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Biosketches of Committee Members

David J. Nash, Chair, U.S. Navy, Civil Engineer Corps (retired), is a senior vice president with MELE Associates, Inc., and the president of Dave Nash and Associates, a project development firm serving businesses and governments worldwide. The firm provides project and program management services throughout the world’s emerging markets for bioenergy, energy, and large infrastructure projects. RADM Nash was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 2007 for leadership in the reconstruction of devastated areas after conflicts and natural disasters. He is the current chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE). From 2005 until January 2007, RADM Nash was the president of Government Operations at BE&K, Inc., an international design-build construction firm. In 2003 and 2004, he served as the director of the Iraq Reconstruction Program. He was formerly the president of PB Buildings and manager of the Automotive Division of Parsons Brinckerhoff Construction Services, Inc. RADM Nash completed his 33-year career in the U.S. Navy as the Chief of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Chief of Civil Engineers.

RADM Nash is a member of the NAE’s Civil Engineering Peer Committee (2009-2012) and the NRC’s Committee on National Security Implications of Climate Change on U.S. Naval Forces. He has served as chair of the NRC committee that produced the report Sustainable Critical Infrastructure Systems: A Framework for Meeting 21st Century Imperatives; vice chair of the NRC Committee on Business Strategies for Public Capital Investment, which produced the study Investments in Federal Facilities: Asset Management Strategies for the 21st Century; and chair of the NRC committee that authored the 2007 report Core Competencies for Federal Facilities Asset Management Through 2020: Transformational Strategies. He is a member of the National Academy of Construction, the Society of American Military Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Society of Professional Engineers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Society of Quality Control.

Robert Berkebile, FAIA (Fellow of the American Institute of Architects), is a founding principal of BNIM Architects and has contributed 44 years to the architectural profession. He is a pioneer in restorative design with the goal of integrating social, environmental, and economic vitality. His sustainable



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A Biosketches of Committee Members David J. Nash, Chair, U.S. Navy, Civil Engineer Corps (retired), is a senior vice president with MELE Associates, Inc., and the president of Dave Nash and Associates, a project development firm serving businesses and governments worldwide. The firm provides project and program management services throughout the world’s emerging markets for bioenergy, energy, and large infrastructure projects. RADM Nash was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 2007 for leadership in the recon- struction of devastated areas after conflicts and natural disasters. He is the current chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE). From 2005 until January 2007, RADM Nash was the president of Government Operations at BE&K, Inc., an international design-build construction firm. In 2003 and 2004, he served as the director of the Iraq Reconstruction Program. He was formerly the president of PB Buildings and manager of the Automotive Division of Parsons Brinckerhoff Construction Services, Inc. RADM Nash completed his 33-year career in the U.S. Navy as the Chief of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Chief of Civil Engineers. RADM Nash is a member of the NAE’s Civil Engineering Peer Committee (2009-2012) and the NRC’s Committee on National Security Implications of Climate Change on U.S. Naval Forces. He has served as chair of the NRC committee that produced the report Sustainable Critical Infrastructure Systems: A Framework for Meeting 21st Century Imperatives; vice chair of the NRC Committee on Business Strategies for Public Capital Investment, which produced the study Investments in Federal Facilities: Asset Management Strategies for the 21st Century; and chair of the NRC committee that authored the 2007 report Core Competencies for Federal Facilities Asset Management Through 2020: Transformational Strategies. He is a member of the National Academy of Construction, the Society of American Military Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Society of Pro- fessional Engineers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Society of Quality Control. Robert Berkebile, FAIA (Fellow of the American Institute of Architects), is a founding principal of BNIM Architects and has contributed 44 years to the architectural profession. He is a pioneer in restor- ative design with the goal of integrating social, environmental, and economic vitality. His sustainable 71

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72 ACHIEVING HIGH-PERFORMANCE FEDERAL FACILITIES design and planning projects range from redeveloping plans for the former naval base in Charleston, South Carolina, to restoring towns along the Mississippi River severely damaged by natural disasters, including New Orleans. He has participated in a variety of activities including Greening of the White House, Greening of the Pentagon, and Greening of the Grand Canyon. As the founder of the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA’s) National Committee on the Envi- ronment, Mr. Berkebile has been one of the central forces behind a new focus on sustainable building that has influenced thousands of architects and changed the face of green architecture in America. He is a founding member of the U.S. Green Building Council and there he helped to develop the council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, rating system, a voluntary, consensus-based standard for developing high-performance, sustainable buildings. Since its inception in 1998, LEED has grown to encompass more than 14,000 projects in the United States and 30 countries. In 2009, Mr. Berkebile received a Heinz Award from Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Founda- tion for his role in promoting green building design and for his commitment and action toward restoring social, economic, and environmental vitality to America’s communities through sustainable architec- ture and planning. He holds a degree in architecture from the University of Kansas and is a registered architect in five states. Hillary Brown, FAIA, is a principal of New Civic Works, a firm which assists public and institutional clients in greening their facility capital programs. As founder of the Office of Sustainable Design with New York City’s Department of Design and Construction, she oversaw that office’s 1999 collaboration with the Design Trust and the High Performance Building Guidelines, and more recently she co-authored the High Performance Infrastructure Guidelines. Ms. Brown was managing editor of the nationally and internationally recognized City of New York High Performance Building Guidelines, co-author of the U.S. Green Building Council’s State and Local Green Building Toolkit, and author of Implementing High Performance Buildings. Additionally, she envisioned and co-authored the recently released High Performance Infrastructure: Best Practices for the Public Right-of-Way for New York City and the Design Trust for Public Space. Currently a practicing architect at the firm New Civic Works Ms. Brown specializes in green design for schools, universities, public buildings, and infrastructure. Previously having served on the architecture faculties at the Yale, Columbia, and Princeton University Schools of Architecture, today she is a professor of architecture at the City College of New York’s (CCNY’s) Spitzer School of Architecture. She leads the school’s contribution to CCNY’s new interdisciplinary master’s program: Sustainability in the Urban Environment, given together with the Grove School of Engineering and CCNY’s Division of Science. Ms. Brown has served on the board of directors of the U.S. Green Building Council and is now a board member for the nationally recognized Healthy Schools Network. A graduate of the Yale Univer- sity School of Architecture, she has been a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and a Bosch Public Policy Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, where she examined green building practices in Germany. Vivian Loftness, FAIA, is an internationally renowned researcher, author, and educator with more than 30 years of focus on environmental design and sustainability, advanced building systems and systems integration, and climate and regionalism in architecture, as well as design for performance in the workplace of the future. Supported by a university-building industry partnership, the Advanced Building Systems Integration Consortium of Carnegie Mellon University, she is a key contributor to the development of the Intelligent Workplace—a living laboratory of commercial building innovations for performance—and has been the author of a range of publications on international advances in the

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73 APPENDIX A workplace. Her work has influenced both national policy and building projects, including the Adapt- able Workplace Lab at the U.S. General Services Administration and the Laboratory for Cognition at Électricité de France. As a result of her research, teaching, and professional consulting, Ms. Loftness received the 2002 National Educator Honor Award from the American Institute of Architecture Students and a 2003 “Sacred Tree” Award from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). She has bachelors of science and a mas- ters of architecture degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a registered architect. She serves on the National Board of the USGBC, AIA’s Committee on the Environment (2005 national chair), and the Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Advisory Council. Ms. Loftness has served on numerous committees of the National Research Council including the following: Committee on the Effect of Climate Change on Indoor Air Quality and Public Health, Com- mittee to Review and Assess the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools, Committee to Assess Techniques for Developing Maintenance and Repair Budgets for Federal Facilities, Committee on Advanced Maintenance Concepts for Buildings, Committee on High Technology Systems for Build- ings, and the Panel on Climate-Related Data. Ms. Loftness was a member of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (1996-1999). She has delivered three congressional testimonies on sustainable design. James B. Porter, Jr., is the founder and president of Sustainable Operations Solutions, LLC, which provides consulting services to help companies make significant and sustainable improvements in workplace safety, process safety management, capital effectiveness, and operations productivity. He previously spent 40 years with the DuPont Corporation, from which he retired as chief engineer and vice president-engineering and operations. Mr. Porter joined DuPont in 1966 as a chemical engineer in the Engineering Service Division (ESD) field program at the Engineering Test Center in Newark, Delaware. In his 40 years with DuPont, he served in a number of management positions, including those in the areas of construction, investment engineering, and facilities design. With the restructuring of DuPont Engineering in November 1990, he became director-engineering operations and was subsequently named director of operations for the Fluoroproducts business (1992), director of operations (1995), vice chair of the DuPont Corporate Operations Network (1995), vice president of engineering (1996), and vice president of safety, health, and environment and engineering (2004). He is currently consulting with several companies on various aspects of construction and facilities management. Mr. Porter is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Infrastructure and the Con- structed Environment. He has served as chair of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) and Delaware’s United Negro College Fund. He was the 2004 recipient of CII’s Carroll H. Dunn Award of Excellence and in 2005 received the Engineering and Construction Contracting Association Achievement Award. He is a member of the board of governors for the Argonne National Laboratory, the board of directors for the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), FIATECH, the Mascaro Sustainability Initia- tive, and the Fieldbus Foundation. He also participates on various industry advisory boards, including AIChE’s Center for Chemical Process Safety. Mr. Porter is a member of the University of Tennessee’s College of Engineering Board of Advisors and the National Academy of Construction. He holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from the University of Tennessee. Harry G. Robinson III is a design professional educated in architecture, city planning, and urban design and is currently professor of urban design and dean emeritus and advisor to the president of Howard University and principal of TRG Consulting, an international design firm. During the period 1979-1995, he served as dean and professor of urban design, School of Architec-

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74 ACHIEVING HIGH-PERFORMANCE FEDERAL FACILITIES ture and Planning, Howard University, and in 1995-1999 as interim vice president of academic affairs and vice president for university administration, Howard University. Prior to the decanal appointment at Howard University in 1979, Mr. Robinson was the director of the Center for Built Environment Studies that he founded at Morgan State University. This set of programs—architecture, city planning, landscape architecture, and urban design—established that university’s first professional interdisciplinary curricula. Mr. Robinson is a twice presidentially appointed commissioner and elected chair, United States Commission of Fine Arts, and he was elected president of two national architectural organizations: the National Architectural Accrediting Board, 1996, and the National Council of Architectural Registra- tion Boards, 1992. He chaired the UNESCO International Commission on the Goree Memorial and Museum that was established to guide the development of this project in Dakar, Senegal. He has served on major boards and commissions, including the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, the Committee for the Preservation of the White House, the White House Historical Association, and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The recipient of the Tau Sigma Delta Architectural Honor Society Silver Medal, Mr. Robinson has been elected to membership in the American Institute of Architects’ College of Fellows and honorary membership in the Colegio de Arquitectos de Mexico, Sociedad de Arquitectos Mexicanos, and in the Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects. In 1999 he was awarded the Richard T. Ely Distinguished International Educator Award by the Lambda Alpha International Honorary Land Economics Society. In 1991, he had a partial Fulbright Fellowship at the Cooperbelt University, Kitwe, Zambia. Mr. Rob- inson’s awards from the National Organization of Minority Architects include an honor award in 1991 and a special award in 1992. In 1993 Hampton University awarded him its 125th Anniversary Citation for Leadership in Architecture. Mr. Robinson holds professional degrees in architecture and city planning, B.Arch. with design honors, and MCP, Howard University, and an advanced degree in urban design, MCP in urban design, Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Arthur H. Rosenfeld is a professor of physics (emeritus) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and a member of the California Energy Commission. Dr. Rosenfeld was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2010 “for leadership in energy efficiency research, development, and tech- nology deployment through the development of appliance and building standards and public policy.” After completing his graduate studies, Dr. Rosenfeld went to the University of California, Berkeley, where he joined, and eventually led, the Nobel prize-winning particle physics group of Luis Alvarez at LBNL, until 1974. At that time, he changed to the new field of efficient use of energy, formed the Center for Building Science at LBNL and led it until 1994. The center developed electronic ballasts for fluorescent lamps (which led to compact fluorescent lamps), low-emissivity windows, and the DOE-2 computer program for the energy analysis and design of buildings. He received the Szilard Award for Physics in the Public Interest in 1986 and the Carnot Award for Energy Efficiency from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) in 1993. In 2006, Dr. Rosenfeld received the Enrico Fermi Award, the oldest and one of the most prestigious science and technology awards given by the U.S. government. Dr. Rosenfeld is a co-founder of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, the University of California’s Institute for Energy Efficiency, and the Washington-based Center for Energy and Climate Solutions. From 1994 to 1999, Dr. Rosenfeld served as senior adviser to the DOE’s assistant secretary for energy efficiency and renewable energy. He received a Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of Chicago. E. Sarah Slaughter is the associate director for buildings and infrastructure in the Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology (MIT) Energy Initiative. Her current research focuses on innovations for sustainable

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75 APPENDIX A and disaster-resilient infrastructure and the built environment. Previously she was co-founder and the head of the Sustainability Initiative in the MIT Sloan School of Management, focusing on strategies for sustainable organizations and communities. From 1999 through 2006, Dr. Slaughter founded and ran MOCA Systems, Inc., a technology firm that developed a construction simulation software system. Prior to establishing MOCA Systems, Dr. Slaughter was an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT, where her research and teaching interests focused on construction management and engineering, innovation in building and infrastructure systems, and computer-aided process simulation of construction activities. Earlier, she was a professor of civil and environmental engi- neering at Lehigh University and conducted research in the National Science Foundation Center for the Advancement of Large Structural Systems. Dr. Slaughter was named a National Academy Associate for her service on the National Research Council (NRC) Panel on Building and Fire Research, the Commit- tee on Outsourcing Design and Construction Management Services for Federal Facilities, the Committee on Infrastructure Technology Research Agenda, and the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (1998-2001; 2007-2011). Dr. Slaughter is currently a member of the NRC Standing Committee on Defense Materials, Manu- facturing, and Infrastructure. She is also a member of the Massachusetts Sustainable Water Management Advisory Board and of the Sustainability Committee in the International Facilities Management Asso- ciation (IFMA), and she serves on several national advisory committees and editorial boards of profes- sional publications. Dr. Slaughter has published more than 50 articles and books and is a recognized expert in the field of sustainable facility assets and in innovations in the built environment. She received her S.B. in civil engineering and anthropology, S.M. in civil engineering and technology policy, and a multidisciplinary Ph.D. degree in civil engineering and management science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Clyde B. (Bob) Tatum is the Obayashi Professor of Engineering at Stanford University. He joined the Stanford construction faculty in 1983 after having had nearly 15 years of experience in heavy indus- trial and military construction. He served as the coordinator of the construction program from 1996 to 1999 and became the department chair in 1999. He is a mechanical engineering graduate of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (B.S.M.E. 1966) and the University of Michigan (M.S.E. 1970), and he earned a Master of Business Administration from New York University. Dr. Tatum has taught courses on construction engineering and mechanical and electrical systems for buildings in Stanford’s gradu- ate construction program and undergraduate civil engineering curriculum, high-tech and industrial construction, concrete construction, management of technology, case studies in managing construction projects, cost engineering, and materials management. His industry experience included responsibility as a mechanical engineer, construction engineer, resident engineer, and construction superintendent/ area manager with Ebasco Services Incorporated (1970-1981) on two large power plant projects. He is a registered professional engineer in Colorado and Washington. In 1986 he received the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, and in 1988 he received the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Construction Management Award. He was elected to the National Academy of Construction in 2002. He recently served on the National Research Council Committee to Evalu- ate Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Alternatives for the Delivery of Utility Services to the U.S. Capitol Complex.

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