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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Levenson, Milton (Chair) Milton Levenson is an independent consultant. He is a chemical engi- neer with more than 60 years of experience in nuclear energy and related fields. His technical experience includes work related to nuclear safety, fuel cycle, water reactors, advanced reactors, and remote control technologies. His professional experience includes research and operations positions at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Argonne National Labora- tory, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Bechtel. He was elected to National Academy of Engineering in 1976. Mr. Levenson is a fellow and past president of the American Nuclear Society, a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’ Robert E. Wilson Award in Nuclear Chemical Engi- neering. He is the author of more than 150 publications and presentations and holds three U.S. patents. Mr. Levenson has served as chairman or committee member for several National Academies studies. He received his B.Ch.E degree from the University of Minnesota. Ewing, Rodney C. (Vice-Chair) Rodney C. Ewing is the Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Profes- sor in Geological Sciences with joint appointments in the Departments of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. Prior to arriving at Michigan, he 243

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244 APPENDIX A was Regents’ Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico. During 2010-2011 he was a Visiting Pro- fessor at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. His professional interests are in mineralogy and materials sci- ence, and his research has focused on radiation effects in complex ceramic materials and the long-term durability of radioactive waste forms. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Geological Society of America, and the Mineralogical Society of America, and a member of Sigma Xi. He is a past president of the International Union of Materials Research Societies and the Mineralogical Society of America. Dr. Ewing is currently a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the Materials Research Society, the American Ceramic Society, and the Geochemical Society. In 2006, he was awarded the Lomonosov Great Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and in 2007, he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Université Pierre et Marie Curie. He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Stanford University. Members Ahn, Joonhong Dr. Joonhong Ahn is a professor of radioactive waste management and nuclear fuel cycle at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include the performance assessment of deep geological disposal systems for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), especially analyses of mass transport through engineered barriers and the natural geological barrier. He is also interested in the future of nuclear energy in the Asia/Pacific region. He has published papers on (1) the transport of radionuclides through a fractured geological medium; (2) the mass transport of radionuclides in a shallow-land repository for low-level wastes; (3) the sensitivity analysis of radionuclide transport through a fractured medium; (4) radionuclide diffusion in a fracture network by applying percolation theory and frac- tal geometry; (5) the mass transfer and transport analyses for engineered barriers; (6) bentonite expansion into fractures in a host rock surrounding the engineered barriers and mass transport in the same region; (7) analysis of the autocatalytic criticality of buried fissile materials; (8) mass-flow analysis for the nuclear fuel cycle; and (9) waste-form modeling by applying linear-programming approach. Professor Ahn currently serves as a member of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Academies, and the chair of the Book-Publishing Committee of the American Nuclear Society. In the past he has served as a member of the planning committee for the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (1992-1995). He was at the review committee (1992) for the first official report to the Atomic Energy Commis-

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245 APPENDIX A sion on Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. He served as the editor for Radioactive Waste Research (1994-1996), a journal of the Divi- sion of Radioactive Waste Management, Atomic Energy Society of Japan. He received his Ph.D. degree in nuclear engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and Doctor of Engineering degree from the University of Tokyo. Apted, Michael J. Dr. Michael J. Apted is a scientific consultant, currently associated with Monitor Scientific, LLC, with more than 25 years of experience in nuclear- waste disposal research and development, primarily in the design and testing of engineered barrier systems (EBS), hydrogeochemical modeling, and safety assessment. For the Electric Power Research Institute, he is the research and development manager for post-closure risk assessment studies regarding disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. He is a member of the International Technical Advisory Committee (ITAC) to the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) and serves as a coordinator for NUMO’s International Tectonics Committee. Dr. Apted is Chairman of the EBS and Technology Support Group for STUK, the safety authority in Finland. He also has consulted for nuclear waste repository implementation and regulatory agencies in Sweden, Switzerland, South Africa, Canada, Taiwan, and South Korea. Dr. Apted is a past chairman for the Materials Research Society’s Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management. He has organized, conducted, and authored reports for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). He has served on various National Academies committees related to nuclear waste disposal. Dr. Apted has presented and/or published over 150 papers in the above technical subjects. He has a B.S. degree in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. degree in geochemistry from the University of California, at Los Angeles. Burns, Peter C. Dr. Peter C. Burns is The Henry Massman Professor of Civil Engineering, Director of the Energy Frontier Research Center, concurrent Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and chair of the Department of Civil Engineer- ing and Geological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on the solid state and environmental chemistry of heavy metals, especially actinides including uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. Cur- rent emphasis includes studies of the structures and stabilities of uranium, thorium, and plutonium clusters containing as many as 60 metal atoms.

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246 APPENDIX A Much of this research is applied to nuclear waste disposal and under- standing the mobility of actinides and heavy metals in the environment. In 2001, Burns was awarded the Mineralogical Society of America Award and became a life fellow. He was awarded the Donath Medal of the Geologi- cal Society of America in 1999, as well as several other society awards. He has published more than 200 archival journal papers dealing with various aspects of actinides. He is currently the president of the Mineralogical Asso- ciation of Canada and a member of the council of the Mineralogical Society of America. He received his Ph.D. degree in geology from the University of Manitoba. Colakyan, Manuk Dr. Manuk Colakyan is currently a senior technical leader at the Dow Chemical Company. Dr. Colakyan received a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Istanbul Technical University. After completing his doc- torate at Oregon State University, he joined Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) where he has held positions both in R&D and Engineering Depart- ments and then the Dow Chemical Company when Dow acquired UCC in 2001. He has led the Solids Processing and Reaction Engineering Groups and worked with many of Union Carbide’s and Dow’s processes. He is an expert in fluidization technology and continues to apply his technical knowledge to improve production and safety of commercial processes. His work includes measurement and modeling of reaction kinetics for heteroge- neously and homogeneously catalyzed reactions; identification and evalua- tion of catalysts for gas-liquid-solid, gas-solid reactions; commercial scale implementation of catalyst/reactors; and solids processing and handling. Dr. Colakyan is active in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, having served as a group chair and, programming chair for the Particle Technology Forum. Fabryka-Martin, June Dr. June Fabryka-Martin is a staff scientist in the Environmental and Earth Sciences Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, NM. Dr. Fabryka-Martin’s work experiences span a broad range of topics related to radiological issues and disposal of wastes in the deep subsurface. Her work in these areas has addressed such topics as modeling radiation fluxes and nuclear reaction rates in geologic media for studies per- taining to the geochemistry of fission products and plutonium, interpreting geochemical and isotopic compositions as indicators of water-rock reac- tions and groundwater flow paths, characterizing legacy transuranic waste streams produced by past Los Alamos National Laboratory activities, and

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247 APPENDIX A evaluating the sustainability of deep subsurface injection of brine concen- trates from desalinization facilities. Her studies of spatial distributions of chloride and chlorine-36 in the subsurface at Yucca Mountain played sig- nificant roles in the development and testing of hydrologic process models for assessing the viability of this site as a geologic repository for radioactive waste, in particular by highlighting the potential role of fast transport paths in this geologic setting. Dr. Fabryka-Martin has served as a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board’s (SAB) Radiation Advisory Committee and has contributed to over 10 SAB reports and advisories over the past decade. She holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in hydrology and water resources from the University of Arizona. Jantzen, Carol M. Dr. Carol M. Jantzen is a senior advisory scientist with the Savannah River National Laboratory. For the past 33 years she has performed research and development in glass, ceramic, cement, geopolymer, and mineral waste forms. She has worked on waste form interactions with various geologic media related to problems of nuclear and hazardous waste management and waste disposal. She has developed waste form durability tests and stan- dards for the stabilization of high level, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Her research spans vitreous, crystalline ceramic, mineral, and cementitious waste form development, processing, and char- acterization in both the U.S. and Europe. She helped develop techniques for stabilizing nuclear and hazardous wastes, including mining wastes. In 2008 she won the Wendell Weart Lifetime Achievement Award in nuclear waste management for more than three decades of outstanding contributions to nuclear waste management. She is a fellow, past president, and distin- guished life member of the American Ceramic Society. Dr. Jantzen was also a member of the National Research Council’s Commission on Physical Sci- ences, Mathematics, and Astronomy from 1997 to 2000. Jantzen received a Ph.D. degree in materials science and engineering from the State University of New York at Stony Brook with a specialization in glass chemistry, glass decomposition mechanisms, and glass durability. Her postdoctoral research was in cement stabilization of U.S. and U.K. wastes in the Department of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. Johnson, David W. Dr. David W. Johnson is the retired director of metallurgy and ceramics research at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, and adjunct profes- sor of materials science at Stevens Institute of Technology. His research activities included fabrication and processing of glass and ceramics with

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248 APPENDIX A emphasis on materials for electronic and photonic applications. He is a Fellow, Distinguished Life Member, and Past President of the American Ceramic Society (ACerS), and is a member of several other professional societies. Dr. Johnson won the Taylor Lecture Award and the Distinguished Alumni Award from Pennsylvania State University; the Ross Coffin Purdy Award for the best paper in ceramic literature, the Fulrath Award, the John Jeppson Award, and the Orton Lecture Award from the American Ceramic Society; and received the Industrial Ceramics 2000 prize from the Acad- emy of Ceramics. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993 for his discovery of new compositions and processing techniques and their transfer to manufacturing and he is a member of the Academy of Ceramics. He holds 46 U.S. patents and has published numerous papers on materials sciences. He graduated from Pennsylvania State University, earning a B.S. degree in ceramic technology in 1964 and a Ph.D. degree in ceramic science in 1968. Nash, Kenneth L. Dr. Kenneth L. Nash has been a professor of chemistry at Washington State University for the past 6 years. During the past 30+ years, his research has focused principally on chemical separations science, environmental chemistry and the basic coordination chemistry of actinides and important fission products (mainly lanthanides). He has published extensively on the fundamental solution chemistry of actinides, solvent extraction and ion exchange, environmental chemistry/radioactive waste management, and applications of basic science to solving real-world problems associated with the use of radioactive materials. Previous to his current position, Dr. Nash conducted and directed basic and applied research on actinide and fission product chemistry and chemical separations at Argonne National Labora- tory for 20 years and in environmental science at the U.S. Geological Survey for 5 years. He is active in the Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Division and in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society. He is also co-editor in chief of the journal Solvent Extrac- tion and Ion Exchange, associate editor of the journal Radiochimica Acta, on the editorial board of the journal Separation Science and Technology, and co-editor of three symposium series books. Dr. Nash was a visit- ing scholar at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute at Tokai-mura in 2000, and is the 2003 recipient of the Glenn T. Seaborg Award for Actinide Separations. He completed his Ph.D. degree in inorganic chemistry at Florida State University in 1978.

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249 APPENDIX A Nenoff, Tina Dr. Tina Nenoff is currently a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories, in the Surface and Interface Sciences Orga- nization. She has been on the technical staff at Sandia for over 15 years. Her research interests include how the nanoscale properties of materials can be tuned to affect bulk scale properties. Her current research is directed toward the synthesis and then application of novel zeolitic and molecular sieve phases for catalysis and separations. Areas of focus include (1) the synthesis and characterization of novel inorganic molecular sieve materials and waste forms for the selection and storage of radiological isotopes; (2) the predictive modeling and synthesis of inorganic aluminosilicate and nonaluminosilicate crystalline zeolitic bulk phases and membranes for Sepa- rations and Catalysis of light gases or organic molecules; and (3) energy and cost efficient catalytic reactive separations of industrial feedstock chemicals. Her programs span from basic to applied research of novel inorganic mate- rials for separations and waste forms, catalysis and membrane applications. She has over 125 peer reviewed publications, 4 book chapters, and 7 U.S. Patents. Dr. Nenoff is a member of both the American Chemical Society and the Materials Research Society and is a reviewer for a number of journals. She received her Ph.D. degree in inorganic/solid state chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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