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B Speaker Biosketches Marice Ashe, J.D., M.P.H., is executive director of Public Health Law and Policy, a nonprofit national technical assistance center offering public health leaders access to high-quality legal resources for public health campaigns related to both chronic and communicable disease control. In this position, she has launched and directs multiple pioneering efforts to improve public health outcomes through the use of law and policy. Ms. Ashe directs the National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obe- sity, which is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as part of its $500 million commitment to reversing the childhood obesity epidemic by 2015. She directs Planning for Healthy Places, which integrates built environment and economic development strategies into public health prac- tice. She also directs the Technical Assistance Legal Center, funded by the California Department of Public Health to provide legal technical assistance to tobacco control advocates statewide. Ms. Ashe is a frequent speaker at public health conferences throughout the nation, and she consults with federal and state agencies on how best to incorporate legal and policy tools into public health strategies. She is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame, and received her M.P.H. and J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Kelly D. Brownell, Ph.D., is professor of psychology, professor of epidemi- ology and public health, and director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University. Earlier, he was a professor in the Depart- ment of Psychiatry and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. His work is focused on environmental factors that contribute to obesity 83

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84 LEGAL STRATEGIES IN CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION and eating disorders; the specific effects of the “toxic environment” that encourages overeating and physical inactivity; bias, prejudice, discrimina- tion, and obesity; cognitive factors that affect body image and associated psychological factors; food prices and food consumption patterns; dietary and exercise interventions in schools; reactions to obesity surgery; and pub - lic policy as a means of changing eating and activity in the population. His paper on “Understanding and Preventing Relapse,” published in American Psychologist, was identified as one of the ten most frequently cited papers in psychology. Dr. Brownell has served as president of the Society of Behav- ioral Medicine, the Division of Health Psychology of the American Psycho- logical Association, and the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy, and has served on the board of directors of other organizations, including the North American Association for the Study of Obesity and the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Dr. Brownell received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Rutgers University after completing an internship at Brown University. He is a member of the IOM and its Stand- ing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. William H. Dietz, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Preven- tion and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prior to his appointment to CDC, he was a professor of pediatrics at the Tufts University School of Medicine and director of clinical nutri- tion at the Floating Hospital of New England Medical Center Hospitals. In addition to his academic responsibilities in Boston, Dr. Dietz was a princi- pal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)/ Harvard Division of Health Science and Technology; associate director of the Clinical Research Center at MIT; and director of the Boston Obesity/ Nutrition Research Center, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). He has been a counselor for the American Society for Clinical Nutrition and is past president of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. In 1995 he received the John Stalker Award from the American School Food Service Association for his efforts to improve school lunches. Dr. Dietz served on the 1995 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, is a past member of the NIDDK Task Force on Obesity, and is former president of the then American Society for Clinical Nutrition. He received a B.A. from Wesleyan University, an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in nutritional biochem- istry from MIT. Dr. Dietz is a member of the IOM, where he serves on the Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. Scott Faber, J.D., is vice president for federal affairs for the Grocery Manu- facturers Association (GMA). In this role, he oversees policy development

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85 APPENDIX B and advocacy for GMA, which represents more than 300 food, beverage, and consumer product companies. Prior to joining GMA, he served as an expert on food, agriculture, and water policies for two national environ- mental organizations. He serves on the board of directors for Protected Harvest, a farming standards certification organization, and has served on federal advisory committees on agriculture and energy issues. Mr. Faber holds a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Robert García, J.D., is executive director, counsel, and founder of The City Project in Los Angeles, California. He has extensive experience in public policy and legal advocacy, mediation, and litigation involving com- plex social justice, civil rights, human health, environmental, educational, and criminal justice matters. Mr. García’s work in the past decade has focused on equal access to park, school, and health resources throughout Los Angeles and California. He previously served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York under John Martin and Rudolph W. Giuliani, prosecuting organized crime, public corruption, and international narcotics trafficking cases. Also in New York, he practiced international litigation at a large law firm. Mr. Garcia served as western regional counsel with the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc. He has taught at Stanford Law School and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Law School, where he also serves as a senior fellow in the UCLA School of Public Policy and Social Research. The Planning and Conservation League named the Robert García Environmental Justice Award in his honor for his efforts toward improving the environment in California, and he is also a recipient of the President’s Award from the California Attorneys for Criminal Justice. Mr. García received his B.A. and J.D. from Stanford University. Mark Gottlieb, J.D., is executive director of the Public Health Advocacy Institute at Northeastern University School of Law in Boston. He joined the staff of the Public Health Advocacy Institute in 1993 after graduating from law school. His efforts have focused on researching tobacco litigation as a public health strategy as director of the Tobacco Products Liability Project; reducing the harm caused by secondhand tobacco smoke through a variety of legal and policy approaches; fostering scholarship using tobacco industry documents; and, more recently, examining legal and policy approaches to addressing obesity. Recently, Mr. Gottlieb’s focus has been on understand- ing how environmental contexts (legal, social, and political) enhance or impede the effectiveness of health interventions. Mr. Gottlieb received a B.A. from New College of Florida and a J.D. from Northeastern University School of Law.

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86 LEGAL STRATEGIES IN CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D., is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a nonprofit health advocacy organization supported largely by the 850,000 subscribers to its Nutrition Action Healthletter. CSPI focuses its advocacy against obesity, cardiovas- cular disease, and other health problems, using tactics ranging from educa- tion to legislation to litigation. CSPI led efforts to win passage of the 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, a law requiring warning notices on alcoholic beverage labels, and a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation requiring that trans fats be listed on foods labels. CSPI’s stud- ies on the nutritional quality of restaurant meals have helped spur major chains to add more healthful items to their menus. CSPI also has eliminated many deceptive food labels and ads through formal complaints to govern- ment agencies, discussions with companies, and litigation. Dr. Jacobson has written numerous books and reports, including Nutrition Scoreboard, Six Arguments for a Greener Diet, Salt: the Forgotten Killer, and Liquid Candy: How Soft Drinks Are Harming Americans’ Health. He holds a Ph.D. in microbiology from MIT. James Krieger, M.D., M.P.H., is chief of the Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Section at the Seattle-King County Public Health Department and clinical professor of medicine and health services and attending phy- sician at the University of Washington. His current public health work focuses on interventions to reduce health disparities in obesity, diabetes, asthma, tobacco, healthy eating, and active living by addressing social and physical environmental determinants of health. Dr. Krieger has played a key role in the development and evaluation of the Seattle-King County menu labeling regulation and in current work to limit the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. He is currently principal investigator for three National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants: evaluating the effectiveness of community health worker home visits for adults with asthma and for adults with diabetes, and assessing the effectiveness of community-led policy and systems change to increase physical activity at public housing sites. Previ- ous studies have assessed the impact of home visits and improved housing conditions on children with asthma. Dr. Krieger also has initiated and played a lead role in multiple community-based partnerships that address health inequities, including REACH, Steps, Allies Against Asthma (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation), and Food and Fitness (Kellogg’s). He has authored more than 35 peer-reviewed publications and numerous book chapters. Dr. Krieger was a member of the IOM Committee on Childhood Obesity Action for Local Governments. He is chair of the National Asso- ciation of County and City Health Officials Big Cities Chronic Disease Community of Practice, which focuses on public health policy actions to address healthy eating and active living. He has received numerous awards

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87 APPENDIX B for his work, including the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’s) Innovation in Prevention Award. Dr. Krieger received his under- graduate degree at Harvard; completed medical training at the University of California, San Francisco in internal medicine; and received his M.P.H. degree at the University of Washington. Shiriki K. Kumanyika, Ph.D., M.S.W., M.P.H., R.D., is professor of epi- demiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology and Pedi- atrics (Gastroenterology, Nutrition Section) and associate dean for health promotion and disease prevention at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Her interdisciplinary background integrates epidemiology, nutrition, prevention, minority health, and women’s health issues across the life course. The main themes of Dr. Kumanyika’s research concern the role of nutritional factors in the primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases, with a particular focus on obesity, sodium reduction, and related health problems such as hypertension and diabetes. She has a particular interest in the epidemiology and management of obesity among African Americans. Dr. Kumanyika has served on numerous national and international advisory committees and expert panels related to nutrition and obesity, and currently serves as vice chair of the HHS Secretary’s Advi- sory Committee for Healthy People 2020. She is co-chair of the Interna- tional Obesity Task Force and serves as a consultant to the World Health Organization’s Department of Nutrition for Health and Development. Dr. Kumanyika served as a member of the IOM Food and Nutrition Board, chair of the IOM Committee on an Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making, and a member of the IOM Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth. She is currently chair of the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. She received a B.A. from Syracuse University, an M.S.W. from Columbia University, a Ph.D. in human nutrition from Cornell University, and an M.P.H. from The Johns Hopkins University. She is a member of the IOM. Michael M. Landa, J.D., is acting director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, FDA. His official position of record is deputy director for regulatory affairs, a position he has held since August 2004. He previ- ously served as acting chief counsel and deputy chief counsel, FDA. Prior to that time, he was a shareholder with Heller Ehrman, a large international law firm; counsel and then partner with Fenwick & West, a law firm that focuses on technology and science; and, for various periods, assistant and then associate chief counsel for enforcement, medical devices, and veteri- nary medicine, FDA. Mr. Landa holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbia College; a J.D. degree from the University of Virginia; and a Master of

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88 LEGAL STRATEGIES IN CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION Laws degree from New York University, where he was a Food and Drug Law Institute fellow. Joan Rector McGlockton, J.D., is vice president of industry affairs and food policy at the National Restaurant Association. In this position, she leads the association’s food regulatory policy efforts. Ms. McGlockton has had extensive experience in working with food service and hospitality issues, representing restaurants, contract food management companies, and lodging companies. She came to the association from Sodexo, Inc., where she was senior vice president of corporate affairs and led the com- pany’s Corporate and Social Responsibility Department, which focused on health, wellness, and sustainability initiatives. Ms. McGlockton joined Sodexo following a long term at Marriott Corporation, where she served as assistant general counsel and corporate secretary. She has had extensive experience in building strategic alliances and coalitions, as well as managing regulatory matters. Ms. McGlockton has served on several not-for-profit boards, including that of the American Dietetic Association Foundation. She remains on the board of the Sodexo Foundation and serves on the board of the Maya Angelou Public Charter School in Washington, DC. Ms. McGlockton received her bachelor’s degree from Duke University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Sara Benjamin Neelon, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., is assistant professor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Duke University Medi- cal Center and the Duke Global Health Institute. Prior to joining Duke, Dr. Benjamin Neelon was a postdoctoral research fellow for the Obesity Prevention Program in the Department of Population Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on nutrition and physical activity interventions for children from birth to age 5, the nutrition and physical activity environment in child care settings, early childhood predictors of obesity, feeding practices as predictors of later obesity, and nutrition policy and regulation in child care. Dr. Benjamin Neelon has published a book on nutrition for children in child care: Making Food Healthy and Safe for Children: How to Meet the National Health and Safety Performance Standards—Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs and Nutri- tion and Physical Activity in Child Care. She is currently serving on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Obesity Prevention Policies for Young Children. Dr. Benjamin Neelon received both her M.P.H. and Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Russell R. Pate, Ph.D., is professor of exercise science at the Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia. His research interests and expertise focus on physical activity measure-

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89 APPENDIX B ment, determinants, and promotion in children and youth. He also directs a national postgraduate course aimed at developing research competencies related to physical activity and public health. Dr. Pate is involved with the CDC-funded Prevention Research Center at the University of South Carolina. His research includes studies on preschoolers’ physical activity levels and how schools can influence these levels, as well as multicenter trials on the promotion of physical activity among middle and high school–age girls. Dr. Pate was a member of the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee and served on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. He is a past president of both the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Coalition on Promoting Physical Activity. Dr. Pate served as a member of the IOM Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth and Committee on Progress in Preventing Obesity in Children and Youth, and is a current member of the Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Preven- tion and the Committee on Obesity Prevention Policies for Young Children. He received a B.S. in physical education from Springfield College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in exercise physiology from the University of Oregon. Jennifer L. Pomeranz, J.D., M.P.H., is director of legal initiatives at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University. At the Rudd Center, Ms. Pomeranz develops meaningful legal solutions to public health issues related to food and obesity policy. She speaks and publishes on the subjects of food marketing to children, the First Amendment, menu labeling, regulation of the retail environment, and how health departments and attorneys general can address public health issues such as obesity. Ms. Pomeranz earned her J.D. from Cornell Law School, practiced law for 5 years, and then attended the Harvard School of Public Health to earn her M.P.H. Lisa Powell, Ph.D., is senior research scientist in the Institute for Health Research and Policy and research professor in the Department of Eco- nomics at the University of Illinois, Chicago. She has extensive experience as an applied microeconomist in the empirical analysis of the effects of public policy on a series of behavioral outcomes. As principal investiga- tor on a number of NIH-funded projects and as a member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation–funded ImpacTeen research team, she focuses much of her current research on assessing the importance of economic and environmental factors (such as food prices and taxes; access to food stores, eating places, and facilities for physical activity; and television food advertising exposure) in food consumption and physical activity behaviors and as determinants of body mass index and the prevalence of obesity. Dr. Powell’s research also examines school-level food and fitness policies and the association between school meal participation

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90 LEGAL STRATEGIES IN CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION and children’s weight status. In addition, her research has examined the importance of peer and parental influences in teen smoking, as well as the role of prices and public policies in alcohol use among college students and educational and violence-related outcomes. Dr. Powell is an associ- ate editor of BMC Public Health and serves on a number of national and international advisory committees. Joseph Price, J.D., is senior partner in the General Litigation Group at Faegre & Benson in Minneapolis. His experience includes litigation involv- ing intrauterine devices, mammary implants, orthopedic prostheses, uro- logic implants, cardiovascular devices, a wide variety of prescription and over-the-counter drugs, and various chemicals. Mr. Price is also a recog- nized expert in the area of obesity/fast food litigation and has vast experi- ence in trial/jury consulting and psychology. Additionally, he has acted as an active defense counsel in cases related to diet drugs and herbal supplements. He also served as national counsel for a major Fortune 500 company in several toxic tort cases. From more than 1,000 nominations, Mr. Price was selected this year by PL Law 360 as one of the ten most admired product liability lawyers in the United States. Also this year, Faegre & Benson’s product liability practice received recognition by Chambers USA as one of the leading product liability and mass tort practices in America. Mr. Price was singled out by Chambers as one of the leading individuals nationwide in the areas of product liability and mass torts. He has been with Faegre & Benson since he graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1972. Barbara O. Schneeman, Ph.D., is director of the Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, FDA. In this position, she oversees the development of policy and regulations for dietary supplements, nutrition labeling and food stan- dards, infant formula, and medical foods and serves as U.S. delegate to two Codex committees. Previously, she was professor of nutrition at the University of California, Davis, and served in several administrative roles, including chair of the Department of Nutrition and dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Dr. Schneeman has been a visit- ing scientist at the University of California, San Francisco, and assistant administrator for nutrition in the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Her professional activities include par- ticipation in Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committees; the IOM Food and Nutrition Board; and committees for the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and for the state of California, USDA, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the World Health Organization, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Institute of Food Technologists.

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91 APPENDIX B Dr. Schneeman has been associate editor for the Journal of Nutrition and served on the editorial boards of Proceedings of the Society for Experi- mental Biology and Medicine, the Food and Nutrition Series of Academic Press, Nutrition Reviews, the Journal of Nutrition, the Journal of Food Sci- ence, and California Agriculture. Her professional honors include fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Carl Fellers Award from the Institute of Food Technology, the FDA Commissioner’s Special Citation, the Harvey W. Wiley Medal, the Samuel Cate Prescott Award for research, the Future Leader Award, and several honorary lec- tureships. Dr. Schneeman received a B.S. degree from the University of California, Davis; a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley; and postdoctoral training in gastrointestinal physiology at Children’s Hospital in Oakland, California. William H. Sorrell, J.D., is attorney general for the State of Vermont. He is a native and resident of Burlington, Vermont. He previously served as Chittenden County deputy state’s attorney and Chittenden County state’s attorney; engaged in private law practice at McNeil, Murray & Sorrell; and served as Vermont’s secretary of administration. As state’s attorney, he successfully prosecuted several significant matters, including the first case allowing the admissibility of DNA evidence in a Vermont state court and a 10-year-old homicide case in which the victim’s body had never been found. In May 1997, Governor Howard Dean appointed General Sorrell to fill the unexpired term of former attorney general Jeff Amestoy, who had been named Vermont’s chief justice. He was reelected to full terms in November 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008. He served as presi- dent of the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) from June 2004 to June 2005. Prior to his presidential year, General Sorrell served as chair of the NAAG’s Tobacco Committee and co-chair of its Consumer Protection Committee. In June 2003 he was chosen by his fellow attorneys general to receive NAAG’s prestigious Kelley-Wyman Award, given annu- ally to the “Outstanding Attorney General” who has done the most to further the goals of the nation’s attorneys general. In 2008 the American Legacy Foundation endowed in his name an annual lecture on tobacco issues. In October 2009, at its 196th annual meeting, the Vermont Medical Society recognized General Sorrell as its “Citizen of the Year” for 2009. He has served as chair of the NAAG Mission Foundation Board, as chair of the board of the American Legacy Foundation, on Vermont’s Judicial Nominating Board, as president of United Cerebral Palsy of Vermont, as secretary of the Vermont Coalition of the Handicapped, and on the board of the Winooski Valley Park District. General Sorrell graduated from the University of Notre Dame and Cornell Law School.

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92 LEGAL STRATEGIES IN CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION Mary T. Story, Ph.D., R.D., is professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health in the School of Public Health, University of Min- nesota, Minneapolis. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Story holds her Ph.D. in nutrition, and her interests are in the areas of child and adolescent nutrition, obesity prevention, and environmental and policy approaches to improve healthy eating. Her research focuses on the multiple factors related to eating behaviors of youth and on environmental, com- munity, and school-based interventions for obesity prevention and healthy eating. Dr. Story has authored more than 300 journal articles and other publications in the area of child and adolescent nutrition and obesity. She is director of the National Program Office for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Eating Research program. She is currently on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, the Journal of Adolescent Health, and Nutrition Today. Dr. Story has received several awards for her work. She was a member of the IOM Committee on Food Marketing to Children and Youth and the Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools, and is a current member of the IOM Stand- ing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. She is also a member of the IOM. Stephen D. Sugarman, J.D., is Roger J. Traynor professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. He joined the faculty in 1972. Previously, he served as acting director of the New York State Com- mission on the Cost, Quality and Financing of Education. Between 1967 and 1972, he was associated with the Los Angeles office of O’Melveny & Myers. At Berkeley, he served as associate dean from 1980 to 1982 and again from 2004 to 2005. He was director of the Earl Warren Legal Institute’s Family Law Program from 1988 to 1999. He regularly teaches courses on torts and occasionally courses on sports law, educational policy and law, and other subjects in the social justice curriculum. Mr. Sugarman’s books include Torts Stories; All Our Families; Regulating Tobacco; School Choice and Social Controversy; Smoking Policy: Law, Politics and Culture; and In the Interest of Children. He has been a visiting professor at the London School of Economics; University College, London; the University of Paris; the European University Institute, Florence; Kobe University Faculty of Law; Kyoto University Faculty of Law; and Columbia University School of Law. Mr. Sugarman is a senior consultant to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and an advisory board chair for the National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity. He received his J.D. and B.S. from Northwestern University.

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93 APPENDIX B Stephen Teret, J.D., M.P.H., is professor and associate dean in the Depart- ment of Health and Policy Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he also serves as director of the Center for Law and the Public’s Health. He has held appointments at the George Washington University School of Law, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a law firm in New York State. Mr. Teret’s research focuses on the use of law as a tool in protecting the public’s health, specifically in the areas of firearms, alcohol, and recently nutrition and obesity. He has also published on the role of law in injury prevention, immunization, and bioterrorism. In 1995, Mr. Teret founded the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, which focuses on informing firearms policy from a public health point of view. Recently, he has begun to focus his research on obesity, having published on self-regulation in the food industry and recommending standards that should be met for such regulation to be effective. He also has lectured on legal strategies that can be used in pre- venting obesity. His work, especially on preventing firearm injuries, earned him numerous awards, including the Distinguished Career Award from the American Public Health Association and the National Angel of Peace Award, granted by the Violence Prevention Coalition of Greater Los Ange- les. Mr. Teret received his J.D. from Brooklyn Law School and his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Joseph W. Thompson M.D., M.P.H., is surgeon general of the State of Arkansas, director of the Arkansas Center for Health Improvement, pro- fessor in the Colleges of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and director of the Robert Wood John- son Foundation Center to Prevent Childhood Obesity. He has led efforts in the planning and implementation of health care financing reform and in tobacco- and obesity-related health promotion and disease prevention programs in Arkansas, including documenting the state’s success in halt- ing the progress of the childhood obesity epidemic. He helped implement ARHealthNet, Arkansas’s health insurance waiver for low-income workers. Dr. Thompson served as Robert Wood Johnson Foundation clinical scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Luther Terry fellow in preventive medicine in the office of the assistant secretary for health in HHS, and assistant vice president and director of research at the National Committee for Quality Assurance in Washington, DC. In 1997, he served as the first child and adolescent health scholar of the U.S. Agency for Health- care Research and Quality (then the U.S. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research) before returning to Arkansas. Dr. Thompson earned his medical degree from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is a current member of the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention.

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94 LEGAL STRATEGIES IN CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION David C. Vladeck, J.D., is director of the Federal Trade Commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, which works to protect consumers from unfair, deceptive, or fraudulent practices. The bureau conducts investiga- tions, sues companies and individuals that violate the law, promulgates rules to protect consumers, and educates consumers and businesses about their rights and responsibilities. The bureau also collects complaints regard- ing consumer fraud and identity theft and makes them available to law enforcement agencies across the country. Mr. Vladeck is on leave from Georgetown University Law Center, where he is professor of law. Before joining the Georgetown faculty, he spent more than 25 years with the Pub- lic Citizen Litigation Group, handling complex litigation. He has argued a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and more than 60 cases before federal courts of appeal and state courts of last resort. Mr. Vladeck testifies frequently before Congress and writes on issues related to adminis- trative law, preemption, the First Amendment, and access to justice. In May 2008, Legal Times of Washington recognized him as one of 30 “champions of justice” and one of the 90 greatest lawyers in Washington, DC, over the past 30 years. Mr. Vladeck is a graduate of New York University and Columbia Law School.