D

Forum Member
Biographical Sketches

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N. (Co-chair), is the Anna D. Wolf Chair in Nursing at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Dr. Campbell’s research addresses the risk factors for and the evaluation of interventions to prevent domestic violence. She has authored numerous articles on intimate partner violence, violence against women, and adolescent exposure to violence. Dr. Campbell has served on the National Institute of Mental Health Violence and Traumatic Stress Study Section and is a member of the American Academy of Nursing and the Institute of Medicine. She has been selected as the Simon Visiting Scholar at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom and, most recently, the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nursing Foundation Scholar in Residence. Dr. Campbell has been active in the Institute of Medicine as a member of the Board on Global Health and has served as a member of two committees of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families.

Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P. (Co-chair), is executive director of the Task Force for Global Health. Previously, for 20 years, Dr. Rosenberg was at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he led its work in violence prevention and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of the special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s



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D Forum Member Biographical Sketches Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N. (Co-chair), is the Anna D. Wolf Chair in Nursing at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Dr. Campbell’s re- search addresses the risk factors for and the evaluation of interventions to prevent domestic violence. She has authored numerous articles on inti- mate partner violence, violence against women, and adolescent exposure to violence. Dr. Campbell has served on the National Institute of Mental Health Violence and Traumatic Stress Study Section and is a member of the American Academy of Nursing and the Institute of Medicine. She has been selected as the Simon Visiting Scholar at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom and, most recently, the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nursing Foundation Scholar in Residence. Dr. Campbell has been active in the Institute of Medicine as a member of the Board on Global Health and has served as a member of two committees of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P. (Co-chair), is executive director of the Task Force for Global Health. Previously, for 20 years, Dr. Rosenberg was at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he led its work in violence prevention and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of the special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s 209

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210 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN research and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being, with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation, and health communications. He has au- thored more than 120 publications and recently co-authored the book Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed (University of California Press, 2010). Dr. Rosenberg has received numerous awards including the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Rosenberg’s organization, the Task Force for Global Health, participated in the IOM-sponsored workshop Violence Prevention in Low- and Middle Income Countries: Finding a Place on the Global Agenda, and the Task Force remains interested in helping to continue the momentum of the workshop through the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. The Task Force is heavily involved in the delivery of a number of global health programs and sees many ways that interpersonal violence and conflict exacerbate serious health problems and inequities. Clare Anderson, M.S.W., LICSW, is the deputy commissioner at the Ad- ministration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF). Prior to joining ACYF, she was senior associate at the Center for the Study of Social Policy, where she promoted better outcomes for children, youth, and families through community engagement and child welfare system transformation. Ms. Anderson provided technical assistance through a federally funded child welfare implementation center and to sites implementing community partnerships for protecting children and the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Family to Family Initiative. She also conducted monitoring of and provided support to jurisdictions under court order to improve child welfare systems. Ms. Anderson previously worked as a direct practice social worker as a member of the Freddie Mac Foundation Child and Adolescent Protection Center at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. She was a consultant to and clinical director at the Baptist Home for Children and Families (now the National Center for Children and Families) in Bethesda, MD, and a member of the clinical faculty at the Georgetown University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry’s Child and Adolescent Services. Frances E. Ashe-Goins, R.N., M.P.H., a registered nurse and policy analyst, is acting director of the Office of Women’s Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Formerly, as deputy director and director of the Division of Policy and Program Development, she was responsible for numerous women’s health issues, including HIV/AIDS, domestic vio- lence, rape/sexual assault, lupus, diabetes, organ/tissue donation, minority women’s health, international health, female genital cutting, mental health, homelessness, and young women’s health. Mrs. Ashe-Goines also coordi- nated the regional women’s health coordinators programs. She has written

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211 APPENDIX D numerous articles, appeared on radio and television programs, been fea- tured in magazine and newspaper articles, made presentations at national and international conferences and workshops, and received many awards and commendations. She is a featured author of a chapter on domestic violence in the book, Policy and Politics in Nursing and Health Care, 4th edition. Katrina Baum, Ph.D., is division director of the Violence and Victimiza- tion Research Division at the National Institute of Justice. Dr. Baum most recently was senior statistician at the Bureau of Justice Statistics, where she worked on the National Crime Victimization Survey. Her tenure there included research on juvenile victims, college students, school crime, and groundbreaking studies on identity theft and stalking. Her reports have been cited in the New York Times and other major newspapers, and she has appeared on a local television affiliate. Prior to joining the U.S. Department of Justice, Dr. Baum managed a variety of research projects in criminal jus- tice. While working at the Cartographic Modeling Lab in Philadelphia, she developed the Firearms Analysis System, which is a geographic information system used to track firearm-related injuries using data from the Philadel- phia Police Department and the National Tracing Center of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. She also served as the local evaluator for Weed & Seed and Safe Schools/Healthy Students grants. Susan Bissell, Ph.D., serves as chief of child protection of the Programme Division at UNICEF. She previously worked on issues concerning educa- tion and children in especially difficult circumstances with UNICEF Sri Lanka and UNICEF in Bangladesh, where she also focused on child labor. Dr. Bissell has managed a number of reports, including a 62-country study on the implementation of the general measures of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and global research on the Palermo Protocol and child trafficking. As member of the editorial board of the report of the UN Secretary General’s Study on Violence Against Children, which was released in 2006, she has also been involved in follow-up activities that will advance the implementation of the recommendations of the study. She has contributed to several articles on children’s rights, including “Promotion of Children’s Rights and Prevention of Child Maltreatment” (2009) and “Overview and Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child” (2006), both of which were published in The Lancet. Arturo Cervantes Trejo, M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H., serves as technical secre- tary of the National Council for Injury Prevention and general director of the National Center for Injury Prevention with the Mexican Ministry of Health. He also holds the Carlos Peralta Quintero Chair of Public Health

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212 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN at the Faculty of Medicine of Anahuac University in Mexico. He is board certified by the National Council of Public Health in Mexico and is a mem- ber of the charter class of the National Board of Public Health Examiners in the United States. As head of the National Center for Injury Prevention, Dr. Cervantes has co-authored the National Specific Action Program for Road Safety and the National Specific Action Program for Violence Prevention as well as numerous analyses of morbidity and mortality from external causes of injury. Currently, he participates in the presidential task force Todos Somos Juárez, which is developing a strategy for violence prevention and social development for the city of Ciudad Juárez Chihuahua. Todos Somos Juárez is led by the federal government with the participation of the govern- ment of the state of Chihuahua, the municipal government of Juárez, and the city’s civil society. The strategy includes 160 policy actions in health, la- bor, education, culture, economic, and security areas undertaken to address the underlying social and economic issues that fuel crime and insecurity in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico’s eighth largest city and the most populous city on the Mexico–United States border. XinQi Dong, M.D., M.P.H., is associate professor of medicine, behavioral sciences, and nursing at the Rush University Medical Center. Dr. Dong’s research is focused on the epidemiological studies of elder abuse and ne- glect, both in the United States and China, with particular emphasis on its adverse health outcomes across different racial/ethnic groups. Dr. Dong is a recipient of the Paul B. Beeson Scholar in Aging Award, and his work has been recognized by the American Geriatric Society, American Public Health Association, and the Institute of Medicine of Chicago. He was awarded the Nobuo Maeda International Aging and Public Health Research Award and the Central Society for Clinical Research Award. He was the first geriatri- cian to be the recipient of the national Physician Advocacy Merit Award by the Institute of Medicine as a Profession (IMAP). Through culturally and linguistically appropriate ways, Dr. Dong actively works with the Chinese communities to promote understanding and civic engagement on the issues of elder abuse and neglect. He currently serves on the board of directors for the Chinese American Service League, the largest social services organiza- tion in the Midwest serving the needs of Chinese population. Amie Gianino, M.S., is the representative of Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABI) to the Global Violence Prevention Forum. Ms. Gianino, the senior global director for the company’s Better World efforts, began her career with the company in 1989. Evidence suggests that cultural factors play a strong role in determining whether and how violence manifests in a country’s population. Individual factors, such as personality type, are also important predictors of violent behavior. Still, some posit that alcohol may be a cause

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213 APPENDIX D of violent behavior. As the world’s largest brewer— and as the beer industry leader in social responsibility—ABI is especially interested in the dialogue surrounding the intersection of alcohol and violence. The company believes that measures to change negative cultural norms relating to violence and other risky behaviors are important goals. To this end, ABI has been sup- porting social norms initiatives for more than 10 years in the United States and Europe, with plans for further work in China and Latin America. ABI has also supported the Alcohol Medical Scholars Program (AMSP) since 1997. The AMSP helps train physicians to teach others in the medical community how to better diagnose and treat alcohol dependency issues. In addition, ABI has supported domestic violence prevention initiatives. Kathy Greenlee, J.D., was appointed by President Obama as the fourth assistant secretary for aging at the Administration on Aging (AoA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and confirmed by the Senate in June 2009. Ms. Greenlee brings more than 10 years of experience advancing the health and independence of older persons and their families and advocating for the rights of older persons. AoA is mandated by the Older Americans Act (OAA) to be the focal point and lead advocacy agency for older persons and their concerns at the federal level. AoA’s vision for older people, embodied in the OAA, is based on the value that dignity is inherent to all individuals and the belief that older people should have the opportunity to fully participate in all aspects of society and community life; be able to maintain their health and independence; and be free from vio- lence, abuse, neglect, and exploitation. AoA works with its partners at the federal, state, and community levels to help strengthen the nation’s capacity to promote the dignity and independence of older people. AoA works to stimulate programmatic and policy activity at the national, state, and local levels in order to advance the work of eliminating violence against older adults and elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation in the United States as well as with international organizations and researchers around the world. By doing so, AoA seeks to address the social, economic, and health impacts of violence against older adults and elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Rodrigo V. Guerrero, M.D., Dr.P.H., serves as city counselor of Cali, Co- lombia. Previously, he has held the posts of professor, department head, dean of health sciences, and president at Universidad del Valle in Colombia, and he was mayor of Cali, Colombia. As mayor, Dr. Guerrero developed an epidemiological approach to urban violence prevention through the Program DESEPAZ, which has been successfully applied in several cities of Colombia and in other countries. After leaving the mayoral post, he joined the Pan American Health Organization in Washington, DC, where he started the Violence Prevention Program. Dr. Guerrero has written

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214 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN numerous articles on youth violence and violence as a health issue. In ad- dtion to his current post as city counselor, Dr. Guerrero dedicates his time to Vallenpaz, a nonprofit organization devoted to helping rural communi- ties in conflict-ridden areas of Colombia. He is a member of CISALVA, the Violence Research Center of Universidad del Valle, and the Institute of Medicine. John R. Hayes, M.D., is the global strategy leader for neuroscience medical affairs at Eli Lilly and Company. Before assuming his current position, Dr. Hayes served as vice president for Lilly Research Laboratories. Lilly has done extensive research into areas of suicidality and harmful behavior in the context of mental disorders and has provided significant support for independent research as well as professional and public education about these important and often controversial public health issues. Previously Dr. Hayes has held faculty positions at Texas A&M University and the Indiana University School of Medicine and was president of St. Vincent Hospitals and Health Systems and chief executive officer of Seton Health of Indiana. Dr. Hayes was chairman of the board of the Indiana Health Industry Forum and has served on the boards of 5 for-profit and 12 not-for-profit institu- tions. He has been president of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine and a director on the American Board of Family Medicine and of the Amer- ican Psychiatric Foundation, and he is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He has won national teaching awards, authored scientific publications, and served as visiting faculty at numerous medical institutions globally over the course of his career. David Hemenway, Ph.D., is an economist and professor at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and a James Marsh Visiting Professor-at-Large at the University of Vermont. Additionally, he is director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center and the Youth Violence Prevention Center. He was president of the Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research and in 2007 received the Excellence in Science award from the injury section of the American Public Health Association. He has received fellowships from the Pew, Soros, and Robert Wood Johnson foundations. Dr. Hemenway has written more than 150 journal articles and is sole author of five books. Recent books include Private Guns Public Health (University of Michigan Press, 2006) and While We Were Sleeping: Success Stories in Injury and Violence Prevention (University of California Press, 2009). Dr. Hemenway has received 10 HSPH teaching awards. Frances Henry, M.B.A., serves as advisor to the F Felix Foundation. Previ- ously, from 2005 to 2009, she created and directed Global Violence Preven- tion, a project that advanced the science-based prevention of violence in

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215 APPENDIX D low- and middle-income countries through a coalition of U.S. researchers and practitioners. Based on her experiences of childhood sexual abuse, she founded and for 13 years directed Stop It Now!, an organization dedicated to preventing the sexual abuse of children. She is author of Vaccines for Violence, a set of five essays exploring how she learned to counter violence by dealing with fear, by balancing accountability and compassion, and by increasing her capacity to connect to others. Ms. Henry’s previous work includes owning a management consulting company and directing presiden- tial and gubernatorial commissions for women. She served as staff for the U.S. Commission on International Women’s Year. Mercedes S. Hinton, Ph.D., is a program officer for the Initiative on Con- fronting Violent Crime at the Open Society Foundations (OSF), where she directs the program’s Central America work. Previously, she worked as a consultant for the World Bank’s conflict, crime, and violence team and served for seven years on the faculty of the London School of Economics in the United Kingdom. Dr. Hinton is a prize-winning author of a number of books and publications in the area of policing and democratization in the developing world. She is fluent in English, French, Portuguese, and Span- ish. Her books include Policing Developing Democracies (Routledge, 2009; co-edited with Tim Newburn) and The State on the Streets: Police and Poli- tics in Argentina and Brazil (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2006), which was awarded the British Society for Criminology’s prize for best book of 2006. Larke Nahme Huang, Ph.D., a licensed clinical–community psychologist, is senior advisor to the administrator of the Substance Abuse and Men- tal Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In this position she provides leadership on national policy for mental health and substance use issues for children, adolescents, and families. She is also the agency lead on issues of behav- ioral health equity and eliminating disparities and for the administrator’s Strategic Initiative on Trauma and Justice. In 2009 she did a six-month leadership exchange at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where she was a senior advisor on mental health. For the past 25 years Dr. Huang has worked at the interface of practice, research, and policy. She has assumed multiple leadership roles dedicated to improving the lives of chil- dren, families, and communities. She has been a community mental health practitioner; a faculty member at the University of California, Berkeley and Georgetown University; and a research director at the American Institutes for Research. She has worked with states and communities to build sys- tems of care for children with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. She has developed programs for underserved, culturally and linguistically diverse youth; evaluated community-based programs; and authored books

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216 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN and articles on children’s behavioral health and transforming systems and services. Her publications include “Advancing Efforts to Improve Chil- dren’s Mental Health in America” (Administration and Policy in Mental Health, 2010) and Children of Color: Psychological Interventions with Culturally Diverse Youth (Jossey-Bass, 2003). In 2003 Dr. Huang served as an appointed commissioner on the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. L. Rowell Huesmann, Ph.D., M.S., is the Amos N. Tversky Collegiate Pro- fessor of Psychology and Communication Studies and director of the Re- search Center for Group Dynamics at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. He is also editor of the journal Aggressive Behavior and past president of the International Society for Research on Aggres- sion. His research over the past 40 years has focused on the psychological foundations of aggressive and violent behavior and on how predisposing personal factors interact with precipitating situational factors to engender violent behavior. This research has included several life span longitudinal studies showing how the roots of aggressive behavior are often established in childhood. One particular interest has been investigating how children learn through imitation and how children’s exposure to violence in the family, schools, community, and mass media stimulates the development of their own aggressive and violent behavior over time. He has conducted longitudinal studies on the effects of exposure to violence at multiple sites in the United States as well as in Finland, Poland, Israel, and Palestine. These studies have shown that simply seeing a lot of violence (political violence, family violence, community violence, media violence) in childhood changes children’s thinking and perceptions and increases the risk of interpersonal aggressive behavior later in life. He has also conducted research showing that interventions that change children’s beliefs about the appropriateness of conflict and aggression can be effective in preventing aggression. In 2005 Dr. Huesmann was the recipient of the American Psychological Associa- tion’s award for distinguished lifetime contributions to media psychology. Kevin Jennings, M.A., M.B.A., is assistant deputy secretary for the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools at the U.S. Department of Education. Previ- ously he was a high school history teacher, first at Moses Brown School in Providence, RI, and then at Concord Academy in Concord, MA, where he was chair of the history department. In 1995 Mr. Jennings left teach- ing to be the founding executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), a national education organization working to make schools safe for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students, staff, and families. He held the position of executive director at GLSEN until 2008. Among his awards are the Distinguished Service Award of the

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217 APPENDIX D National Association of Secondary School Principals and the Human and Civil Rights Award of the National Education Association. He is the author of six books, the most recent of which—Mama’s Boy, Preacher’s Son—was named a book of honor by the American Library Association in 2007. Carol M. Kurzig is president of the Avon Foundation for Women. Previ- ously, she was president of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s New York City chapter and director of public services and assistant to the president at the Foundation Center. She was a director and served as board chairman of the Support Center for Nonprofit Management and currently serves as a vice chairman of the Nonprofit Coordinating Committee Board of Directors. The Avon Foundation for Women was created in 1955 to “improve the lives of women” and is now the leading corporate-affiliated global philanthropy dedicated to women. Through 2009 Avon global philanthropy raised and awarded more than $725 million, all of which focused on women and their families (primarily for breast cancer, domes- tic violence, and emergency and disaster relief). Avon currently supports breast cancer and domestic violence programs in more than 50 countries. The foundation’s grant-making programs include the Avon Breast Can- cer Crusade, with goals to accelerate research and ensure access to care; women’s empowerment programs, with an emphasis on domestic violence through its Speak Out Against Domestic Violence program; and special programs in response to national and international emergencies. Its ex- tensive fundraising programs include the nine-city Avon Walk for Breast Cancer series and special events to raise awareness and funds for gender violence programs. Joanne LaCroix, M.B.A., B.S.W., is manager of the Family Violence Pre- vention Unit of the Public Health Agency of Canada. Ms. LaCroix’s back- ground is in child welfare and family violence. She began her career as a front-line social worker and gradually held a number of supervisory and managerial positions in two of Canada’s provinces, Quebec and Ontario. Much of her work as a manager at the provincial level involved building relationships that would foster concerted, coordinated responses to child abuse and family violence. In her current position in the federal govern- ment, she builds on the experience she has developed in the field to create and sustain connections among policy makers, researchers, and service providers and to continue to support and move forward the violence pre- vention agenda. The Public Health Agency of Canada leads and coordinates the federal Family Violence Initiative, a collaboration of 15 departments, agencies, and crown corporations. The initiative promotes public awareness of the risk factors of family violence and the need for public involvement in responding to it; strengthens the capacity of the criminal justice, housing,

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218 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN and health systems to respond; and supports data collection, research, and evaluation efforts to identify effective interventions. Jacqueline Lloyd, Ph.D., M.S.W., is a health scientist administrator in the Prevention Research Branch in the Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention Research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) within the National Institutes of Health. Her program areas at NIDA include screening and brief interventions, youth at risk for HIV/AIDS, en- vironmental interventions, peer interventions, women and gender research, and health communications research. Prior to joining the staff at NIDA, Dr. Lloyd held faculty positions at Temple University in the School of So- cial Administration and at the University of Maryland at Baltimore in the School of Social Work. She has taught courses in research methods, health, and mental health human behavior theory. Her own research activities have included evaluation of a community-based youth prevention program; investigation of HIV risk behaviors and substance use among youth; and investigation of the role of family, peer, and social network contextual fac- tors on risk behaviors and treatment outcomes among youth and injecting drug users. Her many publications include “HIV Risk Behaviors: Risky Sexual Activities and Needle Use Among Adolescents in Substance Abuse Treatment” (AIDS and Behavior, 2010) and “The Relationship between Lifetime Abuse and Suicidal Ideation in a Sample of Injection Drug Users” (Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 2007). Brigid McCaw, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., FACP, is medical director for the Fam- ily Violence Prevention Program at Kaiser Permanente (KP). Her teaching, research, and publications focus on developing a health systems response to intimate partner violence and the impact of intimate partner violence on health status and mental health. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Kaiser Permanente, a large nonprofit integrated health care organization serving 8.6 million members in nine states and the District of Columbia, has implemented one of the most comprehensive health care responses to domestic violence in the United States. The nationally rec- ognized “systems model” approach is available across the continuum of care, including outpatient, emergency, and inpatient care; advice and call centers; and chronic care programs. The electronic medical record includes clinician tools to facilitate recognition, referrals, resources, and follow-up for patients experiencing domestic violence and provides data for quality improvement measures. Over the past decade, identification of domestic violence has increased fivefold, with most members identified in the ambu- latory rather than acute-care settings. The majority of identified patients receive follow-up mental health services. Kaiser Permanente also provides prevention, outreach, and domestic violence resources for its workforce.

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219 APPENDIX D Violence prevention is an important focus for KP community benefit invest- ments and research studies. The KP program, under the leadership of Dr. McCaw, has received several national awards. James A. Mercy, Ph.D., is special advisor for strategic directions at the Divi- sion of Violence Prevention in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He began working at CDC in a newly formed activity to examine violence as a public health problem and, over the past two decades, has helped to develop the public health approach to violence and has conducted and overseen numer- ous studies of the epidemiology of youth suicide, family violence, homicide, and firearm injuries. Dr. Mercy also served as a co-editor of the World Report on Violence and Health prepared by the World Health Organization and served on the editorial board of the United Nation’s Secretary General’s Study of Violence Against Children. Most recently he’s been working on a global partnership with UNICEF, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, World Health Organization, and others to end sexual violence against girls. His recent publications include “Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, and Young Adult Intimate Partner Violence” (Archives of General Psychiatry, 2010) and “Sexual Violence and Its Health Consequences for Female Children in Swaziland: A Cluster Survey Study” (Lancet, 2009). Peggy Murray, Ph.D., M.S.W., is senior advisor for the Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (IAAA) at the National Institutes of Health and is responsible for the institute’s research translation initiatives in health pro- fessions education. She also serves as an adjunct professor at the Catholic University School of Social Work. She is co-author of A Medical Educa- tion Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Alcohol-Use Disorders, a 20-module curriculum and faculty development course for medical school faculty in the primary-care specialties. The model has been translated into five languages and implemented in eight countries to date. The relationship of alcohol misuse to aggressive behavior and violence is a complex one, and research has shown that this relationship is more than associative. In addition to alcohol misuse promoting aggressive behavior, victimization as a result of violence can lead to excessive alcohol consumption. Strategies to prevent violence must take this into account and, to be effective, must deal with the alcohol use of both the perpetrators and victims of violence. Alcohol affects the brain and behavior at many levels from the cell to the brain to the in- dividual as a whole, to particular neighborhoods and micro cultures, to the global society. For more than 20 years, Dr. Murray has worked at the IAAA in positions that have led to collaboration with scientists across all of its divi- sions and offices. She hopes to bring a broad perspective on alcohol misuse to the identification of effective approaches to global violence prevention.

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220 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN Michael Phillips, M.D., M.P.H., is currently director of the Suicide Research and Prevention Center of the Shanghai Mental Health Center, executive director of the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Suicide Prevention at Beijing Hui Long Guan Hospital, professor of psychiatry and global health at Emory University, professor of clinical psychiatry and clinical epidemiology at Columbia University, vice chairperson of the Chinese Society for Injury Prevention and Control, and treasurer of the International Association for Suicide Prevention. He is currently the principal investigator on a number of multi- center collaborative projects on suicide, depression, and schizophrenia. His recent publications include “Repetition of Suicide Attempts: Data from Emergency Care Settings in Five Culturally Different Low- and Middle- Income Countries Participating in the WHO SUPRE-MISS Study” (Crisis, 2010) and “Nonfatal Suicidal Behavior among Chinese Women Who Have Been Physically Abused by their Male Intimate Partners” (Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 2009). Dr. Phillips is a Canadian citizen who has been a permanent resident of China for more than 25 years. He runs a number of research training courses each year; supervises Chinese and foreign graduate students; helps coordinate WHO mental health activities in China; promotes increased awareness of the importance of addressing China’s huge suicide problem; and advocates improving the quality, com- prehensiveness, and access to mental health services around the country. Colleen Scanlon, R.N., J.D., has been senior vice president of advocacy at Catholic Health Initiatives in Denver, CO, since 1997. In this role Ms. Scanlon directs the development and integration of a comprehensive advo- cacy program within one of the largest Catholic health care systems in the country. Previously she was director of the American Nurses Association Center for Ethics and Human Rights in Washington, DC, and a clinical scholar in the Center for Clinical Bioethics at Georgetown University Medi- cal Center. Ms. Scanlon’s background includes a variety of clinical positions in palliative care, oncology, psychiatric care, and home health care nursing. She has been involved in the development of educational monographs and videos and co-authored a book entitled Managing Genetic Information: Implications for Nursing Practice (American Nurses Association, 1995). She is currently chair of the Catholic Health Association Board of Trustees and serves on the Board of Visitors of Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies and the Catholic Medical Mission Board. She has received several awards, including an Honorary Doctorate and Distin- guished Alumna Award from Georgetown University, the Mara Mogensen Flaherty Award from the Oncology Nursing Society, and the American Cancer Society Lane Adams Award.

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221 APPENDIX D Kristin Schubert, M.P.H., is a program officer for the Vulnerable Popula- tions Portfolio at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. This Portfolio invests in ideas that have the potential to represent fundamental break- throughs in the circumstances that affect vulnerable people. As a program officer, Ms. Schubert’s chief responsibility is to create and manage scal- able initiatives that recognize the critical relationship between health and where a person lives, works, learns, and plays. Her portfolio focuses on improving the health and well-being of vulnerable children, particularly adolescents, across a multitude of issues and systems, such as violence and juvenile justice. Ms. Schubert came to the Foundation in 2000 from Yale University, where she was a policy analyst for a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–funded prevention research center. Her work focused on eliminating barriers to health among racial and ethnic groups and improv- ing the health of adolescents. Earlier in her career she worked at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City as a molecular biologist. Ms. Schubert holds an M.P.H. in health policy and administration from Yale University and a B.S. in molecular biology from Lehigh University. Evelyn Tomaszewski, M.S.W., is a senior policy advisor within the Human Rights and International Affairs Division of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), where she is responsible for implementation of the NASW HIV/AIDS Spectrum Project. This project addresses a range of health and behavioral health issues with a focus on HIV/AIDS and co- occurring chronic illnesses. Ms. Tomaszewski promotes the NASW Global HIV/AIDS Initiative through collaboration with domestic and international groups and agencies, most recently, completing a capacity and training needs assessment addressing the social work workforce, volunteers, and psycho-social care providers in collaboration with FHI—Ethiopia and Phy- sicians for Peace. She staffs the National Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues and the International Committee, and she previously staffed the Women’s Issues Committee. She has expertise in policy analysis and implementation addressing gender equity, violence prevention, and early intervention; the connection of gender, equity, and risk for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections; and public health approaches to interpersonal violence and community health. Ms. Tomaszewski has more than two decades of social work experience as a counselor, community organizer, educator/trainer, and administrator. Elizabeth Ward, M.B.B.S., M.Sc., is a medical epidemiologist with years of public health experience in the Jamaican government health system. Dr. Ward is a consultant at the Institute of Public Safety and Justice at the Uni- versity of the West Indies and chair of the board of directors of the Violence

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222 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN Prevention Alliance Jamaica. She was formerly the director of disease pre- vention and control of the Health Promotion and Protection Division in the Ministry of Health. She has coordinated program development, research, and data analysis and has been responsible for disease prevention and con- trol. She spearheaded the development of the Jamaica Injury Surveillance System, which tracks hospital-based injuries island-wide. Additionally, Dr. Ward has contributed to the development of Jamician government policies as a task force member for the National Security Strategy for Safe Schools and as a member of the working groups for the security component of the National Development Plan, the National Strategic Plan for Children and Violence, and the Strategic Plan for Health Lifestyles.