Professor of Epidemiology at the Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil. His research has covered topics such as schistosomiais, diarrhea, dengue, tuberculosis, leprosy, and asthma. His research program has a multidisciplinary perspective and is focused on environmental and social determinants and the impact of population-based interventions. He has coordinated large epidemiological and evaluative studies in Brazil and Ecuador and participates in several international networks. He has published more than 240 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has participated in several health policy and scientific advisory boards at national and international agencies. He is a fellow of the Brazilian



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F Speaker Biographies Steven Kenyon Ault, M.Sc., REHS, is a public health biologist and Regional Advisor for Parasitic and Neglected Diseases at the Pan-American Health Or- ganization, Regional Office of the World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) in Washington, DC. His portfolio includes the coordination of neglected tropical diseases control and elimination focusing on lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, and soil-transmitted helminthiasis, and collaboration on leish - maniasis, leprosy, trachoma, fascioliasis, and integrated vector control. He has served with PAHO/WHO in Guatemala and Brazil from 1997 to 2005, and prior to then as Technical Director for Public Health in the U.S. Agency for Interna - tional Development Environmental Health Project (1994–1997), Deputy Director of the California EPA Comparative Risk Project (1991–1993), Chief of Research Services at the California Integrated Waste Management Board, and senior lec - turer in environmental studies at the CSU Sacramento. Mauricio L. Barreto, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is a Full Professor of Epidemiol- ogy at the Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil. His research has covered topics such as schistosomiais, diarrhea, dengue, tuberculosis, leprosy, and asthma. His research program has a multidisciplinary perspective and is focused on environmental and social determinants and the impact of population-based interventions. He has coordinated large epidemio - logical and evaluative studies in Brazil and Ecuador and participates in several international networks. He has published more than 240 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has participated in several health policy and scientific advi- sory boards at national and international agencies. He is a fellow of the Brazilian 567

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568 NEGLECTED TROPICAL AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES Academy of Sciences and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. Chris Beyrer, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor of Epidemiology, International Health and Health, Behavior and Society at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He directs the Johns Hopkins Fogarty AIDS International Train- ing and Research Program, which provides research training in HIV/AIDS for providers from Africa, Asia, and the Commonwealth of Independent States. He is the Founder and Director of the Center for Public Health and Human Rights at Hopkins, which is engaged in research, teaching, and policy work on public health and human rights issues. Dr. Beyrer received his M.D. from the State Uni- versity of New York, Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York, and did his public health and infectious diseases training at Johns Hopkins. In 2008 Dr. Beyrer was elected to the Governing Council of the International AIDS Society as a representative for North America. He currently has research and/or training activities under way in Thailand, Burma, China, India, Vietnam, Russia, Kazakh - stan, Uganda, Ethiopia, Malawi, and South Africa. Shing Chang, Ph.D., is the Research and Development Director at DNDi (Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative, a Geneva-based nonprofit organization devoted to the research and development of drugs for neglected tropical diseases). In this position he has the overall responsibility of building DNDi’s project portfolio and advancing the discovery and development of new treatments for neglected diseases. Prior to joining DNDi in October 2007, Dr. Chang was Senior Vice President of Drug Discovery and Chief Scientific Officer at ICOS Corporation in Seattle. From 1991 to 2006, Dr. Chang held various management positions at Abbott Laboratories in diagnostics and pharmaceutical research, including the post of Divisional Vice President, Infectious Disease Research. From 1978 to 1991, Dr. Chang held various positions at Cetus Corporation, including Vice President of Preclinical and Development. He earned his Ph.D. degree in molecular biology and biochemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and received his postdoctoral training at the University of Wisconsin and Stanford University. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Clinical Center Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health, is currently serving as a Special Advisor on Health Policy to the Director of the White House Office of Manage - ment and Budget (OMB). He is also a breast oncologist and author. For the past decade, Dr. Emanuel has worked on global health issues, espe- cially related to malaria and HIV/AIDS. He has trained researchers in developing countries on the ethics of clinical research and conducted numerous studies of ethical issues related to research in developing countries. In his role at OMB,

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569 APPENDIX F Dr. Emanuel has been involved in developing President Obama’s Global Health Initiative. He has received numerous awards including election to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences and the Association of American Physicians. After completing Amherst College, Dr. Emanuel received an M.Sc. in biochemistry from Oxford University and then attended Harvard University, where he earned his M.D. from the medical school and a Ph.D. in political philosophy. Christopher Eppig has been a Ph.D. student in the Human Evolutionary and Behavioral Sciences Program and the Biology Department at the University of New Mexico since 2005. He has conducted research on humans in diverse areas, including chemical communication, social behavior, endocrinology, male sexual behavior, and intelligence. His research has been widely covered by international media, including The Economist, The Guaridan, Newsweek, and ScienceNow. Mark B. Feinberg, M.D., Ph.D.,1 is vice president for medical affairs and policy in global vaccine and infectious diseases at Merck & Co., Inc., and is responsible for global efforts to implement vaccines to achieve the greatest health benefits, including efforts to expand access to new vaccines in the developing world. Dr. Feinberg received a bachelor’s degree magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania in 1978 and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University School of Medicine in 1987. His Ph.D. research at Stanford was supervised by Dr. Irving Weissman and included time spent studying the molecular biology of the human retroviruses—human T-cell lymphotrophic virus, type I (HTLV-I) and HIV—as a visiting scientist in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Gallo at the National Cancer Institute. From 1985 to 1986, Dr. Feinberg served as a project officer for the IOM Committee on a National Strategy for AIDS. After receiving his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees, Dr. Feinberg pursued postgraduate residency training in inter- nal medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital of Harvard Medical School and postdoctoral fellowship research in the laboratory of Dr. David Baltimore at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. From 1991 to 1995, Dr. Feinberg was an assistant professor of medicine and microbiology and immunol - ogy at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he also served as an attending physician in the AIDS-oncology division and as director of the virology research laboratory at San Francisco General Hospital. From 1995 to 1997, Dr. Feinberg was a medical officer in the Office of AIDS Research in the Office of the Director of the NIH, the chair of the NIH Coordinating Committee on AIDS Etiology and Pathogenesis Research, and an attending physician at the NIH Clinical Center. During this period, he also served as Executive Secretary of the NIH Panel to Define Principles of Therapy of HIV Infection. Prior to joining 1 Member of the Forum on Microbial Threats.

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570 NEGLECTED TROPICAL AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES Merck in 2004, Dr. Feinberg served as Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and immunology at the Emory University School of Medicine, as an investigator at the Emory Vaccine Center, and as an attending physician at Grady Memorial Hospital. At UCSF and Emory, Dr. Feinberg and colleagues were engaged in the preclinical development and evaluation of novel vaccines for HIV and other infectious diseases and in basic research studies focused on revealing fundamen- tal aspects of the pathogenesis of AIDS. Dr. Feinberg also founded and served as the medical director of the Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center—a clini- cal research facility devoted to the clinical evaluation of novel vaccines and to translational research studies of human immune system biology. In addition to his other professional roles, Dr. Feinberg has also served as a consultant to, and a member of, several IOM and NAS committees. Dr. Feinberg currently serves as a member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Dr. Feinberg has earned board certification in internal medicine; he is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the Association of American Physicians, and the recipient of an Elizabeth Glaser Scientist Award from the Pediatric AIDS Foundation and an Innovation in Clinical Research Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Alan Fenwick, O.B.E., is Professor of Tropical Parasitology and Director of the Schistosomiasis Control Initiative at Imperial College London. Dr. Fenwick has lived and worked in Tanzania, Sudan, and Egypt, in each country researching and controlling schistosomiasis and intestinal worms. In 2002 he returned from Africa to be based in the United Kingdom after being awarded funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to prove the principle that six African countries were capable of mounting control campaigns against helminths if the resources were available to them. He is a campaigner for increased funding for neglected tropical disease (NTD) control. Mr. Fenwick’s work has been recognized by the Queen (OBE and Anniversary medal for research) and by his peers (Donald McKay medal from the RSTMH). Christy Hanson, Ph.D., is the Chief of the U.S. Agency for International De- velopment’s (USAID’s) infectious disease division. She received her master’s in public health from the University of Minnesota and her Ph.D. in international health systems, with a concentration in health economics, from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Hanson has more than 15 years’ experience in international tuber- culosis (TB) control with support to countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America through her previous positions with WHO, the World Bank, and PATH. She has published and presented widely on various aspects of TB control. She is currently chair of the Stop TB Partnership’s Retooling Task Force and is a member of the Global Fund’s technical review panel. Dr. Hanson has also published on the economic burden of NTDs and is USAID’s technical lead for its NTD Initiative.

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571 APPENDIX F She manages the Other Public Health Threat element for USAID, which includes containment of antimicrobial resistance, surveillance, and outbreak response for infectious diseases. Donald R. Hopkins, M.D., M.P.H., is Vice President (Health) of the Carter Cen- ter in Atlanta, Georgia. He oversees the Center’s international health programs in 10 African and 6 Latin American countries as well as the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program, and he chairs the International Task Force for Disease Eradica - tion. He has led the Guinea Worm Eradication Program at the Carter Center since 1986 and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) since 1980. Dr. Hopkins is presently a member of the WHO Strategic and Technical Advisory Group on Neglected Tropical Diseases. He has served as consultant on several WHO committees and as a member of the U.S. delegation to seven World Health Assemblies. He participated in the Smallpox Eradication Program (Sierra Leone, India, Ethiopia) and is a former Deputy Director of CDC. He is the author of The Greatest Killer: Smallpox in History. Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D., is the Distinguished Research Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, & Tropical Medicine at George Washington University, and President of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, an affiliated nonprofit research, development, and advocacy organization. Dr. Hotez received a bachelor’s degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry magna cum laude (phi beta kappa) from Yale University, a Ph.D. from Rockefeller University, and a doctorate in medicine from Weill Cornell Medical College. He obtained pedi - atric residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and postdoctoral training at Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Hotez’s research focuses on vaccine development for parasitic diseases, with an emphasis on recombinant vaccines for hookworm and schistosomiasis. He is Director and Principal Investi- gator of the Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative, a product development partner- ship supported by the Gates Foundation and other sources. Dr. Hotez also has a strong policy interest to promote the control of NTDs and in 2006 at the Clinton Global Initiative Dr. Hotez helped to cofound the Global Network for NTDs for providing access to essential NTD drugs. In 2007, Dr. Hotez became the found - ing Editor-in-Chief of PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, and he is currently the President-Elect of the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. Dr. Hotez has published more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles as well as several books, including Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases (ASM Press). Julie Jacobson, M.D., is a Senior Program Officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Dr. Jacobson, currently supports grants working toward the control of NTDs and works with the development and implementation of new vaccines in the infectious disease group of Global Health. As former Scientific Director of Immunization Solutions and Director of PATH’s Japanese encephalitis (JE)

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572 NEGLECTED TROPICAL AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES project, she managed a US$35 million grant to accelerate the control of JE in endemic countries by improving data on the distribution of JE, accelerating the development of an improved vaccine and diagnostic tests for JE, and helping countries integrate JE vaccine into immunization programs. In her role as Sci - entific Director she defined the direction and growth of immunization solutions work by increasing the availability of vaccines to the world’s most vulnerable populations. This included work on clinical trials for specific vaccines to directly working with ministries of health and partners in decision making on vaccine introduction and planning. Previously, she was responsible for prioritizing and designing field activities for PATH’s Children’s Vaccine Project in the areas in - cluding yellow fever and rotavirus. Prior to joining PATH, Dr. Jacobson worked at CDC as an Epidemic Intelligence Officer. In this capacity, she worked in disaster epidemiology and conducted needs assessments for disaster victims, evaluated national surveillance systems, and evaluated the health impact of earthquakes on displaced persons. Dr. Jacobson is a physician with training in clinical tropical medicine and applied epidemiology. Jean Jannin, M.D., received his medical degree in Paris, France. He also re- ceived diplomas in leprology, parasitology, epidemiology, and biostatistics. He also obtained an M.Sc. in public health and graduated from the French National School of Public Health and from the Political Science Institute of Paris. He is General Public Health Inspector of the French Ministry of Health. After 10 years spent in Africa (Cameroon, Gabon, Chad, Congo) in charge of various programs, he came back to the French Ministry of Health before joining WHO in Geneva in 1995. After having been in charge of the African trypanosomiasis program, in 2005 he became Coordinator of Innovative and Intensified Disease Management in the WHO Neglected Tropical Diseases Department of WHO in Geneva. Charles H. King, M.D., is an infectious disease specialist, epidemiologist, and senior member of the Center for Global Health and Diseases at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and the Schistosomiasis Consortium for Op - erational Research and Evaluation at the University of Georgia. After completing his medical degree at SUNY-Downstate, he began research on parasitic infections in 1979 during his residency at University Hospitals of Cleveland. Since 1984, he has been active on parasite control and immunology research in Kenya and has recently focused on modeling and implementation of advanced programs for schistosomiasis control and elimination. His current research focuses on identi - fication of human and environmental ecological drivers of vector-borne parasite transmission, and the design of more effective, integrated programs for parasite control.

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573 APPENDIX F Lonnie J. King, D.V.M.2, is the 10th dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University (OSU). In addition to leading this college, Dr. King is also a professor of preventive medicine and holds the Ruth Stanton Endowed Chair in Veterinary Medicine. Before becoming dean at OSU, he was the direc- tor of CDC’s new National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Dis- eases (NCZVED). In this new position, Dr. King leads the Center’s activities for surveillance, diagnostics, disease investigations, epidemiology, research, public education, policy development, and diseases prevention and control programs. NCZVED also focuses on water-borne, food-borne, vectorborne, and zoonotic diseases of public health concern, which also include most of CDC’s select and bioterrorism agents, neglected tropical diseases, and emerging zoonoses. Before serving as director, he was the first chief of the agency’s Office of Strategy and Innovation. Dr. King served as dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, from 1996 to 2006. As at OSU, he served as the CEO for aca- demic programs, research, the teaching hospital, the diagnostic center for popula- tion and animal health, basic and clinical science departments, and the outreach and continuing education programs. As dean and professor of large-animal clini - cal sciences, Dr. King was instrumental in obtaining funds for the construction of a $60 million Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health; he initi - ated the Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases in the college, he served as the campus leader in food safety, and he had oversight for the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center. In 1992, Dr. King was appointed administrator for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), in Washington, DC. In this role, he provided executive leadership and direction for ensuring the health and care of animals and plants, to improve agricultural productivity and competitiveness, and to contribute to the national economy and public health. Dr. King also served as the country’s chief veterinary officer for five years, worked extensively in global trade agreements within the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization, and worked extensively with the World Animal Health Association. During this time he was the Deputy Administrator for Veterinary Services of APHIS, USDA, where he led national efforts in disease eradication, imports and exports, and diagnostics in both Ames, Iowa, and Plum Island. He spent five years in Hyattsville, Maryland, in staff assignments in Emergency Programs, as well as Animal Health Informa - tion. While in Hyattsville, Dr. King directed the development of the agency’s National Animal Health Monitoring System. He left APHIS briefly to serve as the director of the Governmental Relations Division of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) in Washington, DC, and served as the lobbyist for the AVMA on Capitol Hill. 2 Member and Vice-Chair of the Forum on Microbial Threats.

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574 NEGLECTED TROPICAL AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES Dr. King was in private veterinary practice for seven years in Dayton, Ohio, and Atlanta, Georgia. As a native of Wooster, Ohio, Dr. King received his B.S. and D.V.M. from OSU in 1966 and 1970, respectively. He earned his M.S. in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota and received his M.P.A. from American University in Washington, DC, in 1991. Dr. King is a board-certified member of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and has com- pleted the Senior Executive Fellowship program at Harvard University. He served as president of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Col leges from 1999 to 2000 and was the Vice-Chair for the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues from 2000 to 2004. He has served on four NAS committees, including chairing the National Academies’ Committee on Assess ing the Na- tion’s Framework for Addressing Animal Diseases. He is also Chair of the IOM Committee on Lyme Disease and Other Tick-Borne Diseases and for State of the Science, and he is also chairing the AVMA’s Commission for AVMA Vision 2020. Dr. King is currently a member of the IOM Committee on Microbial Threats to Health, is a past member of the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Board of Scientific Advisors, and is past President of the American Veterinary Epidemiol - ogy Society. He served as the Chair for the national One Medicine Task Force for the AVMA, which helped start the country’s One Health Initiative. Dr. King was elected as a member of the IOM of the National Academies in 2004. Patrick J. Lammie, Ph.D., M.S., was the Team Leader of the Diseases Elimina- tion and Control Group in the Division of Parasitic Diseases at CDC until he was seconded to the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases in 2009. Dr. Lammie received his Ph.D. from Tulane University in 1983 following doctoral research on lymphatic filariasis. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania, he was a faculty member at Louisiana State University Medi - cal Center in New Orleans before moving to CDC. At CDC, Dr. Lammie was involved in both laboratory and field work focused on understanding the patho - genesis of lymphatic filariasis. From this work, he became involved with public health efforts aimed at eliminating filariasis at the community level through mass drug administration in Haiti, Guyana, American Samoa, and other countries. Beyond his work at CDC, he serves as an Adjunct Professor at both Emory Uni- versity and the University of Georgia and as a member of the Executive Group of the Global Alliance for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis and of WHO’s Working Group on the Monitoring and Evaluation of NTD Programs. At the Global Network, Dr. Lammie is the Technical Director, and his work supports the development and implementation of NTD control and elimination programs. Harold Margolis, M.D., is the Director of the Dengue Branch of CDC in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He previously served as Director of the Pediatric Dengue Vac - cine Initiative, a program of the International Vaccine Institute. Dr. Margolis has had a long prior association with CDC, beginning as an Officer of the Epidemic

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575 APPENDIX F Investigation Service, stationed at the Arctic Investigations Program in Anchor- age, and ending as Director of the Division of Viral Hepatitis, where he was instrumental in the worldwide introduction of the hepatitis B vaccine. He is a board-certified pediatrician, a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. His research and public health interests have focused on evaluation and introduction of new vaccines, molecular epidemiology of hepatitis viruses, and development of evidence-based public health policy. Dr. Margolis is the author or coauthor of 180 peer-reviewed publications, including 35 book chapters or proceedings. Marian C. McDonald, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., M.A., is Associate Director of Health Disparities for the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Dis- eases at CDC. She has worked in women’s health and minority health as an edu- cator, scientist, writer, and advocate for three decades. She received her Dr.P.H. and M.P.H. from the University of California at Berkeley School of Public Health, and holds a master’s in women’s studies from Goddard College. Since going to CDC in 2002, she has provided leadership to numerous efforts to advance the health of women, minorities, and vulnerable populations. She envisioned and chaired the first International Conference on Women and Infectious Disease (ICWID) in Atlanta in 2004, and chaired the second ICWID in 2006. She serves on CDC’s Health Equity Work Group and works on agency efforts to address social determinants of health. In 2009 she spearheaded CDC’s work on Neglected Infections of Poverty and continues to contribute to the leadership of these ef - forts. She has worked extensively in Latino health since the 1990s, founding and directing a number of Latino health projects. Dr. McDonald was formerly a professor at Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, where she pioneered coursework on gender, race, and ethnicity in health. She has published on women’s health, vulnerable populations in preparedness, using the arts in health promotion, and neglected infections of poverty. Her awards include CDC’s highest Health Equity Award and the Award for Distinguished Service to the Greater New Orleans Latino Community. She is a member of Delta Omega, the National Public Health Honor Society. Mary Moran, M.B.B.S., Grad Dip FAT, has more than 20 years’ experience in health policy and practice, including 10 years specializing in neglected disease policy. She has conducted projects for a wide range of public and multilateral health organizations with a focus on policy solutions for emerging issues related to neglected disease research and development. In 2004, Ms. Moran founded the research group that became Policy Cures at the London School of Economics & Political Science, later transferring it to the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney. Prior to forming the group, she worked for more than a decade in emergency medicine; was a diplomat and policy analyst with the Australian Department

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576 NEGLECTED TROPICAL AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES of Foreign Affairs & Trade; was Director of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Access to Essential Medicines Campaign in Australia; and was a Europe-based policy advocate with MSF on issues relating to access to medicines for neglected patients. Ms. Moran is an Honorary Senior Lecturer at the London School of Hy - giene and Tropical Medicine, and an expert adviser to WHO, the European Com- mission, the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership, the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Wellcome Trust. Eric A. Ottesen, M.D., is Director of the Lymphatic Filariasis Support Center at the Task Force for Global Health, Technical Director of the NTD Control Pro - gram of RTI International, and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. He received his A.B. from Princeton University in 1965 and his M.D. from Harvard University in 1970, and he is board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. Formerly head of the Clinical Parasitology Section of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health (NIH) (1975–1994), and Project Leader of the Filariasis Elimination Programme at WHO (1995–2001), he currently manages a Gates Foundation grant for operational research focused on “Resolving the Critical Challenges Now Facing the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis” and provides technical support to USAID-funded efforts in 14 countries to control or eliminate NTDs through programmatically integrated approaches. Dr. Ottesen’s research interests have centered principally on host respon - siveness to parasitic helminth infections (primarily filariasis, onchocerciasis, and schistosomiasis) and on the relationship between allergic and parasitic dis - eases. Professional activities now target the elimination of lymphatic filariasis worldwide (especially program monitoring and evaluation), integrated control of NTDs, and the clinical and immunological aspects of filarial disease. Lorenzo Savioli, M.D., M.Sc., DTM&H, is the Director of the Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases of WHO. He graduated in Rome with de- grees in medicine in 1977, in tropical medicine in 1979, and in infectious diseases in 1985. He has an M.Sc. in parasitology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the DTM&H from the Royal College of Physicians of London. In the 1970s he developed a fascination for classical clinical semeiol - ogy and tropical medicine and in 1979 decided to go to Zanzibar to work in the small district Hospital of Chake Chake on the island of Pemba. In 1986 he started the Pemba Island Schistosomiasis Control Programme, which a few years later was extended to include the control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis. In 1991, he joined WHO in Geneva as the medical officer in charge of the Programme on Intestinal Parasitic Infections and in 1996 was appointed Chief of the Schistoso-

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577 APPENDIX F miasis and Intestinal Parasites unit. As Director of the NTD department, Dr. Savi- oli has overseen a portfolio of a large number of tropical diseases, ranging from schistosomiasis and other helminthiasis including the Guinea Worm eradication programme to the control of human African trypanosomiasis, Buruli ulcer, and leishmaniasis. Under his leadership, WHO has exponentially expanded support for prevention and treatment programs and developed a global strategy on preven- tive anthelminthic chemotherapy that is the base of large-scale interventions that regularly target millions of children and adults in endemic areas. He is Senior Associate in the Department of International Health of the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, and a Fellow of the Islamic Academy of Sciences, Amman, Jordan. In 1986 he received the First Prize of the Rorer Foundation for Medical Science for Italian Medicine for Developing Countries. Jerry M. Spiegel, M.A., M.Sc., Ph.D., is Director, Global Health, Liu Institute for Global Issues, and associate professor, School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada. He was also founding President of the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Re - search and is a member of the UBC Neglected Global Disease Initiative Working Group. He directs research projects on applying an eco-bio-social approach to dengue in Ecuador and Cuba as part of a broader research program on globaliza - tion, social organization, and health that also includes initiatives in strengthening of health worker capacity to respond to extreme drug-resistant TB and HIV/AIDS in South Africa. Rick L. Tarleton, Ph.D., received his Ph.D. from Wake Forest University in 1983, continuing research on Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease that he began as an undergraduate. He joined the faculty of the University of Georgia in 1984 as an Assistant Professor in the then Department of Zoology and is currently a Distinguished Research Professor and UGA-AA Distinguished Research Chair in Cellular Biology. He is also founding Director, Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases, University of Georgia (1998–2001); Burroughs Wellcome Fund Scholar in Molecular Parasitology (1995–2000); member, Wake Forest University Board of Visitors (1996–2004); member, NIH Tropical Medicine and Parasitology Study Section (1996–2000); Director, NIH Tropical Disease Research Unit on Vaccine Development for Chagas Disease (1998–2003); Founder and President, the Chagas Disease Foundation (2008 to present); and member, WHO/TDR Disease Reference Group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (2009 to present). Dr. Tar- leton has published more than 100 peer-reviewed studies, nearly all in the area of Chagas disease. His specific research focus is the mechanisms of immunity and

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578 NEGLECTED TROPICAL AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES disease in T. cruzi infection (causative agent of human Chagas disease) and the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. Mary E. Wilson, M.D.,3 is Associate Professor of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her academic interests include the ecol - ogy of infections and emergence of microbial threats, travel medicine, tuberculo - sis, and vaccines. Her undergraduate degree in French, English, and philosophy was awarded by Indiana University; she received her M.D. from the University of Wisconsin and completed an internal medicine residency and infectious disease fellowship at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston (now Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center). She was Chief of Infectious Diseases at Mount Auburn Hos - pital, a Harvard-affiliated community teaching hospital in Cambridge, Massa- chusetts, for more than 20 years. She is a fellow in the IDSA and the American College of Physicians. She has served on ACIP of CDC, the Academic Advisory Committee for the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico, and on four committees for the IOM of the National Academies, including the Committee on Emerging Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century, whose report ( Mi- crobial Threats to Health: Emergence, Detection, and Response) was released in March 2003. She has worked in Haiti at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital and leads the Harvard-Brazil Collaborative Course on Infectious Diseases, which is taught in Brazil. In 1996 she was a resident scholar at the Bellagio Study Center, Italy, and in 2002 she was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, California. She was a member of the Pew National Com- mission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, whose report Putting Meat on the Table: Industrial Farm Animal Production in America was released in the spring of 2008. A former GeoSentinel Site Director (Cambridge), she now serves as a Special Advisor to the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network, a global network. She has lectured and published widely, serves on several editorial boards, and is an Associate Editor for Journal Watch Infectious Diseases. She is the author of A World Guide to Infections: Diseases, Distribution, Diagnosis (Oxford University Press, New York, 1991); Senior Editor, with Richard Levins and Andrew Spiel- man, of Disease in Evolution: Global Changes and Emergence of Infectious Diseases (New York Academy of Sciences, 1994); and Editor of the volume New and Emerging Infectious Diseases (Medical Clinics of North America) published in 2008. She joined the Board of Trustees for ICDDR,B (International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh) in 2009 and is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for CDC, the FXB-USA Board, and the APUA Board of Directors. 3 Member of the Forum on Microbial Threats.