Appendix C

Biographies of Speakers
1

 

 

 

 

Bruce Babbitt is a former U.S. secretary of the interior. He was governor of Arizona for nine years, 1978–1987, and attorney general of Arizona, 1975–1978. Mr. Babbitt, who was in the private practice of law when he was nominated to be interior secretary, also was national president of the nonpartisan, nonprofit League of Conservation Voters. In 1978 he served as a member of the President’s Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. He was a founding member of the Democratic Leadership Council and served as chairman of the Democratic Governors Association in 1985. Mr. Babbitt has been a member of the Advisory Council on Intergovernmental Relations and was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Grand Canyon Trust. Described by the Almanac of American Politics as one of America’s most original governors, his advocacy led to passage of a nationally acclaimed state water management code in 1980, and in 1986 of a water quality act described by the Los Angeles Times as perhaps “the nation’s toughest law to protect underground water.” Mr. Babbitt received a master’s degree in geophysics from the University of Newcastle in England, which he attended as a Marshall Scholar. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1965.

Scott Barrett is the Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics at Columbia University, where he also serves as vice dean of the School of International and Public Affairs. Professor Barrett previously

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1 Biographies were current at the time of the symposium.



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Appendix C Biographies of Speakers1 Bruce Babbitt is a former U.S. secretary of the interior. He was governor of Arizona for nine years, 1978–1987, and attorney general of Arizona, 1975–1978. Mr. Babbitt, who was in the private practice of law when he was nominated to be interior secretary, also was national president of the nonpartisan, nonprofit League of Conservation Voters. In 1978 he served as a member of the President’s Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Is- land. He was a founding member of the Democratic Leadership Council and served as chairman of the Democratic Governors Association in 1985. Mr. Babbitt has been a member of the Advisory Council on Intergovernmental Relations and was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Grand Canyon Trust. Described by the Almanac of American Politics as one of America’s most original governors, his advocacy led to passage of a nation- ally acclaimed state water management code in 1980, and in 1986 of a water quality act described by the Los Angeles Times as perhaps “the nation’s toughest law to protect underground water.” Mr. Babbitt received a master’s degree in geophysics from the University of Newcastle in England, which he attended as a Marshall Scholar. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1965. Scott Barrett is the Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics at Columbia University, where he also serves as vice dean of the School of International and Public Affairs. Professor Barrett previously Biographies were current at the time of the symposium. 1 57

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58 APPENDIX C served on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Before serving Johns Hopkins, Professor Barrett taught at the London Business School, where he was also dean of the Executive MBA Program. Professor Barrett’s research focuses on interactions between natural and social systems, especially at the global level. He is best known for his work involving international environmental agreements, such as the Kyoto Protocol. Professor Barrett’s work on international environment agreements earned him the Erik Kempe Award in Environmental and Re- source Economics, bestowed by the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. Published in 2007, Professor Barrett’s book Why Cooperate? The Incentive to Supply Global Public Goods examines issues such as nuclear proliferation, infectious disease pandemics, overfishing, and the standard for determining the time to international development. His book on international environmental agreements, Environment and Statecraft: The Strategy of Environmental Treaty-Making, was published in 2003. Pro- fessor Barrett has advised international organizations, including different agencies of the United Nations, the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the European Commission, the Independent World Commission on the Oceans, the International Union for Conservation of Nature Commission on Environmental Law, and the International Task Force on Global Public Goods. He was a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change second assessment report. He was previously a member of the academic panel of advisors for the U.K. Department of Environment. Professor Barrett holds a Ph.D. in economics from the London School of Economics. Ann Bartuska is the deputy chief for the U.S. Forest Service Research and Development. An ecosystem ecologist, she has been involved with the issues of forest ecosystem health, ecosystem management, wetlands, and air pollu- tion, both within the federal government and at North Carolina State Uni- versity. Her past research has focused on ecosystems processes in landscapes disturbed by coal mining. She has extensive experience interacting with Congress, the media, federal and state agencies, and the public. Dr. Bartuska is an active member and pastpresident (2002–2003) of the Ecological Society of America. She has served on the Board of the Council of Science Society Presidents and is a member of the Society of American Foresters. Dr. Bartuska received her Ph.D. in ecology from West Virginia University.

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59 APPENDIX C Rodney J. Brown is dean of agriculture and a professor in the Department of Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences at Utah State University. He spent two years at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel before beginning his academic career in 1979 as an assistant professor at Utah State University, where he has served as head of the Department of Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences; director of the Western Dairy Center; and acting vice president for research. Dr. Brown has been active in the Institute of Food Technologists, American Dairy Science Association, Council for Agricul- tural Science and Technology, International Dairy Commission, Sigma Xi, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, and Phi Kappa Phi. He is chair of the Board on Agriculture of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. He has received the American Dairy Science Association Pfizer, Inc. Award for Cheese and Cultured Products Research, the Utah State University Leone Leadership Award, the Honored Alumnus Award from the College of Biol- ogy and Agriculture at Brigham Young University, and was the G. Malcolm Trout Visiting Scholar in the Department of Food Science and Human Nu- trition at Michigan State University. Dr. Brown received his Ph.D. in food science from North Carolina State University, with emphases on chemistry and biochemistry. James P. Collins is the associate director for biological sciences at the Na- tional Science Foundation (NSF), where he oversees the NSF’s nearly $580 million annual investment in fundamental biological research and serves on the foundation’s senior management team. As an investigator, Dr. Collins has focused on how subgroups within a species physically change in response to ecological and evolutionary pressures, and the role of pathogens in the global decline of amphibians. He chairs the task force on declining amphib- ian populations of the International Union for Conservation of Nature. In addition, he has concentrated on the intellectual history of ecology and has taken an active role in Arizona State University’s successful curriculum- enhancement and mentoring programs for undergraduates. Dr. Collins has substantial prior experience with the NSF in his roles as program director, research awardee, and chairman of the external Directorate for the Biological Sciences Advisory Committee (BIO AC). He also represented BIO AC on NSF’s Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education. Dr. Collins received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

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60 APPENDIX C Christopher Costello is an associate professor of resource economics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research is primarily in the area of natural resource management and property rights under uncertainty, with a particular emphasis on information, its value, and its effect on management decisions. He is also interested in the process and design of adaptive manage- ment programs in which learning (to resolve uncertainty or asymmetric infor- mation) is actively pursued. Topical interests include fisheries management, biological diversity, introduced species, regulation of polluting industries, and marine policy. Dr. Costello frequently collaborates with researchers in fields outside of economics, such as statistics, ecology, biogeography, and mathematics. He has authored and coauthored many publications and serves on several councils and boards, such as the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the Science Advisory Team for California’s Ocean Protection Council. Dr. Costello received his Ph.D. in agricultural and re- source economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Sandra Díaz is a senior permanent research fellow at the National University of Córdoba in Argentina, where she researches and teaches in the field of community ecology and biogeography. Her fields of interest are community ecology, plant functional types, and global environmental change. Profes- sor Díaz has made contributions to the understanding of plant functional types and their links to ecosystem processes and services. She is involved in multidisciplinary projects linking natural and social aspects of environmen- tal vulnerability and sustainability. In recent years, Professor Díaz has been actively involved in international initiatives related to global change, such as the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems Core Project of International Geosphere-Biosphere Program, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the Convention on Biological Diversity. Michael Donoghue is the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University and vice president for West Campus Planning and Program Development. His research revolves around understanding phylogeny, and his empirical work focuses primarily on plant diversity and evolution. In particular, he has long-term interests in Viburnum and Dipsacales, and in the origin and early evolution of flowering plants. In collaboration with former students, postdocs, and lab visitors, Dr. Donoghue has also published molecular phylogenetic analyses of other angiosperm groups. And, with former postdoc David Hibbett, he has published a series of papers on the phylogeny of basidiomycetes, especially shiitake mushrooms.

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61 APPENDIX C He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1997, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2005, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2008. He has published more than 180 scientific papers, coauthored a popular text - book on plant diversity, and coedited Assembling the Tree of Life. He has men- tored 25 postdoctoral associates and 22 graduate students. Dr. Donoghue received his Ph.D. in botany from Harvard University. Paul Falkowski is the Board of Governors’ Professor of Marine and Geo- logical Sciences at Rutgers University. His research interests include biogeo- chemical cycles, photosynthesis, biological oceanography, molecular biology, biochemistry and biophysics, physiological adaptation, plant physiology, evolution, mathematical modeling, and symbiosis. He has been elected to many learned societies, including the American Geophysical Union, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sci- ences. He has also received many awards, including the Huntsman Award, the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award, and the European Geosciences Union Vernadsky Medal. Dr. Falkowski received his Ph.D. in biology and biophysics from the University of British Columbia. Mary M. Glackin is the deputy under secretary for operations at the Na- tional Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In this role she is responsible for the day-to-day management of NOAA’s domestic and international operations for oceanic and atmospheric services, research, and coastal and marine stewardship. Ms. Glackin has more than 15 years of senior executive–level experience working in numerous NOAA line of- fices. She served as the acting assistant administrator for weather services and director of the National Weather Service (NWS) from June 12, 2007, through September 15, 2007. Before that, she was the assistant administra- tor for the NOAA’s Office of Program Planning and Integration. From 1999 until 2002, she served as the deputy assistant administrator for the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of NOAA. She has worked as the program manager for the Advanced Weather Interactive Pro- cessing System with the NWS. Before that, Ms. Glackin was both a meteo- rologist and computer specialist in various positions within NOAA, where she was responsible for introducing improvements into NWS operations by capitalizing on new technology systems and scientific models. She received the Presidential Rank Award (2001 and 2009), the Charles Brooks Award for Outstanding Services to the American Meteorological Society (2004),

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62 APPENDIX C the NOAA Bronze Medal (2001), the Federal 100 Information Technology Manager Award (1999), the NOAA Administrator’s Award (1993), and the Department of Commerce Silver Medal Award (1991). She is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and a member of the National Weather Association and the American Geophysical Union. Ms. Glackin received her B.S. degree from the University of Maryland. Rebecca Goldburg is the director of marine science at the Pew Environment Group, which is the conservation arm of the Pew Charitable Trusts. Trained as an ecologist, Dr. Goldburg is active in public policy issues concerning food production—primarily ecological and food safety issues in agricultural biotechnology, aquaculture (fish farming), and antibiotic resistance from overuse of antibiotics in agriculture. Dr. Goldburg is a member of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology, the U.S. State Department’s U.S.-EU Consultative Forum on Biotechnology, and the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board. She recently served on the National Academy of Science’s Committee on Geneti- cally Modified Pest-Protected Plants. Dr. Goldburg is a frequent speaker and an author of numerous publications, including Biotechnology’s Bitter Harvest: Herbicide Tolerant Crops and the Threat to Sustainable Agriculture (Biotech- nology Working Group, 1990), A Mutable Feast: Assuring Food Safety in an Era of Genetic Engineering (Environmental Defense Fund [EDF], 1991), Murky Waters: Environmental Effects of Aquaculture in the United States (EDF, 1997), and “Effect of Aquaculture on World Fish Supplies” (Nature, 2000). Dr. Goldburg holds a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Minnesota. Andrew Hendry is a professor at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. He was born in California, grew up in Alberta, went to university in Victoria, did his graduate work in Seattle, and did postdoctoral work in Vancouver and Massachusetts. His research focuses on how evolutionary changes in natural populations, particularly on how rapidly populations can adapt to changing environmental conditions. He has worked on salmon in Alaska and New Zealand, guppies in Trinidad, stickleback fishes in British Columbia, lemon sharks in the Bahamas, and Darwin’s finches in the Galapagos. Taken as a whole, his work has shown that populations experiencing environmental change can show rapid evolutionary responses that may improve the ability of those populations to persist. Dr. Hendry’s most recent work examines how these evolutionary changes may affect the rest of the environment; that is, rapid evolution may have considerable ecological consequences.

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63 APPENDIX C Ann Marie Kimball is a professor of epidemiology and health services at the University of Washington and director of the Asia-Pacific Economic Coop- eration Emerging Infections Network. Her research interests include global trade and infectious disease, emerging infections, surveillance and informat- ics, and global health policy for infectious disease control. Dr. Kimball has authored several publications and completed both her medical degree and her master’s in public health at the University of Washington. Christian Körner is a professor in the Institute of Botany at the University of Basel, Switzerland. His current research projects include the influence of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration on natural vegetation including the Swiss Canopy Crane project, which studies the effects of expos- ing a naturally grown mature forest to a future carbon dioxide concentration), alpine plant ecology and biodiversity, global comparisons of high-elevation tree-line research, implications of climate change in the Mediterranean, and various projects in bioclimatology. Dr. Körner is a member of many acad- emies, national committees, and international committees, and has been honored with many awards and academic achievements. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Innsbruck, Austria. David Lodge is a professor of biology at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include conservation biology, especially the overlap- ping spheres of interest that relate to current global changes. Dr. Lodge, his students, and postdocs have conducted field work in the inland lakes and streams of northern Indiana–southern Michigan, the upper peninsula of Michigan (for the University of Notre Dame Environmental Research Cen- ter), the Great Lakes, the coastal plain of North Carolina, and in Denmark and Kenya. As a way to inform policy, Dr. Lodge has participated in the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program at Stanford University, served as chair of the na- tional Invasive Species Advisory Committee, testified before a congressional committee, and published an op-ed piece in the New York Times. Dr. Lodge has authored many publications and has received many awards. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Oxford. Mark Lonsdale is the chief of entomology at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization in Canberra, Australia. His research interests include biological invasions, ecological implications of genetically modified organisms, environmental risk assessment, biological control of weeds, and plant population ecology. Dr. Lonsdale has authored many pub-

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64 APPENDIX C lications and serves as a member of the Editorial Board for Biological Invasions and chair of the Global Invasive Species Program. Dr. Lonsdale worked in Darwin, Northern Territory, until 1995, and researched the impact of inva- sive weeds on biodiversity, especially Mimosa pigra; intersectoral conflict in plant introductions; the effects of weed biological control on plant popula- tions; rates of spread of exotic weeds, the impacts of fire on tropical savannas; and seed bank ecology. Dr. Lonsdale received his Ph.D. from the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom. His doctoral research was on plant popula- tion ecology, specifically, thinning in pure and mixed populations of plants. Yadvinder Malhi is a professor of ecosystem science at the Oxford University Center for the Environment, University of Oxford, program leader of the Ecosystems Group at the Environmental Change Institute, and the Jack- son Senior Research Fellow at Oriel College, Oxford. Dr. Malhi is also an honorary research fellow at the Institute of the Atmosphere and Biosphere, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, and at the Institute of the Environment at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research addresses fundamental questions about ecosystem function and dynamics, while providing outputs of direct relevance for conservation and adaptation to climate change. A particular new focus is on the role that the international carbon markets and climate change framework can play in protecting tropical forests. He applies a range of techniques, including field physiological studies, large-scale and long-term ecological monitoring, satellite remote-sensing and geographic information systems, ecosystem modeling, and micrometeoro- logical techniques. Dr. Malhi has authored many publications and received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Reading. Steve Polasky is the Fesler-Lampert Professor of Ecological/Environmental Economics at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include eco- system services, natural capital, biodiversity conservation, endangered spe- cies policy, integrating ecological and economic analysis, renewable energy, environmental regulation, and common property resources. His papers have been published in Biological Conservation, Ecological Applications, Journal of Economics Perspectives, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, International Economic Review, Land Economics, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Science, and other journals. He has served as coeditor and associate editor for the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and as associate editor for the International Journal of Business and Economics, and he now serves as an associate editor for Conservation

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65 APPENDIX C Letters and Ecology and Society. Dr. Polasky received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Alison Power is a professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University. She is a member of Cornell’s Graduate Fields of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Entomology, International Agriculture, and Conser- vation and Sustainable Development, and the Latin American Studies Pro- gram. She also serves as dean of the Graduate School. Her research focuses on biodiversity conservation in managed ecosystems, interactions between agricultural and natural ecosystems, agroecology, the ecology and evolution of plant pathogens, invasive species, and tropical ecology. She leads a working group on the roles of natural enemies and mutuality in plant invasions at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). Dr. Power serves as vice president for public affairs for the Ecological Society of America and as the Presidential University Fellow of the Nature Conservancy. She also serves on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on California Agricultural Research Priorities and the McKnight Foundation Oversight Committee of the Collaborative Crop Research Program. Dr. Power’s past activities include serving on the NCEAS Science Advisory Board, the NRC Committee on Sustainable Agriculture and Environment in the Humid Tropics, the Executive Committee of the Organization for Tropical Studies, the Environmental Protection Agency Scientific Advisory Panel on Transgen- ic Bt Crops, the Sustainable Biosphere Initiative Steering Committee of the Ecological Society of America, and the Technical Committee of the Sustain- able Agriculture and Natural Resource Management, Collaborative Research Support Program, of the U.S. Agency for International Development. Dr. Power received her Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Washington. Peter Raven is the president of the Missouri Botanical Garden and George Engelmann Professor of Botany at Washington University. Dr. Raven’s re- search interests include Onagraceae, conservation, sustainable development, and plant geography. He received the Arthur Hoyt Scott Medal and the National Medal of Science, and he was a member of former president Bill Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. In 2000 the American Society of Plant Taxonomists established the Peter Raven Award in his honor to be conferred to authors with outstanding contributions to plant taxonomy and “for exceptional efforts at outreach to non-scientists.” Dr. Raven is possibly best known for his important work Coevolution of Insects

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66 APPENDIX C and Plants, published in the journal Evolution in 1964, which he coauthored with Paul R. Ehrlich. Since then he has authored numerous scientific and popular papers, many on the evening primrose family, Onagraceae. Dr. Raven is also an author of the widely used textbook Biology of Plants, now in its seventh edition, coauthored with Ray F. Evert and Susan E. Eichhorn (both of the University of Wisconsin, Madison). Dr. Raven received his Ph.D. in botany from the University of California, Los Angeles. Andrew Revkin is a journalist and author who, since the mid-1980s, has spent a quarter of a century covering subjects ranging from the assault on the Amazon to the Asian tsunami, from the troubled relationship of science and politics to climate change at the North Pole. From 1995 through 2009, he reported on the environment for the New York Times. In 2003, Mr. Revkin became the first Times reporter to file stories from the North Pole area, and in 2008 he became the first science reporter to win a John Chancellor Award from Columbia University. In 2010 he is joining Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies as senior fellow for environmental under- standing. Mr. Revkin has also authored books on the Arctic, the Amazon, and global warming, including The North Pole was Here, which was published in 2006. Two films have been based on his work, including The Burning Season, which was based on his biography of Chico Mendes. Mr. Revkin received a B.S. in biology from Brown University and an M.S. in journalism from Columbia University. Philip Robertson is the University Distinguished Professor of Ecosystem Science in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Michigan State Uni- versity. Dr. Robertson’s research interests include the biogeochemistry and ecology of field crop ecosystems, including biofuel systems and, in particular, nitrogen and carbon dynamics, greenhouse gas fluxes, and the functional significance of microbial diversity in these systems. His undergraduate teach- ing includes agricultural ecology, biogeochemistry, and soil biology courses. His service includes current membership on the U.S. Department of Energy Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee, past member- ship on the U.S. Carbon Cycle Scientific Steering Committee, chairman- ships of competitive grants panels at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA, the National Research Initiative [NRI] and Fund for Rural America Programs), and membership on several National Science Foundation panels in the biological and geosciences directorates. He served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee to Evaluate the USDA NRI Program

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67 APPENDIX C (1998–1999), and chaired the Environment Subcommittee of the NRC Committee on Opportunities in Agriculture (2000–2002). He has testified before the U.S. Senate Agriculture, Forestry, and Nutrition Committee and has participated in briefings on science, technology, and agriculture for U.S. House and Senate committees. He has also served as an editor for the journals Ecology, Ecological Monographs, Plant and Soil, and Biogeochemistry. In 2003 he was elected a fellow in the Soil Science Society of America. Dr. Robertson received his Ph.D. in biology from Indiana University. Cristián Samper is the director of the National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution. As its director, Dr. Samper is responsible for the largest natural history collection in the world and a museum that wel- comes more than 6 million visitors each year. Since his arrival in 2003, Dr. Samper has reinvigorated the research staff by hiring new curators to replace retiring staff, built major new collections storage facilities and laboratories, and raised more than $100 million to support new long-term exhibitions and programs, including the Encyclopedia of Life and the Sant Ocean Hall. Known for his work in the ecology of the Andean cloud forests, conservation biology, and environmental policy, Dr. Samper sits on the boards of direc- tors for the American Association of Museums, the Center for International Forestry Research, and the Nature Conservancy. Dr. Samper was the founder and first director of the Alexander von Humboldt Institute, which is the national biodiversity research institute of Colombia. He was responsible for developing Colombia’s National Biodiversity Policy and promoting research on biological inventories, conservation biology, and sustainable use of biodi- versity. At the same time, he served as chief science adviser for biodiversity for the Colombian government and served on the boards of many environmental institutions. For his contributions, he was awarded the National Medal of the Environment by the president of Colombia in 2001. Dr. Samper received his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University. José Sarukhán is a professor in the Institute of Ecology at the National Uni- versity of Mexico. He holds numerous honorary doctoral degrees from such institutions as New York University, University of Wales, and Main National University of San Marcos in Lima, Peru, and the University of Colima, Uni- versity of Hidalgo, and Graduate College in Mexico. Dr. Sarukhán has played very important roles in the establishment of biosphere reserves and biological research stations in Mexico. He has also held officer appointments in many professional organizations and has been appointed as scientific advisor to

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68 APPENDIX C many international committees addressing problems of the environment. He has published nearly 100 papers and 7 books on tropical ecology, plant population ecology, ecology, and biodiversity and handbooks on weeds and tropical trees of Mexico, as well as many publications on higher education and scientific development in Mexico. Dr. Sarukhán received his Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Wales. Rodger Schlickeisen is the president and chief executive officer (CEO) of Defenders of Wildlife. Under his leadership, Defenders has grown from 62,000 members and activists to more than 1 million and is recognized as one of the nation’s prominent conservation advocacy organizations. Before joining Defenders, Dr. Schlickeisen was CEO of Craver, Mathews, Smith and Company, a leading consulting firm for progressive advocacy organizations. He also served in the Carter White House as associate director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and as chief of staff to U.S. Senator Max Baucus. Dr. Schlickeisen is also president of Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund, a political nonprofit that works to elect a proconservation Congress and White House, and to advance conservation programs and policies. He was the founding chair of the nonprofit Partnership Project, established to help build a more unified and potent national environmental movement. He also serves on the advisory committees of the Earth Communications Organization and the Environmental Media Association. He is the author of numerous published opinion pieces and articles, including an influential law review article on the need for a constitutional amendment to protect the natural environment for future generations. Dr. Schlickeisen received his Ph.D. in finance from George Washington University. Steve Schneider (deceased, 2010) is a professor of biology and codirector for the Center for Environmental Science and Policy at Stanford University. Internationally recognized for research, policy analysis, and outreach in climate change, Dr. Schneider focuses on climate change science, integrated assessment of ecological and economic impacts of human-induced climate change, and identifying viable climate policies and technological solutions. He has consulted with federal agencies and White House staff in the Nixon, Carter, Reagan, G. H. W. Bush, Clinton, and G. W. Bush administrations. Actively involved with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), an initiative of the United Nations Environment Program and the World Meteorological Organization, since its origin in 1988, Dr. Schneider was coauthor of Uncertainties in the IPCC Third Assessment Report: Recom-

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69 APPENDIX C mendations to Lead Authors for More Consistent Assessment and Reporting (2000) and Cross-cutting Theme Paper 4: Assessing the Science to Address UNFCCC Article 2 (2004). He has been a contributor to all four IPCC as- sessment reports and is a coordinating lead author of Climate Change 2007: Working Group II: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, Chapter 19, “As- sessing Key Vulnerabilities and the Risk from Climate Change.” He was also a member of the core writing team for the 2001 IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the 2007 Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). In addition, he has authored, coauthored, or edited more than 400 scientific papers, pro- ceedings, legislative testimonies, books and book chapters, and has written more than 200 book reviews, editorials, and other pieces for popular media. Currently, Dr. Schneider is counseling policy makers about the importance of using risk management strategies in climate-policy decision making, given the uncertainties in future projections of global climate change and related impacts. In addition to continuing to serve as advisor to decision makers, he consults with corporate executives and other stakeholders in industry and the nonprofit sectors about possible climate-related events and is actively engaged in improving public understanding of science and the environment through extensive media communication and public outreach. Dr. Schneider received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and plasma physics from Columbia University. Achim Steiner is the executive director of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and an expert on environmental matters. His professional track record in the fields of sustainable development policy and environ- mental management; his first-hand knowledge of civil society, governmental, and international organizations; and his global experience spanning five continents make him an excellent choice to lead UNEP. Mr. Steiner serves on many international advisory boards, including the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and the En- vironmental Advisory Council of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Mr. Steiner received his M.A. in economics and regional plan- ning from the University of London, specializing in development economics, regional planning, and international development and environment policy. David Tilman is the Regents Professor and Distinguished McKnight Univer- sity Professor at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include the ecological effects of human domination of the earth, including effects on ecosystem services of value to society; the ecological mechanisms controlling

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70 APPENDIX C speciation, community assembly, species invasions, and the evolution and maintenance of biodiversity; population ecology and theory of community dynamics and biodiversity; the role of resource competition; biodiversity and ecosystem functioning; and the effects of habitat destruction. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences, was the founding editor of the journal Ecological Is- sues, and has served on editorial boards of nine scholarly journals, including Science. He serves on the Advisory Board for the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany. He has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and a fellow of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. Dr. Tilman has received the Ecological Society of America’s Cooper Award and its MacArthur Award, the Botanical Society of America’s Centennial Award, and the Princeton Environmental Prize, and he was named a Guggenheim fellow. He has written 2 books, edited 3 books, and published more than 200 papers in peer-reviewed literature, including more than 30 papers in Science, Nature, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. The Institute for Scientific Information designated him as the world’s most highly cited environmental scientist of the decade for 1990–2000 and for 1996–2006. Dr. Tilman received his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Michigan. Justin Ward is the vice president of business practices within Conserva- tion International’s (CI) Center for Environmental Leadership in Business (CELB). During the last several years, he has directed CELB’s industry program activities on agriculture, forestry, and fisheries, working with major companies such as Wal-Mart, Starbucks, McDonald’s, Office Depot, and International Paper. Before joining CI, Mr. Ward was a senior policy spe- cialist with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). During more than 17 years with NRDC, he directed the organization’s activities on farm policy, international trade, and global forest conservation. He is the author of numerous publications and the recipient of a 1988 Agricultural Conservation Award from the American Farmland Trust. In 1996, Mr. Ward was elected to a 3-year term on the international Board of Directors of the Forest Stew- ardship Council, and he serves as coleader of the Forests Dialogue, a multi- stakeholder forum hosted by the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Mr. Ward received his M.A. from the University of Minnesota.

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71 APPENDIX C Boris Worm is an associate professor in marine conservation biology at Dal- housie University in Nova Scotia. He has made leading scientific contribu- tions to the fields of marine ecology and fisheries conservation. His interests focus on global patterns and changes in marine biodiversity, and specifically in understanding how these patterns were created and how they are changing, particularly in response to perturbations such as fishing and climate change. Dr. Worm also has an active interest in marine conservation and ecosystem management, particularly in the conservation of large marine predators. He has authored and coauthored many publications and has served on several boards. Dr. Worm received his Ph.D. from the University of Kiel, Germany.

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