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Study Committee Biographical Information Joseph L. Schofer, Chair, is professor of civil and environmental engi- neering, associate dean of the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University, and director of North- western’s Infrastructure Technology Institute. He chaired the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering from 1997 to 2002 and was director of research and interim director of the Transportation Center for various periods until 2008. Dr. Schofer’s research interests focus on planning and management of transportation systems, particularly the provision and use of data and information for effective decision making and evaluation of systems, plans, and projects. His current research includes development of measures of highway operational performance under disruptions, sustainability of transportation systems, decision support for infrastructure preservation and rehabilitation, and transportation policy. Through the Transportation Research Board (TRB), Dr. Schofer is actively engaged in the planning and implementation of conferences and workshops focused on data and information resources for transportation planning and management. He is a member of the Strategic Highway Research Program 2 Technical Coordinating Committee for Capacity Research, and he serves on several TRB standing committees and cooperative research program project panels. He chaired the National Research Council (NRC) Committee to Review the Bureau of Transportation Statistics’ Survey Programs, which produced the report Measuring Personal Travel and Goods Movement. Dr. Schofer is a member of the Capital Advisory Board for the Chicago Transit Authority, the Mayor’s Pedestrian Advisory Committee   161 

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162  How We Travel: A Sustainable National Program for Travel Data (Chicago), the Transportation Committee of the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, the Citizen’s Advisory Board of Pace (the suburban Chicago bus service provider), and other advisory boards. He earned a B.E. degree from Yale University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from North- western University, all in civil engineering. Joseph G. B. Bryan joined Halcrow in 2008 as vice president of the Economics and Business Solutions group. He leads Halcrow’s freight transportation and logistics practice in North America and heads the company’s office in Boston. Before coming to Halcrow, he served as manag- ing director of the Trade and Transportation practice at Global Insight and was president of Reebie Associates until Global Insight acquired the firm in 2005. Mr. Bryan has 30 years of experience in freight carrier man- agement in multiple modes, associated with truckload, less-than-truckload, air, and rail freight companies, and has held senior positions in marketing and operations. He assists private- and public-sector clientele in strategy development, policy and operations analysis, and market assessment, working at the urban, corridor, and national levels. Mr. Bryan was co– principal investigator for the National Cooperative Highway Research Program’s 2006 Report 586: Rail Freight Solutions to Roadway Congestion. At Reebie Associates, he directed the creation of the TRANSEARCH county-to-county database, the first countrywide database of freight traffic flows in that form, and was his firm’s lead member for the fed- eral Freight Analysis Framework study, a seminal effort in national freight planning. Mr. Bryan serves as chair of the TRB Urban Freight Committee and is a member of two other TRB standing committees—the Committee on Freight Planning and Logistics and the Freight Systems Group. He holds a B.A. from Princeton University and an MBA from the Tuck School at Dartmouth College. Anne P. Canby is president of the Surface Transportation Policy Partner- ship, a national advocacy coalition for transportation reform. She served as Delaware’s transportation secretary from 1993 to 2001 and is recog- nized nationally both as a progressive leader in the transportation field for transforming a traditional highway agency into a multimodal mobility provider and as an advocate for integrating land use and transportation planning. Prior to serving in this post, Ms. Canby led a consulting practice focused on institutional and management issues, with particular emphasis on implementation of federal surface transportation legislation enacted in

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Study Committee Biographical Information  163  1991. She has served as commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Transportation, treasurer of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Au- thority, and deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Trans- portation. Ms. Canby is a past member of the TRB Executive Committee, a board member of the Mineta Transportation Institute, and a member of the Women’s Transportation Seminar (WTS). She has been recognized for her leadership by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), the Association of Metropolitan Planning Organizations, the Delaware Chapter of the American Planning Association, and WTS. Ms. Canby received the 2006 Carey Distinguished Service Award for outstanding leadership and service to transportation research and to TRB. She has twice received the Woman of the Year Award from WTS. She holds a B.A. from Wheaton College. Anand Desai is professor and chair of doctoral studies in the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at The Ohio State University. He also holds a courtesy appointment in the Management Science Department of the Fisher College of Business and is a faculty member of the Environmental Science Graduate Program. Dr. Desai’s research interests include mea- surement of performance and evaluation of the provision of public services. He has worked on methods for measuring effectiveness and efficiency in the public sector and the use of statistical, operations research, and computational models for public policy analysis. Dr. Desai is on the editorial board of several journals, including the International Journal of Society Systems Science and the International Journal of Sustainable Society. He is on the Board of Directors of the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management and a member of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences. Dr. Desai holds a B.S. from the University of Delhi, India, and the University of Leicester, U.K., and an M.S. in operations research and a Ph.D. in public policy analysis from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Mortimer L. Downey III is senior advisor to Parsons Brinckerhoff, where he previously served as chairman of PB Consult and as a principal consultant. Before that, he served as deputy secretary of the U.S. Depart- ment of Transportation from 1993 to 2001 and for 12 years before that as executive director and chief financial officer of the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Earlier in his career, he was on the staff of the Committee on the Budget of the U.S. House of Representatives and

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164  How We Travel: A Sustainable National Program for Travel Data worked for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Mr. Downey is a member of the Board of Directors of the Eno Foundation and of the Industry Leaders Council of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was elected to the National Academy of Public Administration, where he served as chairman of the Board of Directors. Mr. Downey was a member of the TRB Committee for the Study of Funding Options for Freight Transportation Projects of National Significance. He has received the Frank Turner Lifetime Achievement Award from TRB and lifetime achievement awards from APTA and the Council of University Transportation Centers, among others. Mr. Downey received a master’s degree in public adminis- tration from New York University and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Yale University. Lance R. Grenzeback is senior vice president at Cambridge Systematics, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in transportation policy, planning, and economics. He has served as program manager for many major consulting studies that have provided policy, program, and technical support to federal, state, and local governments and international clients. His primary areas of interest include freight planning and intermodal policy, transportation operations, intelligent transportation systems (ITS), and economics. Mr. Grenzeback is currently a member of the TRB Committee for a Study of Potential Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reductions from Transportation. He is also a former member of two TRB standing committees—the Urban Freight Transportation Committee and the Regional Transportation Systems Management and Operations Committee—and served as a member of the TRB Committee for a Future Strategy for Transportation Information Management. Mr. Grenzeback is a charter member of ITS America. He holds a bachelor’s degree in government and a master’s degree in city planning and economics, both from Harvard University. Hermann Habermann is a consultant on the modernization of national statistical systems. In this capacity, he has worked for the United Nations, The World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund, as well as private- sector consulting organizations. He also works part time for the NRC Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He is former deputy director and chief operating officer of the U.S. Census Bureau, director of the United Nations Statistics Division, and chief statistician and deputy director for budget at the Office of Management and Budget.

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Study Committee Biographical Information 165 Dr. Habermann is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the National Academy of Public Administration and a past member of the NRC Committee on National Statistics. He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Timothy A. Henkel is an assistant commissioner with the Minnesota Department of Transportation and directs the Modal Planning and Program Management Division at the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT). In his current position, he manages the Offices of Passenger Rail, Investment Management, Freight and Commercial Vehicle Operations, Transit, Aeronautics, and Transportation Data and Analysis. Mr. Henkel’s 28-year transportation career includes working with local government and the private sector. At MnDOT he has worked in the areas of plan- ning, program management, and highway and rail project development. Mr. Henkel is currently a member of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials’ (AASHTO) Standing Committee on Planning. He received a B.S. from Bemidji State University and a cer- tificate in civil engineering and land surveying from Dunwoody College. Charles E. Howard, Jr., is transportation planning director for the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC), a position he has held since February 2005. Prior to joining PSRC, Mr. Howard worked with the Washington State Department of Transportation for 18 years, most recently as director of strategic planning and programming. Before that, he served as a planner for the Federal Highway Administration, with posts in Juneau; Boston; Washington, D.C.; and Olympia, Washington. He has been involved in state and regional transportation issues for the past 28 years, and he played an active role in developing and implementing the State of Washington’s growth management act. Mr. Howard is outgoing Policy Committee chair for the Association of Metropolitan Planning Organizations and a current Policy Committee member. He is also section leader of the TRB Transpor- tation System Policy, Planning, and Process Section and is a member of the Washington State Commute Trip Reduction Board. Mr. Howard is a graduate of the Ohio State University and holds a master’s degree in city and regional planning from Harvard University. James M. Lepkowski is a research professor at the Institute for Social Research and professor in the Department of Biostatistics, both at the University of Michigan, as well as a research professor at the Joint Program

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166  How We Travel: A Sustainable National Program for Travel Data in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. He is a survey methodologist specializing in sampling and survey analysis, developing new survey sampling methods and applying them to diverse problems. Dr. Lepkowski’s current research focuses on telephone sampling methods, methods to compensate for missing survey data, and methods for analyzing survey data taking into account the complexity of the survey sample design. He has served on a variety of national and international advisory committees on survey research methods for such organizations as the National Academy of Sciences, the National Center for Health Statistics, the Food and Drug Administration, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the World Health Organization. Dr. Lepkowski has been a member of two NRC committees dealing with transportation data—the Committee to Review the Bureau of Transportation Statistics’ Survey Programs and the Panel on Bureau of Transportation Statistics International Trade Traffic. He holds a B.S. in mathematics from Illinois State University and an M.P.H. and Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. Daniel C. Murray is vice president of research for the American Trans- portation Research Institute (ATRI), where he is responsible for developing and directing ATRI’s portfolio of trucking- and transportation-related research and training initiatives. He previously served as director of technology research and senior policy analyst for ATRI and its predecessor, the American Trucking Associations (ATA) Foundation. Among his data-related projects is a current joint effort with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to collect travel performance data on major freight corridors from truck-equipped automatic vehicle location equipment. Prior to joining the ATA Foundation, Mr. Murray worked for the Minneapolis- St. Paul Regional Transit Board as project administrator in public policy, legislative programs, and contract management. He also spent several years working in economic development for the Chicago Civic Committee, a Fortune 100 business consortium. Mr. Murray has represented industry research interests on several transportation-related boards, including the Minneapolis–St. Paul metropolitan planning organization, the Midwest Transportation Alliance, and the Transportation Policy Institute. He cur- rently chairs the National Cooperative Freight Research Program Project Panel on Strategies for Measuring the Costs of Freight Transportation and is a member of the TRB Research and Technology Coordinating Committee (FHWA) and two TRB standing research committees on Intermodal Freight Transport and Trucking Industry Research. Mr. Murray

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Study Committee Biographical Information  167  holds a B.A. from Gustavus Adolphus College and an M.S. from North- western University. Alan E. Pisarski is a consultant in private practice. His specialties include travel behavior and statistics, transportation policy, and tourism. Over the past 30 years, he has participated in all of the major policy planning efforts by the U.S. Department of Transportation. He has also served on the United Nations (UN) Group of Experts on Transport Statistics and, more recently, supported the UN World Tourism Organization in assessing and expanding national travel statistical measurement. Mr. Pisarski previously chaired the TRB Committee on National Transportation Data Requirements, and was the first chair of the TRB Data Section, with cognizance over all of TRB’s statistical activities. He has chaired or cochaired a number of other TRB committees, including a Steering Committee for the Conference on Information Needs to Support State and Local Transportation Decision Making into the 21st Century. He also chaired a recent joint task force of TRB, FHWA, and AASHTO that examined long-term transportation policy research needs. In 1999 he was invited to deliver the Distinguished Lecture at TRB, which was based on the linkages among transportation policy, planning, and data. In 2007 he received TRB’s lifetime achievement award for his career work in research. Mr. Pisarski holds a B.A. in sociology and economics from the City University of New York. Steven E. Polzin is director of mobility policy research at the Center for Urban Transportation Research at the University of South Florida. Dr. Polzin directs and carries out research in mobility analysis, public transportation, travel behavior, and transportation policy for clients at the local, state, and federal levels. He coordinates the center’s involvement in the university’s educational program and teaches graduate courses as an adjunct faculty member. He is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Public Transportation and Transportation and serves on several committees of TRB and APTA. He serves on the board of directors of the Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority (Tampa, Florida) and has served with the Hillsborough County metropolitan planning organization. He worked for transit agencies in Chicago (Regional Transit Authority), Cleveland (Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority), and Dallas (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) before joining the University of South Florida in 1988. Dr. Polzin is a civil engineer with a BSCE from the University of Wisconsin– Madison and a master’s and Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

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168  How We Travel: A Sustainable National Program for Travel Data Johanna P. Zmud is a senior policy researcher at the RAND Corporation in the Transportation, Space, and Technology Program. Prior to joining Rand, she served as founding owner and president of NuStats, a U.S.- based survey science consultancy specializing in complex and large-scale transportation research studies. Dr. Zmud has 25 years of experience in survey research design, implementation, and statistical analysis. She has directed more than 30 household travel surveys and 100 other surveys, including surveys on freight issues, tolling and road pricing, and bicycle and pedestrian mobility. She has published papers on a variety of survey- related topics, including research among non-English-speaking popula- tions, mitigation of survey nonresponse, application of new technologies, and travel survey instrument design. Dr. Zmud credits her long history of active engagement in TRB activities for her continued focus on emerging needs for and sources of both passenger and freight data. She serves as incoming chair of the Technical Activities Council’s Policy and Organiza- tion Group, having previously chaired its Data and Information Systems Section and its Travel Survey Methods Committee. She is cochair of the International Steering Committee for Travel Survey Conferences and co- editor of Transport Survey Methods: Keeping Up With a Changing World (Emerald, 2010). Dr. Zmud is a current member of the NRC Committee on Equity Implications of Alternative Finance Mechanisms. From 2003 to 2006, she served as a founding director of the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority, an independent government agency created to imple- ment innovative, multimodal transportation solutions. Dr. Zmud earned a B.S. from East Carolina University, an M.S. from the University of Maryland, and a Ph.D. in communication research from the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication.