FIGURE 1-1 Formaldehyde chemical structure. Formaldehyde is described as a colorless gas at room temperature with a pungent, suffocating odor.

FIGURE 1-1 Formaldehyde chemical structure. Formaldehyde is described as a colorless gas at room temperature with a pungent, suffocating odor.

Formaldehyde is a common environmental chemical that is found in ambient and indoor air. It is also present naturally in some foods and is a metabolic intermediate in the human body. For ambient air, major emission sources include power plants, incinerators, refineries, manufacturing facilities, and automobiles (ATSDR 1999; IARC 2006). Formaldehyde is also produced by vegetative decay, animal wastes, forest fires, and photochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in the lower atmosphere (ATSDR 1999; IARC 2006). The most recent EPA data on ambient-air concentrations indicate that the annual means at monitoring sites range from 0.56 to 36.31 ppb, and the overall mean is 2.77 ppb (EPA 2010). If the data are categorized by land use, agricultural locations have the lowest mean, 1.68 ppb, and locations affected primarily by mobile sources have the highest mean, 5.52 ppb.

Indoor air typically has higher formaldehyde concentrations than ambient air (ATSDR 1999; IARC 2006; EPA 2010). Major indoor emission sources include building materials, consumer products, gas and wood stoves, kerosene heaters, and cigarettes. Indoor-air concentrations depend on the age and type of construction. Older conventional homes have lower formaldehyde concentrations than newer constructions, and conventional homes have lower formaldehyde concentrations than mobile homes. Formaldehyde concentrations in indoor air have been decreasing since the 1980s, when restrictions on formaldehyde emissions from building materials were tightened (ATSDR 1999; EPA 2010; Salthammer et al. 2010). However, on the basis of a review of international studies, Salthammer et al. (2010) estimated the average formaldehyde exposure of the general population to be 16-32 ppb in air. Figure 1-2 provides ranges of formaldehyde air concentrations in various environments.

Given the pervasive exposure of the general population to some concentration of formaldehyde, federal agencies tasked with protecting public health are concerned about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure. EPA is re-evaluating regulations on the emissions of formaldehyde from composite wood products and, as part of that effort, is re-evaluating its assessment of noncancer and cancer risks associated with formaldehyde. Figure 1-3 provides a timeline of EPA’s activity since its original assessments of noncancer and cancer risks were released in 1990 and 1991, respectively.



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