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Appendix C Committee Biosketches Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, M.D. (Chair), is Chief of the Division of Epidemiology and Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Family and Preventive Medicine and Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, in La Jolla. Dr. Barrett-Connor earned a medical degree from Cornell University Medical College, in New York, New York. She completed an internal medicine internship and a residency at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, in Dallas, followed by postgraduate training in infectious diseases at the University of Miami School of Medicine, in Florida. Her research concerns healthy aging with a particular focus on gender differences and women’s health. She is author of more than 800 publications. Dr. Barrett-Connor is founder and director of the Rancho Bernardo Heart and Chronic Disease Study, begun in 1972, with continuous support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She has served as principal inves - tigator of several multicenter clinical trials, including the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions trial, the Heart and Estrogen-Progestin Replacement Study, the Raloxifene Use in the Heart Study, and the Diabetes Prevention Program. Dr. Barrett-Connor is past president of the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Associa - tion, the Epidemiology Council of the American Heart Association, the Society for Epidemiologic Research, and the American Epidemiological Society. She has been a member of the Armed Forces Epidemiology Board, the Advisory Council of the National Institute on Aging, the Board of the Menopause Society, and the Advisory Committee of the Millennium Cohort Study. She is a Master of the American College of Physicians of Medicine and a member of the Institute of Medicine. Her many honors include the National Osteoporosis Foundation 2009 Living Legacy Award and four NIH MERIT awards. John Z. Ayanian, M.D., M.P.P., is professor of medicine and health care policy at Harvard Medical School and professor of health policy and management at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is the director of the Har- vard Fellowship in General Medicine and Primary Care, director of the Health Disparities Research Program of the Harvard Catalyst, and leader of the Outcomes Research Program of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. He is also a practicing general internist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Ayanian’s research focuses on the effect of patients’ race, ethnicity, gender, insurance coverage, and socioeconomic characteristics on access to care and health outcomes, and the impact of physicians’ specialty and organizational characteristics on the quality of care. His recent studies have assessed racial disparities in quality 181

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182 A NATIONWIDE FRAMEWORK FOR SURVEILLANCE OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND CHRONIC LUNG DISEASES of care in Medicare health plans, the health effects of Medicare coverage for previously uninsured adults, and the quality of cancer care by race, ethnicity, and language. Dr. Ayanian received his B.A. degree summa cum laude with distinction in history and political science from Duke University, M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School, and M.P.P. degree in health policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He has served on Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees on the Consequences of Uninsurance (2000–2004), Guidance in Designing a National Health Care Disparities Report (2001–2002), Cancer Survivorship (2004–2005), Health Insurance Status and Its Consequences (2008–2009), and Standardized Collection of Race/Ethnicity Data for Healthcare Quality Improvement (2009). Dr. Ayanian is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. E. Richard Brown, Ph.D., is the director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research; he is also a professor in the Department of Health Services and the Department of Community Health Sciences in the UCLA School of Public Health. Brown founded the Center in 1994. It has since become one of the nation’s leading health policy research centers and the premier source of health policy information and analysis on California’s population. The Center conducts research on a wide range of health issues and provides extensive public service to policy makers, advocates, and the media. Brown’s research and publications focus on health insurance coverage, the lack of coverage and the effects on access of public policies and economic and market conditions. His work and other studies by the Center’s researchers have been used by California’s governors, legislative leaders, and advocates in crafting health care legislation, policies, and programs. Brown is the principal investigator for the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), the nation’s largest state health survey. CHIS provides statewide and local-level estimates for California’s diverse population and covers a broad range of health topics, including health status and conditions, health disparities, health insurance, and access to health care. Brown also has been extensively involved in the analysis and development of public policies, with particular emphasis on national health care reform. He has served as a senior health policy adviser to the Barack Obama for President Campaign, as health policy adviser to three members of the U.S. Senate and as a full-time senior consultant to President Clinton’s Task Force on National Health Care Reform. Brown is a past president of the American Public Health Association. He received his Ph.D. in sociology of education from the University of California, Berkeley. David B. Coultas, M.D., is currently Vice President for Clinical Affairs and Professor and Chairman of the Depart- ment of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler. He completed training in internal medicine and pulmonary disease at the University of New Mexico, and was a member of the University of New Mexico faculty for 16 years and Chief of the Division of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine for 6 years. Subsequently, he was Associate Chairman of Internal Medicine at the University of Florida HSC/Jacksonville. His personal research interests include the epidemiology of pulmonary diseases and health outcomes research, and his projects have focused on patients with interstitial lung diseases, environmental and occupational lung diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Charles K. Francis, M.D., MACP, FACC, is professor of medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (UMDNJ) and director of cardiovascular research at the Jersey Shore University Medical Center. Dr. Francis is the former director of the Center on Health Disparities and Rudin Scholar in Urban Health of the New York Academy of Medicine. In addition to his interest in racial and ethnic health disparities, medical education, and health ser- vices research, he has contributed to the literature in the areas of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction, hypertensive heart disease, mitral valve insufficiency, health and public policy, and health care for minorities. Dr. Francis has served as president of the American College of Physicians, president of the Charles R. Drew University in Los Angeles, president of the American Heart Association Western

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183 APPENDIX C States Affiliate, Los Angeles County Division, and the American Heart Association, Connecticut Affiliate and as chair of the Council on Clinical Cardiology of the American Heart Association. He has also served on the National Board of Directors of the American Heart Association, the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), the Board of Directors of the New York Academy of Medicine, as past chair of the Board of the Association of Black Cardiologists, and on the Board of Governors of the Clinical Center at NIH. Dr. Francis is board certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease and is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and Master of the American College of Physicians. He is the recipient of the Louis B. Russell Memo - rial Award presented by the American Heart Association, the Daniel D. Savage, M.D. Memorial Award presented by the Association of Black Cardiologists, the Distinguished Alumni Faculty Award, Cardiology Division, Yale University School of Medicine and the Jefferson Alumni Achievement Award, Jefferson Medical College. He is an IOM member. Dr. Francis received his undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College and his medical degree from the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. Robert J. Goldberg, Ph.D., professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is internationally recognized for his work in cardiovascular epidemiologic research, having served as principal investigator on multiple projects funded by NIH. Dr. Goldberg initiated the Worcester Heart Attack Study, ongoing since the late 1970s, to examine the incidence, survival rates, and management of acute myocardial infarction in residents of the Worcester metropolitan area. Findings from this landmark study, which is viewed as one of the pre - mier epidemiologic studies of heart disease in the United States, have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine and the Journal of the American Medical Association. He is also leading a project titled “Community Trends in Heart Failure” that has been initiated with funding from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Dr. Goldberg is actively involved in teaching public health and preventive medicine to medical students, residents, and community-based physicians. Recently, Dr. Goldberg became director of the Division of Epidemiology in a newly formed Department of Quantitative Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., L.L.D., is professor of law; co-director, Georgetown/Johns Hopkins Joint Degree in Public Health and Law. He is also an adjunct professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, and a Fellow of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. Professor Gostin was consulting legislative counsel to the U.S. Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee chaired by Senator Edward Kennedy. Professor Gostin is on the editorial boards of several journals, including law editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. He is also on the advisory committees of the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Professor Gostin was also a member of the President’s Task Force on National Health Care Reform. Thomas E. Kottke, M.D., is an internationally recognized expert in the delivery of preventive services and the prevention of chronic diseases. While on the faculty of the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, he developed the Southeastern Minnesota Womens’ Health Project (R25CA57825) to improve breast and cervical cancer screening for women in Southeastern Minnesota and the Native WEB (CCU510175) to increase access to breast and cervical cancer screening for Native American women. Dr. Kottke has also designed and implemented trials to increase the delivery of smoking cessation services in medical practice (Doctors Helping Smokers; R01CA38361) and increase the delivery of preventive services in primary care (R01HS08091). Dr. Kottke designed and implemented a com - prehensive heart disease prevention and treatment program in Olmsted County, Minnesota, CardioVision2020. Dr. Kottke has published more than 240 peer-reviewed papers, editorials, and book chapters, many on the development of systems in clinical practice to assure the delivery of preventive and chronic disease services. Dr. Kottke was a member of the first U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and both AHCPR/AHRQ task forces for the development of smoking cessation intervention guidelines. Dr. Kottke has served as a consultant to the World Health Organization on the prevention and management of chronic diseases and is a member of the faculty of the World Health Organization Non-communicable disease prevention course.

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184 A NATIONWIDE FRAMEWORK FOR SURVEILLANCE OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND CHRONIC LUNG DISEASES Elisa T. Lee, Ph.D., is George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology and director of the Center for American Indian Health Research in the College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Dr. Lee’s interests include the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and eye disease, especially among American Indian populations (specifically the Strong Heart Study and the Oklahoma Native American EXPORT Center). Current major research projects: • ardiovascular Disease in American Indians (Strong Heart Study—strongheart.ouhsc.edu)—A multicenter C longitudinal study (since 1988) of heart disease and its risk factors in 13 American Indian tribes and communities, funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of NIH. Role: P.I. of the Oklahoma Center and Coordinating Center. • top Atherosclerosis in Native Diabetics Study (SANDS)—A multicenter clinical trial to prevent heart S disease by lowering blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol in American Indians who have diabetes, funded by NHLBI/NIH. Role: P.I. of Oklahoma Center. • ative Healthy Lifestyle: A Return to Balance (Balance Study)—A culturally appropriate intervention N clinical trial to prevent heart disease in high-risk American Indians, funded by NHLBI/NIH. Role: P.I. David M. Mannino, M.D., is currently professor of medicine in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Envi - ronmental Health and the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, and the director of the Pulmonary Epidemiology Research Laboratory. He was formerly the chief science officer of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch. While at CDC he was the lead author on key publications reporting on the epidemiology of chronic obstruc - tive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. He has more than 160 publications in leading peer-reviewed journals on topics that range from the epidemiology of lung disease to health effects related to air pollutant exposure. He is an active member of and adviser to several professional organizations, including the COPD Foundation, the USCOPD Coalition, and the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is an associate editor of the journals Thorax, International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the Clinical Respiratory Journal. K. M. Venkat Narayan, M.D., M.Sc., M.B.A., is the Ruth and O.C. Hubert Professor of Global Health & Epi- demiology at Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Narayan is a product of three continents and has a richly diverse background. He is a physician-scientist trained in internal medicine, geriatric medicine, and preventive medicine, and specializes in the epidemiology and prevention of diabetes, obesity, and vascular diseases. Until 2006, he led the Diabetes Epidemiology and Statistics Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Narayan was a Visiting Scientist at NIH for 4 years before joining CDC in 1996. He is an investigator in several large, multi-center, national studies of diabetes (e.g., The TRIAD Study of diabetes quality of care, Diabetes Prevention Program [DPP], The ACCORD Trial of CVD Prevention, and The SEARCH study of diabetes in children). He has authored/coauthored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications, including invited textbook chapters and several editorials. Dr. Narayan co-directs the Emory-MDRF Global Diabetes Research Center and an Ovations/ NHLBI Global Center of Excellence for Cardiometabolic Diseases. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, Royal College of Physicians of Ireland, American Heart Association, and the Faculty of Public Health Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians (UK). Sharon-Lise T. Normand, Ph.D., M.Sc., is professor of health care policy (biostatistics) in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School and professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the development of statistical methods for health services and outcomes research, primarily using Bayesian approaches to problem solving, including methods for causal infer - ence, provider profiling, item response theory analyses, meta-analyses, latent variable analysis, and evaluation of medical devices in randomized and non-randomized settings. She serves on several task forces for the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, and was a member of the FDA Circulatory System

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185 APPENDIX C Devices Advisory Panel, and the Massachusetts Cardiac Care Quality Advisory Commission. She is currently a member of the IOM’s Committee of Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments and its Com - mittee on Future Directions for the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports. Dr. Normand is director of Mass-DAC, a data coordinating center that monitors the quality of cardiac surgeries and coronary interventions in all Massachusetts’ acute care non-federal hospitals. She earned her Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Toronto, and holds an M.S. as well as a B.S. in statistics. Dr. Normand is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, of the American College of Cardiology, of the American Heart Association, and is an Associate in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. David J. Pinsky, M.D., is the division chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Michigan (U-M), as well as a director of the U-M Cardiovascular Center. Prior to joining U-M in March 2003, Pinsky was director of research for the Cardiovascular Disease Training Program at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York and associate professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons. He served at Columbia University from 1992–2003. He earned his medical degree from Ohio State University and performed his medicine residency, as well as his research fellowship in heart failure at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. He also performed research fellowships in cardiology and vascular biology at Columbia. He has participated in strategic reviews and led a number of review panels at NIH. As a result of his groundbreaking research, Dr. Pinsky has earned a reputation as one of the country’s foremost experts in understanding the relationship between blood flow and heart and brain diseases. His research efforts have earned him numerous grants and awards, including the American Heart Association Melvin Marcus Young Investigator Award in cardiovascular physiology and the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award. Lorna Thorpe, Ph.D., M.P.H., joined as director of the Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program at the new City University of New York (CUNY) School of Public Health in November 2009. Prior to that, she served for 5 years as Deputy Commissioner for the New York City (NYC) Health Department, directing the Division of Epidemiology. At the NYC Health Department, Dr. Thorpe played a central role in cementing the Health Department’s reputation for expertise and innovation in using data to understand problems and evaluate solutions, while increasing the agency’s collaborations and visibility with outside organizations such as academic institutions, sister city agencies, community-based organizations, and federal partners. Specifically, Dr. Thorpe oversaw many innovative scientific initiatives aimed at understanding the health of NYC residents, including the launch of several large population- based health surveys, expansion of injury surveillance, improving NYC birth and death registration, and guiding the tracking of more than 71,000 exposed individuals participating in the World Trade Center Health Registry. She also played a leading role in expanding public health training opportunities for Health Department staff and future public health professionals. Dr. Thorpe previously served as a CDC chronic disease epidemiologist and she began her CDC career as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer in international tuberculosis (TB) control. Dr. Thorpe completed her Ph.D. in epidemiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, M.P.H. at the University of Michigan, and B.A. at Johns Hopkins University. She has lived and worked internationally and has published widely on both chronic and infectious disease topics. William M. Tierney, M.D., is the executive director of the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Improvement and Research (RCHIR) and senior research scientist, Regenstrief Institute, Inc.; Chancellor’s Professor in the Depart - ment of Medicine of the Indiana University School of Medicine; director of research for the Indiana University Kenya Program; director of global health for the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, and director of ResNet, one of the oldest and most productive practice-based research networks in the United States. Dr. Tierney is an internationally recognized expert in medical informatics and health services research, known for implementing and assessing electronic medical record systems to enhance quality of care. He led the team that was first to demonstrate that computerization of hospital orders can substantially reduce cost and medical errors. The technology he evaluated now supports care for large patient populations in Indiana and sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to informatics-based health services research, he has also performed dozens of epidemiologic studies

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186 A NATIONWIDE FRAMEWORK FOR SURVEILLANCE OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND CHRONIC LUNG DISEASES utilizing the clinical data stored in the clinical data repositories created by the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University’s collaborative care program in east Africa. Paul J. Wallace, M.D., is the medical director of Health and Productivity Management Programs at the Permanente Federation and senior adviser to Avivia Health from Kaiser Permanente. He is a graduate of the University of Iowa School of Medicine and completed further training in Internal Medicine and Hematology at Strong Memorial Hos - pital and the University of Rochester. Dr. Wallace is a member of the IOM Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice and served on the IOM Planning Committee for a Workshop on a Foundation for Evidence-Driven Practice: A Rapid-Learning System for Cancer Care, the IOM Planning Committee for a Workshop on Applying What We Know: Best Practices in Evidence-Based Medicine, and the IOM Subcommittee on Performance Mea - sures. Dr. Wallace is an active participant, program leader, and perpetual student in clinical quality improvement, especially in the area of translation of evidence into care delivery using people and technology-based innovation supported by performance measurement. As Kaiser Permanente’s (KP’s) Medical Director for Health and Pro - ductivity Management Programs, he leads work to extend KP’s experience with population-based care to further develop and integrate wellness, health maintenance, and productivity enhancement interventions. He is also active in the design and promotion of systematic approaches to comparative effectiveness assessment and accelerated organizational learning. He was previously the executive director of KP’s Care Management Institute (CMI) from 2000–2005 and continues as a senior adviser to CMI and to Avivia Health, the KP disease management company established in 2005. Board certified in Internal Medicine and Hematology, he previously taught clinical and basic sciences and investigated bone marrow function as a faculty member at the Oregon Health Sciences University. Dr. Wallace is a member of the Board for AcademyHealth, and serves as the Board Chair for the Center for Information Therapy. He has previously served on the National Advisory Council for AHRQ, the Medical Coverage Advisory Committee for the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Medical Advisory Panel for the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Technology Evaluation Center, the Board of Directors for DMAA: The Care Continuum Alliance, and the Committee on Performance Measurement and Standards Committee for NCQA.