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WILLIAM H. PHILLIPS

1918–2009

Elected in 1991

“For theoretical and practical contributions that have advanced understanding of aircraft stability, control, guidance, flying qualities, and simulation technology.”

BY WILMER H. REED III
SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY

WILLIAM HEWITT PHILLIPS, a member of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) engineering team responsible for the success of the Apollo program died at home on June 27, 2009, at the age of 91.

He was born in Port Sunlight, England, on May 31, 1918 and came to the United States with his parents when he was 2. He earned a B.S. in 1939 and an M.S. in 1940 in aeronautical engineering, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

William Hewitt Phillips was truly one of a kind. A stranger meeting this humble, unassuming man would hardly suspect that before him stood an internationally known, highly respected technical giant in his field. His entire professional career was spent with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and NASA at Langley Research Center. His technical contributions in the field of aeronautics and space span from flight research on World War II aircraft in the early 1940s to the present-day Space Shuttle. His research and innovations related to such topics as aircraft stability, control and handling qualities, gust alleviation and aeroelastic effects,



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