Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

David H. Wegman (Chair) is professor emeritus in the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. He was founding chair of the Department of Work Environment as well as founding dean of the School of Health and Environment. His epidemiological research includes study of acute and chronic occupational respiratory disease, occupational cancer risk, and occupational musculoskeletal disorders, with special interests in study of subjective outcomes as early indicators of health effects and in surveillance of occupational conditions and risks. He is a national associate of the National Research Council and chaired the Committee on the Review of NIOSH Research Programs and the Committee on External Evaluation of NIDRR and Its Grantees. He chaired the Mine Safety and Health Administration’s Advisory Committee on the Elimination of Pneumoconiosis Among Coal Mine Workers and previously served on the Boards of Scientific Counselors for NIOSH and for the National Toxicology Program as well as on the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In 2006, he was appointed chair of the International Evaluation Group for an analysis of Occupational Health Research in Sweden. He is coeditor of Occupational and Environment Health: Recognition and Prevention of Disease and Injury. He has a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M.D. and M.Sc. degrees from Harvard University.

Sara Czaja is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the Department of Industrial Engineering at the University of Miami. She is also director of the Center



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 181
Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff David H. Wegman (Chair) is professor emeritus in the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. He was founding chair of the Department of Work Environment as well as founding dean of the School of Health and Environment. His epidemiological research includes study of acute and chronic occupational respiratory disease, occupational cancer risk, and occupational musculoskeletal disorders, with special inter- ests in study of subjective outcomes as early indicators of health effects and in surveillance of occupational conditions and risks. He is a national associate of the National Research Council and chaired the Committee on the Review of NIOSH Research Programs and the Committee on Exter- nal Evaluation of NIDRR and Its Grantees. He chaired the Mine Safety and Health Administration’s Advisory Committee on the Elimination of Pneumoconiosis Among Coal Mine Workers and previously served on the Boards of Scientific Counselors for NIOSH and for the National Toxicology Program as well as on the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmen- tal Protection Agency. In 2006, he was appointed chair of the International Evaluation Group for an analysis of Occupational Health Research in Sweden. He is coeditor of Occupational and Environment Health: Recogni- tion and Prevention of Disease and Injury. He has a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M.D. and M.Sc. degrees from Harvard University. Sara Czaja is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Univer- sity of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the Department of Industrial Engineering at the University of Miami. She is also director of the Center 181

OCR for page 181
182 HEALTH CARE COMES HOME on Research and Education for Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) and scientific director of the Center on Aging at the Miller School of Medicine. The focus of CREATE is on making technology and technology applications more useful and usable to older adult populations. She served as the principal investigator at the Miami site of the REACH program, a multisite project that evaluated the efficacy of a multicompo- nent psychosocial intervention in terms of enhancing the quality of life and reducing burden and stress for family caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients. Her primary research interests are aging and cognition, human-computer interaction, family caregiving, training, and intervention research. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and the Gerontological Society of America. At the National Research Council, she was cochair of the Panel on Human Factors Research Issues for an Aging Population and participated in the Workshop on Technology for Adaptive Aging. She is also a member of the Board on Human-Systems Integration. She has an M.S. (1976) in industrial engineer- ing and a Ph.D. (1980) in industrial engineering/human factors, both from the State University of New York at Buffalo. K. Eric DeJonge is director of geriatrics at the Washington Hospital Cen- ter in Washington, DC, where he is responsible for overall operations of the Medical House Call Program and the Geriatrics Division. In 1999, in partnership with George Taler, he cofounded the Medical House Call Program to promote the health and dignity of frail elders in their own homes. He was named the National House Call Physician of the Year in 2003 by the American Academy of Home Care Physicians and is engaged in efforts to promote innovative health policy reform for Medicare and Medicaid. He received an M.D. from Yale School of Medicine in 1991, completed residency in primary care internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in 1994, and is an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University. He completed fellowships in health policy at Georgetown University and in geriatric medicine at Johns Hopkins. He is board certified in internal medicine and geriatrics. Molly Follette Story (former Study Director) was senior program officer of the Committee on Human-Systems Integration at the National Research Council. She is co-editor of Medical Instrumentation: Accessibility and Usability Considerations and co-author of Principles of Universal Design and The Universal Design File: Designing for People of All Ages and Abili- ties. She holds six utility patents and has served as a human factors con- sultant to many companies in the medical device and consumer products industries. She is a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI),

OCR for page 181
183 APPENDIX and the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America; she was also a member of AAMI’s Human Factors Engi- neering Committee, which developed the recommended practice, HE75: 2009, Human Factors Engineering–Design of Medical Devices. She has a B.S.E. in civil engineering from Princeton University, an M.S. in product design engineering from Stanford University, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the School of Public Health at University of California, Berkeley. Daryle Jean Gardner-Bonneau is the principal of Bonneau and Associates, a human factors consultancy in Portage, Michigan, and is also an adjunct associate professor at Western Michigan University. She has been work- ing in the human factors field for over 25 years, first as an academician and then in industry and consulting. During the past 15 years, her work has concentrated on the design and evaluation of products, services, and systems, specifically with respect to their usability by older adults and people with special needs. She is also heavily involved in both national and international standards work focusing on this topic, chairs the U.S. TAG to ISO TC159–Ergonomics, and serves as a member of the Human Engineering Committee of the Association for the Advancement of Medi- cal Instrumentation. She has been the editor of Ergonomics in Design (1992-1995) and The International Journal of Speech Technology (2000- 2006) and has served on the editorial board of Human Factors as well as the advisory boards to the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers on Accessible Medical Instrumentation and Tele-rehabilitation. She has also served on peer review panels for translational research on aging and medical simulation at the National Institutes of Health. Most recently, she completed human factors work on a project on remote telemonitor- ing and education of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure. She has a Ph.D. in human performance from Ohio State University (1983). Michael Christopher Gibbons is an associate director of the Johns Hop- kins Urban Health Institute and an Assistant Professor of Medicine, Public Health and Health Sciences Informatics at Johns Hopkins. His research focuses on technology and health care disparities. He is an adviser and expert consultant to several state and federal agencies and policy makers in the areas of health information technology, e-health, minority health, and health care disparities. His current research focuses on the impact of consumer health informatics applications on health care disparities and on the role of information technologies in providing patient-centered care. He is also working with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation on the future design of personal health records. He is the author of four books, includ- ing eHealth Solutions for Healthcare Disparities, and his research is leading

OCR for page 181
184 HEALTH CARE COMES HOME the development of the emerging field of “populomics.” He has been named a health disparities scholar by the National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health. He received a medical degree from the University of Alabama, then completed residency training in preventive medicine, a molecular oncology research fellowship, and an M.P.H. degree focusing on health promotion among urban and disadvantaged populations, all from Johns Hopkins University. Laura N. Gitlin, an applied research sociologist, is currently a professor in the School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University. During the deliberations of the committee for this report she was a professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy and founding director of the Jefferson Center for Applied Research on Aging and Health and Jefferson Elder Care (an evidence-based service and training division) at Thomas Jefferson Univer- sity. She conducts programs of funded research related to developing and testing innovative home and community-based interventions to address dementia care, quality of life, functional decline, depression, and chronic disease and its management. Her intervention research focuses primarily on home environmental and behavioral approaches to helping older people and their family members to age in place and adapt to age-related chal- lenges. She is also currently involved in numerous translational research initiatives. Jefferson Elder Care seeks to translate proven interventions into real-world settings, train health and human service providers in proven programs, and deliver these evidence-based programs directly to consumers. Her publications include an introduction to research emphasizing both qualitative and quantitative methodologies used widely to train health professionals in research and a book describing the Home Environmental Skill-building Program, a proven occupational therapy home-based inter- vention for dementia caregivers. Mary Ellen O’Connell is deputy director for the Board on Behavioral, Cog- nitive, and Sensory Sciences and the Board on Human-Systems Integration. She has served as study director for five consensus studies at the National Research Council: on prevention of mental disorders and substance abuse, international education and foreign languages, ethical considerations for research on housing-related health hazards involving children, reducing underage drinking, and assessing and improving children’s health. She also served as study director for the Committee on Standards of Evidence and the Quality of Behavioral and Social Science Research, a division-wide stra- tegic planning effort; developed standalone workshops on welfare reform and children and gun violence; and facilitated meetings of the national coordinating committee of the Key National Indicators Initiative. Previ- ously, she spent 8 years in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning

OCR for page 181
185 APPENDIX and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), most recently as director of state and local initiatives. Prior to HHS, she worked at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on homeless policy and program design issues and for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as the director of field services. She has a B.A. (with distinction) from Cornell University and an M.S. in the management of human services from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Misha Pavel is currently a program director at the National Science Foun- dation in charge of a program called Smart Health and Wellbeing. Prior to this appointment, he was a professor and head of the Division on Biomedical Engineering, with a joint appointment in the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, at Oregon Health and Sci- ence University. At the same time, he was the director of the Point of Care Laboratory, which focuses on unobtrusive monitoring and neurobehavioral assessment and modeling. Prior to his academic career, he was a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories, where his research included network analysis and modeling. Prior to his academic career, he was a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories, where his research included net- work analysis and modeling. His current research is at the intersection of computational modeling of complex behaviors of biological systems, engi- neering, and cognitive science with a focus on information fusion, pattern recognition, augmented cognition, and the development of multimodal and perceptual human-computer interfaces. He developed a number of quanti- tative and computational models of perceptual and cognitive processes, eye movement control, and a theoretical framework for knowledge representa- tion; the resulting models have been applied in a variety of areas, ranging from computer-assisted instruction systems, to enhanced vision systems for aviation, to augmented cognition systems. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from New York University, an M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. P. Hunter Peckham is professor of biomedical engineering and orthopedics at Case Western Reserve University. He also serves as director for the Func- tional Electrical Stimulation Center at the Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Medical Center and director of orthopedic research for the Rehabilitation Engineering Center at MetroHealth Medical Center. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on the Committee on Spinal Cord Injury: Strategies in a Search for a Cure. He is an expert in the areas of neural prostheses and the use of electrical stimulation of nerves to restore function in cases of central nervous system paralysis and holds multiple pat-

OCR for page 181
186 HEALTH CARE COMES HOME ents related to his work. Dr. Peckham is the recipient of numerous honors and awards for his innovative research, including the Paul B. Magnuson Award and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner’s Special Citation. In 2000, he was elected Engineer of the Year by Design News. In 1996-1997, he chaired the National Institutes of Health National Advisory Board to the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research. He received his Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University. Jon Pynoos is the UPS Foundation professor of gerontology, policy and planning at the Andrus Gerontology Center of the University of Southern California (USC) where he teaches in the Davis School of Gerontology. He is also director of the National Resource Center on Supportive Hous- ing and Home Modification and codirector of the Fall Prevention Center of Excellence. He has spent his career researching, writing, and advising the government and nonprofit sectors concerning how to improve hous- ing and long-term care for the elderly. He has conducted a large number of applied research projects based on surveys and case studies of housing and aging in place. He is the coauthor of Linking Housing and Services for Older Adults: Obstacles, Options, and Opportunities; Housing the Aged: Design Directives and Policy Considerations; and Housing Frail Elders: International Policies, Perspectives and Prospects. He was a delegate to the last three White House Conferences on Aging, serves on the public policy committee of the American Society on Aging, and was vice president of the Gerontological Society of America. He is a founding member of the National Home Modification Action Coalition. Before moving to USC in 1979, he was director of an area agency on aging/home care corporation in Massachusetts that provided a range of services to keep older persons out of institutional settings and in their own homes and communities. He has won numerous awards for his work including Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships. He has undergraduate, master’s, and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. Robert M. Schumacher is managing director and co-owner of User Centric, Inc., one of the world’s largest user research companies. He is a mem- ber of the adjunct faculty at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, where he is also associated with the Program on Usability Enhancement in Health Information Technology. He has been actively involved designing and evaluating usability criteria for electronic health record systems and is currently engaged in a grant with the National Insti- tute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on the development of a usability evaluation program; he is active in the Healthcare Information and Man- agement Systems Society’s Usability Taskforce as well as other professional societies. He has authored several user interface standards and guidelines

OCR for page 181
187 APPENDIX documents, including the Ameritech Graphical User Interface Standards and Design Guidelines, which are still influential in both their form and content. Most recently, he coauthored the NIST Guide to the Processes Approach for Improving the Usability of Electronic Health Records. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive and experimental psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Judith Tabolt Matthews is the associate director of the Gerontology Pro- gram at the University Center for Social and Urban Research and faculty in the School of Nursing at the University of Pittsburgh. Her career in community health nursing practice, education, and research has particu- larly focused on application and evaluation of existing and emerging tech- nologies that may enhance independent living and self-management of chronic disorders among older adults and persons with disabilities. Her recent research has included usability and field testing of prototype robotic devices capable of offering navigational guidance to persons with wayfind- ing difficulty or real-time instruction and feedback during performance of therapeutic exercise at home. She serves on the faculty of the Quality of Life Technology Engineering Research Center, a collaboration involving Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, with projects focused on exploring potential users’ concerns and preferences regarding intelligent systems capable of providing context-aware and responsive phys- ical and cognitive support for routine activities. Her teaching responsibili- ties have included courses in community health nursing, chronic disorders, applied statistics, and ethics, as well as a project-based, robotic applications course taught with faculty from the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. She has a B.S. in nursing from the Pennsylvania State University, an M.S. in community health nursing, with an emphasis in gerontology, from Boston University, and both a Ph.D. in nursing and an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. Susan Van Hemel was a senior program officer in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences at the National Research Council (NRC) for more than 10 years before retiring in May 2010. She managed the first phase of this study on the role of human factors in home health care, which culminated in the workshop summary report. Her previous projects at the NRC include studies of early childhood assessment, staffing standards for aviation safety inspectors at the Federal Aviation Administration, organizational modeling research for the U.S. Air Force, and Social Security disability determina- tion for individuals with visual and hearing impairments and workshops on technology for adaptive aging and on decision making in older adults. Before coming to the NRC, she managed and performed work on commer- cial driver fatigue and commercial driver license vision requirements and

OCR for page 181
188 HEALTH CARE COMES HOME numerous other studies on topics related to human performance and train- ing. She is a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and its technical groups on health care and aging. She has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the Johns Hopkins University. Mary Weick Brady is a senior advisor in the Office of Surveillance and Biometrics/Center for Devices and Radiological Health in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Ms. Brady began her career at the Mayo Clinic working as a hematology nurse. She then moved to Ecuador, where she worked as a public health nurse in the Peace Corps for 2½ years. She came to the Washington DC area to work as a clinical supervisor in a long- term care and hospice facility while pursuing her master’s degree. Ms. Brady worked part-time for the Visiting Nurse Association of Northern Virginia as a home care nurse for 7 years while she was working full time for the FDA as a registered nurse monitoring and analyzing adverse events associ- ated with medical devices. She went on to supervise the team that analyzed the adverse events and eventually became a deputy division director in the division that interpreted the medical device reporting regulation and handled the contract for data entry of these reports. She currently serves as a U.S. representative to the International Standards Organization collateral draft standard on home medical equipment and is an FDA representative on the Global Harmonization Task Force that is working to harmonize regulatory bodies throughout the world. She began the Center for Devices and Radiological Health’s Home Care Committee in 2001 to monitor the safe migration of medical devices going into the home and continues to chair this group. The committee is pursuing a national labeling repository for all medical devices, home use labeling guidance, educational materials, and research studies in the area of home health. Ms. Brady graduated with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1981. She earned her master’s degree in nursing administration and a graduate certificate in international health in 1989 from George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Jennifer L. Wolff is an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health with a joint appointment in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. Trained in ger- ontology and health services research, Dr. Wolff studies chronic and long- term care delivery of services to frail and multimorbid older adults. Her current research seeks to describe and understand factors that precipitate the presence of older adults’ family members in health care delivery pro- cesses and the implications for quality of health care and patient outcomes, as a means to identifying and intervening on provider practice and health

OCR for page 181
189 APPENDIX system infrastructure to better prepare patients’ families for the roles that they assume. Dr. Wolff has received a career development award from the National Institute of Mental Health. She holds a Ph.D. in health services research and an M.H.S. in health finance and management from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and a B.A. in eco- nomics from Bucknell University.

OCR for page 181