A

Select References

ARTICLES

Amato, I. 2007. Experiments of concern: Well-intentioned research, in the wrong hands, can become dangerous. Chemical and Engineering News 85(31):51-55.

Amato, I. 2009. Rebecca Kamen: A sculptor nurtures an elemental garden. Chemical and Engineering News 87(40):43-43.

Falk, J.H., and L.D. Dierking, 2010. The 95 percent solution (School is not where most Americans learn most of their science). American Scientist 98:486-493.

Friedman, A.J. 2010. The evolution of the science museum. Physics Today (October):45-51.

Halford, B. 2008. Stephen Lyons: A television producer’s take on what makes good chemistry for the small screen. Chemical and Engineering News 86(39):41.

Maltese, A.V., and R.H. Tai. 2010. Eyeballs in the fridge: Sources of early interest in science. International Journal of Science Education 32(5):669-685.

BOOKS

Ball, P. 1999. H2O: A Biography of Water. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson Ltd.

Bradley, C.A. 2009. The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. New York: Delacorte Press.

Emsley, J. 2008. Molecules of Murder: Criminal Molecules and Classic Cases. London: Royal Society of Chemistry.

Frankel, F., and G. M. Whitesides. 2009. No Small Matter: Science on the Nanoscale. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Griep, M., and M. Mikasen. 2009. ReAction! Chemistry in the Movies. New York: Oxford University Press.

Levi, P., R. Rosentha, and N. Ascherson. 1995. The Periodic Table. London: D. Campbell.

Sacks, O.W. 2001. Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Stephenson, N. 1995. The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer. New York: Bantam Dell.

NRC PUBLICATIONS

Philip Bell, Bruce Lewenstein, Andrew W. Shouse, and Michael A. Feder, Editors, Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments, National Research Council. 2009. Learning Science in Informal Environments. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Marilyn Fenichel and Heidi A. Schweingruber, National Research Council. 2010. Surrounded by Science. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.



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OCR for page 73
A Select References ARTICLES Emsley, J. 2008. Molecules of Murder: Criminal Molecules and Classic Cases. London: Royal Society of Chemistry. Amato, I. 2007. Experiments of concern: Well-intentioned Frankel, F., and G. M. Whitesides. 2009. No Small Matter: research, in the wrong hands, can become dangerous. Science on the Nanoscale. Cambridge: Harvard Univer- Chemical and Engineering News 85(31):51-55. sity Press. Amato, I. 2009. Rebecca Kamen: A sculptor nurtures an Griep, M., and M. Mikasen. 2009. ReAction! Chemistry in e lemental garden. C hemical and Engineering News the Movies. New York: Oxford University Press. 87(40):43-43. Levi, P., R. Rosentha, and N. Ascherson. 1995. The Periodic Falk, J.H., and L.D. Dierking, 2010. The 95 percent solution Table. London: D. Campbell. (School is not where most Americans learn most of their Sacks, O.W. 2001. Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical science). American Scientist 98:486-493. Boyhood. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Friedman, A.J. 2010. The evolution of the science museum. Stephenson, N. 1995. The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady’s Physics Today (October):45-51. Illustrated Primer. New York: Bantam Dell. Halford, B. 2008. Stephen Lyons: A television producer’s take on what makes good chemistry for the small screen. NRC PUBLICATIONS Chemical and Engineering News 86(39):41. Maltese, A.V., and R.H. Tai. 2010. Eyeballs in the fridge: Philip Bell, Bruce Lewenstein, Andrew W. Shouse, and Sources of early interest in science. International Journal Michael A. Feder, Editors, Committee on Learning Sci- of Science Education 32(5):669-685. ence in Informal Environments, National Research Coun- cil. 2009. Learning Science in Informal Environments. BOOKS Washington, DC: National Academies Press. Marilyn Fenichel and Heidi A. Schweingruber, National Ball, P. 1999. H2O: A Biography of Water. London: Weiden- Research Council. 2010. Surrounded by Science. Wash- feld & Nicolson Ltd. ington, DC: National Academies Press. Bradley, C.A. 2009. The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. New York: Delacorte Press. 73

OCR for page 73
74 APPENDIX A WEBSITES Chemical Heritage Foundation www.chemheritage.org Community Based Environmental Monitoring Network www.envnetwork.smu.ca/ Exploratorium www.exploratorium.edu/ Felice Frankel www.felicefrankel.com/ Forgotten Genius www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/julian/ Theodore Gray www.theodoregray.com/ The History Makers www.thehistorymakers.com/ Roald Hoffman www.roaldhoffmann.com/ Informal Science www.informalscience.org International Year of Chemistry 2011 www.chemistry2011.org Molecularium www.moleculestothemax.com/ Marvelous Molecules www.nyhallsci.org/marvelousmolecules/ Nanoscale Informal Science Education www.nisenet.org/ Periodic Table of Videos www.periodicvideos.com/ Science and Entertainment Exchange www.scienceandentertainmentexchange.org/ Science Cafés www.sciencecafes.org/ Science Cheerleader www.sciencecheerleader.com/ Science is Fun www.scifun.org/ World Water Monitoring Day www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/