as principal editor of the first and second editions of the Center’s Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence. He has published several articles on the use of court-appointed experts and is currently examining changes in dispositive motion practice in federal district courts over the past 30 years. Dr. Cecil received his J.D. and a Ph.D. in psychology from Northwestern University. He serves on the editorial boards of social science and legal journals. He has served as a member of several panels of NAS, and currently is serving as a member of the National Academies Committee on Science, Technology, and Law. Other areas of research interest include federal civil and appellate procedure, jury competence in complex civil litigation, claim construction in patent litigation, and judicial governance.

Anne-Marie Mazza is the Director of the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law. Dr. Mazza joined the National Research Council in 1995. She has served as Senior Program Officer with both the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy and the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. In 1999, she was named the first director of the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law, a newly created activity designed to foster communication and analysis among scientists, engineers, and members of the legal community. Dr. Mazza has been the study director on numerous Academy reports including Review of the Scientific Approaches Used During the FBI’s Investigation of the 2001 Anthrax Mailings (2011), Managing University Intellectual Property in the Public Interest (2010); Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward (2009); Science and Security in a Post-9/11 World (2007); Daubert Standards: Summary of Meetings (2006); Reaping the Benefits of Genomic and Proteomic Research: Intellectual Property Rights, Innovation, and Public Health (2005); Intentional Human Dosing Studies for EPA Regulatory Purposes: Scientific and Ethical Issues (2004); Ensuring the Quality of Data Disseminated by the Federal Government (2003). Dr. Mazza received an NRC distinguished service award in 2008. In 1999–2000, Dr. Mazza divided her time between the National Academies and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), where she served as a Senior Policy Analyst responsible for issues associated with a Presidential Review Directive on the government-university research partnership. Before joining the Academy, Dr. Mazza was a Senior Consultant with Resource Planning Corporation. Dr. Mazza received a B.A., an M.A., and a Ph.D. from the George Washington University.

Steven Kendall is Associate Program Officer for the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law. Mr. Kendall has contributed to numerous Academy reports including Review of the Scientific Approaches Used During the FBI’s Investigation of the 2001 Anthrax Mailings (2011), Managing University Intellectual Property in the Public Interest (2010); and Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward (2009). He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he is



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