TABLE 2-1 Types of People Involved in Health Care in the Home

Category Examples
Care Recipients Infants
Children
Adults
Elders
Informal Caregivers

Care recipients themselves

Immediate family members

Extended family members

Friends

Neighbors

Colleagues

Other acquaintances

Formal Caregivers

Home health aides, personal care attendants, social service aides

Nurses

Physicians

Pharmacists

Social workers

Physical, occupational, vocational, respiratory, speech-language therapists

Dieticians

individuals who engage in health care in the home: people who receive care (recipients), people who are informal providers of care (informal caregivers), and people who are formal providers of care (formal caregivers) (see Table 2-1). One distinction between informal and formal caregivers is that informal caregivers are typically not paid for the care provided. In addition, formal caregivers are more likely to have health care training, although it is not always specific to the provision of care in the home. We describe abilities and characteristics of people relevant to the performance of health care tasks that are common across all three groups. We also describe circumstances (e.g., living arrangements) and qualifications (e.g., type of certification) that are unique to each group and how they may influence the performance of health care tasks in the home. The overarching goal is to demonstrate how an understanding of the characteristics and abilities of these people is critical to the design of safe and effective systems of health care in the home.

RECIPIENTS OF HEALTH CARE IN THE HOME

People involved in health care in the home range from young to old and include people who are well and those with a variety of medical con-



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