TABLE C-14 Illustration of Supplements Encountered Among TBI patients, Ranging from Mild to Severe Injuries (JAHVH from 8/20/2010–9/20/2010)

Antioxidant vitamins

Cinnamon

Ginseng

Omega-6 fatty acids

Apigenin

Citric Acid

Green tea

Resveratrol

B Vitamins (mega-doses)

CoEnzyme Q10

Huperzine

RNA

Baicalein Butcher’s Broom

Cognitex (a-glyceryl phosphoryl choline, ginger, rosemary, phosphatidylserine, pregnolone, vinpocentine, leucoselect phytosome, wild blueberry, sensoril ashwagandha, perluxan)

Individual amino acids or blends (most commonly: branched chain, tyrosine, glutamine, arginine)

Rutin

Caffeine

Corella

Lipoic acid

Spirulina

Capsaicin

Creatine

Luteolin

St. John’s wart

Carnitine (L-configuration)

Curcumin

Magnesium

Tocopherol

Carnosine (L-configuration)

D-Ribose

Milk thistle

Valarian root

Catechin

Feverfew

Mycelia extract

Vinpoceti

Choline

Ginkgo biloba

n-3 fatty acids

Zinc

CONCLUSION

Nutritional assessment, monitoring, and evaluation should be a priority throughout the course of TBI and polytrauma injuries among active-duty service members. Registered dietitians have the educational background to coordinate acute nutritional support and subacute nutritional management based on the variety of nutritional conditions prevalent following TBI. Furthermore, a multidisciplinary team approach is critical to discuss progress, treatment plans, and goals for overall best outcomes.

REFERENCES

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