ATTACHMENT D
Briefing Slides



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 17
ATTACHMENT D Briefing Slides Briefing of the Approach to the Medical Countermeasures Test and  Evaluation Facility (MCMT&EF)  Site‐Specific Risk Assessment (SSRA)  for the National Academy of Sciences  Public Meeting 21 March 2011 The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be construed to represent the positions of the Department of the Army or  Department of Defense. 17

OCR for page 17
• Our goal is to develop a SSRA that is comprehensive,  transparent, and practical by focusing on reasonably  foreseeable events, and maximum credible events that  could cause adverse health effects to people working in  and around the laboratory, members of the community  and the environment  • Assembled a diverse team of highly qualified experts who  will employ the best and most innovative methods, and  are seeking guidance/concurrence on our approach from  NAS to achieve this goal 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 2 BSA Environmental Services, Inc. • Barbara Johnson, Ph.D. • Barbara Reynolds, Ph.D. • Edward Eitzen, M.D., M.P.H. • Margaret Coleman, M.S. • Timothy Reluga, Ph.D. • Medical Modeler (TBD) • – Suggestions from NAS? 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 3 18

OCR for page 17
• Present the approach to site‐specific issues/risks topics  that were stated in the final report for the “Evaluation of  the Health and Safety Risks of the New U.S. Army  Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease  (USAMRIID) High‐Containment Facilities at Fort  Detrick Maryland” by NAS • The following slides present the issue/risk topics followed  by the Proposed Quantitative and/or Qualitative  approach • Seeking NAS concurrence/comments on the approach on  each issue/risk topic  21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 4 • Throughout the presentation, references to  USAMRIID will be used to highlight that this new  facility will operate using the increased safety  procedures and policies that USAMRIID uses • The MCMT&EF will establish similar agreements  that USAMRIID has with local government and  healthcare • USAMRIID will not own or oversee the MCMT&EF 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 5 19

OCR for page 17
• Systematically stratify the risks of different pathogens to  the general public and lab personnel by disease  mechanism Bacillus anthracis ‐ Anthrax – Ebola/Marburg virus  – Francisella tularensis ‐ Tularemia  – Brucella – Brucellosis – Arboviruses:  – • VEE ‐ Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis  • EEE ‐ Eastern Equine Encephalitis  • WEE ‐ Western Equine Encephalitis  – Yersinia pestis ‐ Plague 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 6 • Focus modeling effort where evidence of plausible  mechanisms exists for agent and route combinations,  as illustrated below – Model aerosol release for anthrax, not tularemia – Model person‐to‐person transmission for plague, not  anthrax or tularemia 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 7 20

OCR for page 17
Potential actions taken by a laboratory employee that may  circumvent biosecurity measures and maliciously expose  members of the community to infectious agents • Anthrax findings:  – Retrospective case review  – Negate future occurrences as the use of dry powders is outside  of the mission   Drying equipment will be specifically and intentionally excluded from  the facility • Identify a few other ‘biocrimes’ as case reviews that are  possible 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 8 • Biosurety Program: Current robust regulations Biosafety – Biosecurity – Biological personnel reliability program  – Agent Accountability – 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 9 21

OCR for page 17
• Tier II for “Reasonably foreseeable”/Maximum  Credible Events (MCE) scenarios – Target efforts for agent and disease mechanism • Include appropriate  quantitative measure of per‐ person risk – Order  of magnitude estimates of initial external release  and location of susceptible population 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 10 • Develop dispersal models (puff and/or plume  models), acknowledge serious limitations – Inability to represent atmospheric mixing robustly – Uncertain viability/virulence of released agent after  dilution and exposure to environmental stresses in  atmosphere – Few known mechanisms for secondary‐transmission,  reservoir‐human or human‐human • Could at best provide bounds on possible severity of hypothetical  releases 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 11 22

OCR for page 17
• Use puff and plume models in determining  regions where surveillance will be  important • Model dilution and atmospheric decay  based on agents and simulants • Develop plausible secondary transmission  scenarios  – reservoir‐human, human‐human  21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 12 • Simulate, for agent and route combinations  selected, solutions based on best available  evidence – How likely is a release and how large would it be? – What's the risk that a release will cause an index  case? – What's the risk of secondary transmissions and  spread after an index case? 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 13 23

OCR for page 17
• Address potential concerns that an escape leads to  the establishment of pathogen in a native animal or  vector reservoir and result in long‐term elevation in  disease risk to the general public  • Summarize statistics on releases that have occurred  and the results 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 14 • Analyze potential transport of Biological Select  Agents and Toxins (BSAT) as part of the biosecurity  chain‐of‐custody  – Address whether/how shipping poses a risk to the  community by accidental/intentional release, or diversion  of BSAT – Review Regulatory Processes in Shipping • CDC Form 2 and process • CDC Division SAT Internal tracking/follow through • DOD Interim Guidance for Shipping BSAT 10/08 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 15 24

OCR for page 17
• Develop outsider terrorist act scenarios considering  – Engineering features of facility – Physical security of facility • Physical security of Fort Detrick • Site‐specific characteristics – New regulatory requirements  21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 16 • Develop natural disaster scenarios – Earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados • Frequency of events in the area • Wind shear that could cause airflow reversals • Engineering features of facility – Statistics on past data of engineering failures (industry  wide) 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 17 25

OCR for page 17
• Develop potential environmental exposure scenarios  considering – Special indoor air quality engineering features  – Special engineering features of the wastewater treatment  system • MCMT&F Self‐contained Steam Sterilization • FD Wastewater Treatment System  – Performance of post‐autoclave solid waste treatment systems,  autoclave infrastructure and load testing – Statistics on past data of engineering failures (industry wide) 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 18 • Review literature involving Laboratory Acquired  Infections (LAIs) – Overview based on literature review of LAIs: exposures,  infections, and outcomes – Overview of USAMRIID LAIs from 1979‐2010 (Rusnak and  Safety Office) 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 19 26

OCR for page 17
• Summarize key case study exposures Involving BSAT  at USAMRIID – Glanders (2000)‐ lack of Personal Protective Equipment  (PPE) /gloves (?) – Ebola (2004)‐ needle stick working with animals – Tularemia (2009)‐ inadvertent aerosol/ improper use of  biological safety cabinet (BSC) (?), no respirator  – Periodic toxin exposures‐ ocular (Staphylococcal  Enterotoxin B [SEB]?) 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 20 • Analyze case studies and provide rationale for inclusion  and exclusion as potential scenarios of concern – Needle stick/sharps – Inhalation (exposure to intentionally generated  aerosol or inadvertent generation) – Ocular/mucosal splash or contact – Laboratory animal/vector exposure – Unknown route – Persons affected in adjacent work spaces 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 21 27

OCR for page 17
• Draft List of Exposure Scenarios most likely for person in the  lab and community members (should illness be unreported).  For Example: – Aerosol exposure to Y. pestis, F. tularensis: faulty BSC use,  unrecognized illness, risk to community member  – Needle stick Ebola or Marburg: medical containment suite  (MCS) admission, possible risk to health care provider  – Ocular exposures to F. tularensis: poor hand hygiene, no  risk to community/risk for personnel  – Mosquito bite VEE or WEE: unrecognized illness, local  hospital care, risk to community/health provider – Cutaneous anthrax or tularemia to abraded skin:  development of lesions, risk to family/community 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 22 • Expand training and practice – Standard/special procedures per Biosafety in  Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) – Additional procedures per Department of the Army   (DA)/USAMRIID • Develop knowledge of lessons learned and their  effectiveness (reduce incidents) – Where possible provide by year implemented and trigger  event  – Include environmental sampling in suites for B. anthracis 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 28

OCR for page 17
• Standard/special engineering controls (primary  containment; retracting needles) per BMBL • Additional engineering controls per DA/USAMRIID • Engineering controls prompted by lessons learned  and their effectiveness (reduced incidents) – Where possible provide by year implemented and trigger  event  21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 24 • Consider standard/special PPE per BMBL – Additional PPE per DA/USAMRIID – Augmented PPE prompted by lessons learned • Where possible provide by year implemented and trigger event  21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 25 29

OCR for page 17
• Continue research and practice for effective pre‐ exposure Immunization Recommended immunizations per BMBL – Additional immunizations per DA/USAMRIID – Efficacy data/break through cases involving immunizations – Vaccine Efficacy of immunizations – Reduction in LAIs since immunizations began – • Rusnak papers 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 26 • Expand practice for post‐exposure controls/reporting – Special Immunizations Program (SIP) • Describe SIP and reporting triggers • Describe SIP staffing on/off duty hours • Improvements since Nov 2009 to ensure prompt/appropriate ‘self‐ reporting’ – Transport of Laboratory Personnel Potentially Exposed to Infectious  Agents From Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD to the National Institutes of  Health Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, Bethesda, MD 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 27 30

OCR for page 17
• Consider biological accident and incident reporting – Describe how/when U.S. Army Medical Research and  Materiel Command, Maryland Public Health Lab, CDC,  Frederick Memorial Hospital, Press, and others will be  notified of LAIs – Describe Memorandum of Agreements (MOAs) and/or  written procedures – CDC Form 3  21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 28 • Consider post‐exposure medical evaluation,  prophylaxis and follow up – Briefly describe diagnostic methods and Post‐exposure  prophylaxis (PEP) – Describe patient follow up – Efficacy data for treatment regimes • Pre‐symptomatic (following high risk exposure) • Post‐symptomatic 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 31

OCR for page 17
• Consider USAMRIID Biosafety Program – Briefly describe staffing, chain of reporting,  roles/responsibilities – Training program – Proficiency demonstration/exams/records – BSL‐4 Internship and approval to work – Special training provided – Non‐compliance (reporting, remediation, retraining,  removal) 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 30 • Consider annual incident response drills Describe last two drills – What is the regulatory requirement – Who plays – Tabletop vs. live – Duration – Analysis of findings – Remedial activities and outcomes – 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 31 32

OCR for page 17
• Develop Tier II modeling for transmission of disease from  an infected laboratory worker to family or community  members – Course of infection for the agent – Likely transmission patterns following the index case – Surveillance, mitigation and management of secondary  infections • Consider data sufficient for constructing a robust model  with biological fidelity • Derive quantitative estimates of the risks and  consequences of secondary infections that may occur  subsequent to index cases 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 32 • MOA between Garrison, FMH, Barquist, USAMRIID • Garrison relationship with Frederick County Health  Department • Review how this information will be relayed to the  local government and the media in a timely manner 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 33 33

OCR for page 17
• Clarify intent of National Academy of Science  Committee – Require cumulative risk over proposed life span of the  building... To individuals in labs and the community? – Prepare quantitative and retrospective statistical analysis  from i.e. 1991‐2001 with and without anthrax letters, and  2001‐2011 (as current as feasible) • Can eliminate anthrax letters from the future as powders will not  be studied?   21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 34 • Promote credible public engagement  incrementally beginning with the USAMRIID  community panel • Foster a communication approach that is  accountable, respectful and ethical  21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 35 34

OCR for page 17
• Comprehensive • Transparent • Practical The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be construed to represent the positions of the Department of the Army or  Department of Defense. 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 36 • Does the committee concur: – With the approach to site‐specific issues/risks  topics that were stated in the final report for the  “Evaluation of the Health and Safety Risks of the  New USAMRIID High‐Containment Facilities at  Fort Detrick Maryland”?  – That the approach will address the  recommendations provided in the report? The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be construed to represent the positions of the Department of the Army or  Department of Defense. 21 Mar. 2011 NAS Briefing 37 35