Appendix F

Biographical Sketches of
Committee Members and Staff

Kenneth H. Reckhow, Chair, is chief scientist in Global Climate Change and Environmental Sciences at RTI International and professor emeritus of water resources in the Nicholas School Faculty division of Environmental Sciences and Policy at Duke University. Dr. Reckhow’s research activities have concerned the development, evaluation, and application of models and other assessment techniques for the management of water quality. Recent work by Dr. Reckhow’s group has focused on the assessment of nonpoint source pollution on surface water quality and the development of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). He has served on many National Research Council (NRC) committees, including as chair of the Committee to Assess the Scientific Basis of the Total Maximum Daily Load Approach to Water Pollution Reduction and as a member of the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. He received a B.S. in engineering physics from Cornell University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from Harvard University.

Patricia E. Norris, Vice Chair, is the Gordon and Norma Guyer and Gary L. Seevers Chair in Natural Resource Conservation at Michigan State University. Her professional interests focus on the economics of natural resource conservation, incentive-based natural resource conservation and environmental policy, and conservation education. She has conducted research and developed outreach programs addressing issues in soil conservation, water quality, groundwater management, wetland policy, land markets, land-use conflicts, and farmland preservation. In her extension work, she has focused largely upon natural resource policy issues, working with private resource



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Appendix F Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Kenneth H. Reckhow, Chair, is chief scientist in Global Climate Change and Environmental Sciences at RTI International and professor emeritus of water resources in the Nicholas School Faculty division of Environmental Sciences and Policy at Duke University. Dr. Reckhow’s research activities have concerned the development, evaluation, and application of models and other assessment techniques for the management of water quality. Recent work by Dr. Reckhow’s group has focused on the assessment of nonpoint source pollution on surface water quality and the development of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). He has served on many National Research Council (NRC) committees, including as chair of the Committee to Assess the Scientific Basis of the Total Maximum Daily Load Approach to Water Pollution Reduction and as a member of the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. He received a B.S. in engineering physics from Cornell University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from Harvard University. Patricia E. Norris, Vice Chair, is the Gordon and Norma Guyer and Gary L. Seevers Chair in Natural Resource Conservation at Michigan State Univer- sity. Her professional interests focus on the economics of natural resource conservation, incentive-based natural resource conservation and environ- mental policy, and conservation education. She has conducted research and developed outreach programs addressing issues in soil conservation, water quality, groundwater management, wetland policy, land markets, land-use conflicts, and farmland preservation. In her extension work, she has focused largely upon natural resource policy issues, working with private resource 243

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244 NUTRIENT AND SEDIMENT REDUCTION GOALS IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY owners, local governments, and state and federal agencies as they address the needs for and impacts of institutional change. Dr. Norris teaches courses in public policy analysis and natural resource and environmental econom- ics. She received a B.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Georgia and M.S. and Ph.D., both in Agricultural Economics, from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Richard J. Budell is the director of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Office of Agricultural Water Policy. In this position he is responsible for the management of statewide programs to ensure that the water quality goals and water quantity needs of Florida’s agricultural industry are achieved. This includes the development and implementation of regional programs to encourage agricultural producers to adopt vol- untary, incentive-based management practices designed to address water quality concerns, and the development and implementation of programs to address agriculture’s nonpoint source impacts on water bodies targeted for the establishment of TMDLs under the federal Clean Water Act. Mr. Budell received a B.S. from Boise State University and an M.S. from Florida State University. Dominic M. Di Toro (NAE) is the Edward C. Davis Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Delaware. He has specialized in the devel- opment and application of mathematical and statistical models to stream, lake, estuarine, and coastal water and sediment quality problems. Recently his work has focused on the development of water and sediment quality criteria for the U.S. Environmental Agency (EPA), sediment flux models for nutrients and metals, and integrated hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality models. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and served on the NRC Committee on Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites. He received a B.E.E. in electrical engineering from Manhattan College, an M.A. in electrical engineering from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. in civil and geological engineering from Princeton University. James N. Galloway is associate dean for the sciences and Sidman P. Poole Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. His research interests include the chemistry of natural waters, anthropogenic alterations of biogeochemical cycles, and atmospheric chemistry. Current activities include research on the acidification of streams in Shenandoah National Park, the composition of precipitation in remote regions, air-sea interactions, and the impact of Asia on global biogeochemistry. Dr. Gal- loway has received numerous honors and awards, including the 2008 Tyler

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245 APPENDIX F Prize for Environmental Achievement for his work demonstrating the per- vasive and persistent effects of reactive nitrogen on Earth’s environment. He has served on many NRC committees, most recently the Subcommittee on Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations. He received a B.A. from Whittier College and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego. Holly Greening is director of the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP). Ms. Greening oversees a unique federal, state, and local partnership dedicated to the preservation and restoration of Florida’s largest open-water estuary. She manages TBEP’s varied technical and public outreach efforts, and she serves as the chief liaison between the program and the elected officials, scientists, regulators, and citizens that serve on its various committees. Ms. Greening’s professional career has focused on implementation and man- agement of freshwater and estuarine projects for state, federal, and private entities. She has served on the Governing Board of the Estuarine Research Federation and three recent NRC committees on coastal issues, including the Committee on Causes and Management of Coastal Eutrophication, and she is a member of the Ocean Studies Board. She received an M.S. in marine ecology from Florida State University. Andrew N. Sharpley is professor of soils and water quality in the Depart- ment of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences at the University of Arkan- sas. His research investigates the cycling of phosphorus in soil-plant-water systems in relation to agricultural production systems and water quality and includes the management of animal manures, fertilizers, and crop residues. He evaluates the role of stream and river sediments in modifying the amounts and forms of phosphorus transported to lakes and reservoirs in Arkansas. He has previous experience with the NRC, having served on the Committee on Causes and Management of Coastal Eutrophication. He received a B.Sc. in soil science and biogeochemistry from the University of North Wales and a Ph.D. in soil science from Massey University. Adel Shirmohammadi is associate dean for research in the College of Agri- culture and Natural Resources and associate director of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of Maryland. His research interests include modeling as a tool to predict movement of pesticides and nutrients from watersheds in response to hydrological events, ground water pollution, and how to prevent nutrient movement into the ground and surface water systems. Dr. Shirmohammadi uses field and watershed scale monitoring to develop and to validate mathematical models for identifying best management practices. His research also involves interfacing nonpoint source pollution models with geographic information systems (GIS) for pol-

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246 NUTRIENT AND SEDIMENT REDUCTION GOALS IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY lution identification. He received a B.S. in agricultural engineering from the University of Rezaeiyeh, Iran, an M.S. in agricultural engineering from the University of Nebraska, and a Ph.D. in biological and agricultural engineer- ing from North Carolina State University. Paul E. Stacey is research coordinator for the Great Bay National Estua- rine Research Reserve. He was formerly the director of the Planning and Standards Division in the Connecticut Department of Environmental Pro- tection’s Bureau of Water Management, where he oversaw agency par- ticipation in the Long Island Sound Study (LISS) and Long Island Sound (LIS) management programs and the state’s nonpoint Source Program. As a principal state water quality analyst and manager focusing on cultural eutrophication, Mr. Stacey is well versed in the study of reactive nitro- gen sources; air, watershed, and coastal nitrogen dynamics; environmental effects; and management. He is also an expert on programs and policies related to nitrogen control in an integrated protocol because of Connecti- cut’s implementation of the most extensive nitrogen-trading program in the country. Mr. Stacey received a B.A. in psychology from the College of the Holy Cross, a B.S. in wildlife and fisheries from Utah State University, and an M.S. in fisheries biology from Colorado State University. STAFF Stephanie E. Johnson, study director, is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 2002, she has served as study director for ten studies, including congressionally man- dated reviews of Everglades restoration progress. She has also worked on NRC studies on desalination, water reuse, contaminant source remediation, the disposal of coal combustion wastes, and water security. Dr. Johnson received a B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia. Michael J. Stoever is a research associate with the Water Science and Tech- nology Board. He has worked on a number of studies including Desalina- tion: A National Perspective, the Water Implications of Biofuels Production in the United States, and the Committee on Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration. He has also worked on NRC studies on Everglades res- toration, the effect of water withdrawals on the St. Johns River, and the WATERS Science Network. Mr. Stoever received a B.A. in political science from The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey in Pomona, New Jersey.