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JOHN H. ARGYRIS

1913-2004

Elected in 1986

“For outstanding pioneering and continuing contributions in computer mechanics over a period of more than 30 years.”

BY THOMAS J. R. HUGHES, J. TINSELY ODEN, AND MANOLIS PAPADRAKAKIS SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY

JOHN H. ARGYRIS was a person with great vision, class, and persuasion, who dramatically influenced computational engineering and Science and who will be long remembered as one of the great pioneers of the discipline in its formative years. He passed away quietly on April 2, 2004 after respiratory complications. John rests in peace in Sankt Jorgens Cemetery in the city of Varberg, 60 km south of Goteborg, Sweden, near Argyris’s summer house.

John was born on August 19, 1913, in the city of Volos, 300 km north of Athens, Greece, into a Greek Orthodox family. His father was a direct descendant of a Greek Independence War hero, while his mother came from an old Byzantine family of politicians, poets, and scientists, which included the famous mathematician Constantine Karatheodori, professor at the University of Munich.

Volos, as it was during his childhood, remained very much alive in his memory, especially the house he grew up in. He vividly remembered, until the end, details of the room where, at the age 2, he almost died from typhoid fever.


(Note: This article was first published in 2004 in Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol. 193, pp. 3763–3766. With the permission of the authors and CMAME, we share it with you here.)



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