Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of
Committee Members

S. Michael Hudson, Co-Chair, is currently Chairman of I Power Energy Systems. Prior to that he was Vice Chairman, Rolls-Royce North America Holdings, a position he assumed in early 2000 and continued until his retirement in spring 2002. He also held the positions of President and Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer, and Chief Financial Officer with Rolls-Royce Allison, following its acquisition by Rolls-Royce in 1995. He served on the Boards of several joint venture companies in which Rolls-Royce Allison had interest. After he graduated from the University of Texas with a degree in mechanical engineering, Mr. Hudson was employed by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft from 1962 to 1968, working in aircraft engine design, installation, and performance, engine development and demonstration, and industrial and marine engine application engineering. Mr. Hudson is a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Royal Aeronautical Society, an honorary fellow of the American Helicopter Society, and an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Mr. Hudson served on the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Propulsion Committee, the American Helicopter Society Propulsion Committee, the Board of Directors of the National Association of Manufacturers, and the Board of Directors of Indianapolis Water Company, and he was Chairman of the American Helicopter Society Board of Directors. Mr. Hudson was a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and he served as Chairman of the SAE’s Aerospace Council and on its Aerospace Program Office and Finance Committees. He received the SAE Franklin W. Kolk Air Transportation Progress Award and the Royal Aeronautical Society British Gold Medal. Publications range from technical work on propulsion to defense procure-



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members S. Michael Hudson, Co-Chair, is currently Chairman of I Power Energy Systems. Prior to that he was Vice Chairman, Rolls-Royce North America Holdings, a posi- tion he assumed in early 2000 and continued until his retirement in spring 2002. He also held the positions of President and Chief Executive Officer, Chief Oper- ating Officer, and Chief Financial Officer with Rolls-Royce Allison, following its acquisition by Rolls-Royce in 1995. He served on the Boards of several joint venture companies in which Rolls-Royce Allison had interest. After he graduated from the University of Texas with a degree in mechanical engineering, Mr. Hudson was em- ployed by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft from 1962 to 1968, working in aircraft engine design, installation, and performance, engine development and demonstration, and industrial and marine engine application engineering. Mr. Hudson is a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Royal Aeronautical Society, an honorary fellow of the American Helicopter Society, and an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Mr. Hudson served on the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Propulsion Committee, the American Helicopter Society Propulsion Committee, the Board of Directors of the National Association of Manufacturers, and the Board of Directors of Indianapolis Water Company, and he was Chairman of the American Helicopter Society Board of Di- rectors. Mr. Hudson was a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and he served as Chairman of the SAE’s Aerospace Council and on its Aerospace Program Office and Finance Committees. He received the SAE Franklin W. Kolk Air Transportation Progress Award and the Royal Aeronautical Society British Gold Medal. Publications range from technical work on propulsion to defense procure- 195

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U. s . A i R f o Rc e ’ s A i Rc R A f t s U s tA i n m e n t n e e d s fUtURe 196 in the ment and business initiatives. Mr. Hudson served on Air Force and Department of Defense review groups, and he was a member of NASA’s Aeronautics Advisory Committee and the Subcommittee on Rotorcraft Technology and chaired the Propulsion Aeronautics Research and Technology Subcommittee. He also served on several National Research Council (NRC) Committees, including the Commit- tee on Aeronautics Research and Technology for Environmental Compatibility, the Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-Fighter Aircraft, and the Committee on Materials Needs and R&D Strategy for Future Military Aerospace Propulsion Systems and has been a member of the NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. Michael E. Zettler (Lt Gen, USAF, Ret.), Co-Chair, is currently the Principal of a consulting firm, Z-Zettler Consulting, and is also affiliated with the Durango Group. General Zettler (retired) served in the U.S. Air Force for more than 33 years and retired in January 2004. He was last assigned at the Pentagon in Washington, DC, as the Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Installations and Logistics. He was responsible for policy, resourcing, and overseeing all Air Force logistics, including all facets of weapon systems sustainment, civil engineering, services, and communi- cations operations. He brings a wealth of experience from the private sector and the Department of Defense. He has special skills in logistics, information technology, and business operations. He recently served as a Senior Advisor to the Air Force Chief of Staff and the Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Installations, Mission Support and Logistics. Prior to starting his own successful company, he was a Se- nior Vice President of SI International Logistics’ business unit and the immediate past President of LOGTEC, a private firm specializing in logistics applications and information technology management. General Zettler earned a B.A. in chemistry from the University of Cincinnati and a master’s in management from Troy State University, and he graduated from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at Ft. McNair, Washington, D.C. He has completed advanced executive management courses at Harvard University as well as at numerous professional and management development academies. Meyer J. Benzakein, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is cur- rently Director of the Propulsion and Power Center at the Ohio State University (OSU). He assumed this position in July 2010. He recently completed a 5-year tenure as Chair of the Aerospace Engineering Department at OSU. He assumed this position in early 2005 after retiring from General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE), where he was responsible for the Research and Technology Development and New Product Creation during the past 10 years. At General Electric, he led the research effort in computational aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aeromechanics, and combus- tion. He was responsible for building one of the strongest research organizations

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Appendix A 197 in the nation. This work helped propel GEAE to the leading position in the aero propulsion field. Dr. Benzakein is currently a Co-Director of the Ohio Center of Advanced Propulsion and Power, a university alliance dedicated to the research and development of new technologies focused on turbine-based systems. He is a fellow of the American Institute Astronautics and the Royal Aeronautical Society, and he received the Gold Medal of Honor from the Royal Aeronautical Society in 2001. He is the recipient of the 2007 AIAA Reed Aeronautics Award. He has served on many national academy, industry, and government advising panels and received an honorary doctorate from the University of Poitiers, France, in 2006. Charles E. Browning is the Torley Chair in Composite Materials and Chair of the Chemical and Materials Engineering Department at the University of Dayton. He received his B.S. in chemistry from West Virginia University, his M.S. in chemistry from Wright State University, and his Ph.D. in materials engineering from the University of Dayton. Previous to his work at the university, he was Director of the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory. Dr. Browning was responsible for the planning and execution of the Air Force’s advanced materials, processes, and manufacturing and environmental technology programs to support all elements of Air Force acquisition and sustainment. Dr. Browning was also responsible for interfacing these specific areas throughout the corporate Air Force and Department of Defense. At the Materials and Manufac- turing Directorate he headed an organization of approximately 530 government employees with a yearly budget of nearly $400 million. Dr. Browning began his career with the Air Force in 1966 and has held various senior technical and man- agement positions within the laboratories. He was appointed to the Senior Execu- tive Service in 1998. He has numerous awards including Outstanding Engineer and Scientist Award from the Affiliates Society Council of Dayton, the Materials Laboratory Cleary Award for Scientific Advancement, the Materials Laboratory Schwartz Award for Engineering Excellence, the Materials Directorate Management Excellence Award, and the 2002 Meritorious Executive Presidential Rank Award. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and a fellow of the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering. Dianne Chong is Vice President of Materials Assembly, Factory & Support Tech- nology in the Boeing Engineering, Operations & Technology organization. In this position she leads the organization responsible for development and support of manufacturing processes and program integration for the Boeing Enterprise. Prior to this she was Director of Materials & Process Technology for Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Dr. Chong was also the Director of Strategic Operations and Business for IDS Engineering. In this capacity, she was the lead director for defining and implementing a solid strategy for all Boeing engineering. She has also been the

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U. s . A i R f o Rc e ’ s A i Rc R A f t s U s tA i n m e n t n e e d s fUtURe 198 in the department head/team leader of, or liaison for, the materials and process and process control groups in Phantom Works and Integrated Defense Systems. Dr. Chong received bachelor’s degrees in biology and psychology, master’s degrees in physiology and metallurgical engineering, and a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the University of Illinois. She also completed an executive master’s degree of manufacturing management at Washington University. Dr. Chong served as the St. Louis representative to Military Handbook 5, where she chaired the Aerospace Users’ Group and the Titanium Casting Group. Dr. Chong is a member of TMS, AIAA, ASM International, SME, SWE, Beta Gamma Sigma, and Tau Beta Pi. She has been recognized for managerial achievements and as a diversity change agent and as an outstanding alumna of University of Illinois in 2006. Dr. Chong has been a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. She served as President (2007-2008) and on the Board of Trustees and is a fellow of ASM International. Dr. Chong is currently serving on the National Research Council’s Board on Global Science and Technology and is a commissioner to the ABET EAC. In 2010, she received the AAEOY award for corporate management. She was also elected to the Fellows of SME in 2011. David E. Crow, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is currently a Professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Connecticut and is also consulting for power generation and aircraft engine companies. He retired as Senior Vice President of Engineering from Pratt &Whitney in April of 2002. Dr. Crow was named Senior Vice President of Pratt & Whitney’s engineering organization in May 1997. His responsibilities included the design, development, and in-service support of Pratt & Whitney’s commercial, military, and power generation engines as well as both solid and liquid rocket engines. He also led the research and development of advanced technologies systems to meet future aerospace requirements. Dr. Crow also was Senior Vice President for Pratt & Whitney’s Large Commercial Engines or- ganization, which included the high-thrust family of products: PW4000 and JT9D propulsion systems. He was responsible for engine program management, systems design and integration, product planning, and business management. Dr. Crow jointed Pratt & Whitney in 1966 as an analytical engineer and has broad experi- ence in multiple engineering disciplines and manufacturing. Dr. Crow is a member of the Connecticut Academy of Scientists and Engineers. Dr. Crow belongs to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and to the honor societies Pi Tau Sigma, Phi Eta Sigma, Tau Beta Pi, Phi Kappa Phi, and Blue Key. Dr. Crow is on the Engineering Advisory Board at University of Connecticut and is member of the University of Missouri-Rolla Academy of Mechanical Engineers. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla.

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Appendix A 199 Frank R. Faykes (Maj Gen, USAF, Ret.) is currently an independent consultant. He retired from the Air Force as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Budget, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Financial Management and Comptroller, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, DC. He was responsible for planning and directing Air Force budget formulations that annually totaled more than $136 billion. He led a staff of civilian and military financial managers who developed, integrated, and defended Air Force resource requests to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Office of Management and Budget, and Congress. He managed and executed funding that supported military operations and Air Force priorities at the direction of the Secretary of Defense and Congress. General Faykes was commissioned through the Air Force ROTC program at Virginia Tech and entered active duty in 1976. He has served in comptroller and command positions at all management levels—wing, major command, and Air Force headquarters. Prior to assuming his current position, General Faykes was Director of Financial Man- agement and Comptroller, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. In this position, he was responsible for the oversight of more than $40 billion of the Air Force budget. General Faykes holds a M.S. in management from Troy State University and is a 2001 Seminar XXI Fellow from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. John T. Foreman is currently Chief Engineer for Air Force Programs at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI), where he is responsible for providing direct acquisition and technical support to space systems, command and control systems, and enterprise system acquisition programs in the Air Force. Prior to being named Chief Engineer, he was Director of the Dynamic Systems Program and had management, technical, and financial responsibility for the COTS-based Systems initiative, Performance Critical Systems initiative, and the TIDE (Technology Insertion, Demonstration, and Evaluation) project. During 1991-1995, Mr. Foreman completed a by-government-request assignment as the Program Manager for the Software Technology for Adaptable and Reliable Systems (STARS) program at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Under his direction, the program defined and successfully demonstrated “product lines”—a new paradigm in software development. Prior to his assignment with DARPA, Mr. Foreman was Manager of SEI’s Ada and STARS support group, work- ing toward removing technical and managerial impediments to the adoption of Ada and also toward developing and transitioning new software engineering design approaches/paradigms facilitated by Ada. Mr. Foreman was the primary author of the Ada Adoption Handbook: A Program Manager’s Guide. Prior to joining SEI, he was a Branch Manager for Texas Instruments (TI), responsible for planning, directing, and executing TI’s Ada technology insertion strategy, including support to embedded, mission-critical development programs in avionics, command and

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U. s . A i R f o Rc e ’ s A i Rc R A f t s U s tA i n m e n t n e e d s fUtURe 200 in the control, and missile systems. While serving in the U.S. Air Force, Mr. Foreman’s assignments focused on the development and maintenance of large mission-critical software systems. A 1973 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, he holds an M.S. in computer science from the Florida Institute of Technology. Wesley L. Harris, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is Associ- ate Provost, Charles Stark Draper Professor, and former Head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and founding Director of the Lean Sustainment Initiative at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on theo- retical and experimental unsteady aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, computational fluid dynamics, hemo-dynamics, sustainment of complex systems, and federal government policy impact on procurement of high-technology systems. Prior to this position he served as the Associate Administrator for Aeronautics at NASA. He has also served as the Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute and Dean of Engineering, University of Connecticut. Dr. Harris earned a Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. Dr. Harris has served on numerous NRC studies and is a former member of the Air Force Studies Board. Howard F. Hetrick has been with Northrop Grumman (NG) for 37 years and has significant supportability and managerial experience. He is currently assigned to the F-35 Program as the NG Performance-Based Logistics’ Planning and Develop- ment and Sustainment Execution Integrated Product Team Lead. Mr. Hetrick’s contributions to the program have played a critical role for both NG as a Team Mate and the Lockhedd Martin Aeronautics F-35 Team. Mr. Hetrick holds the position of Supportability Engineering Technical Fellow within the corporation. He served 4 years with the U.S. Air Force as an aircraft maintenance technician and supervi- sor. Mr. Hetrick has worked for both U.S. and international programs, developing new and innovative approaches for supporting today’s weapon systems. He has played a key role in the development of the B-2 support system and the fielding of the aircraft. His professional involvement includes organizations concerned with acquisition reform initiatives, commercial standards development, commercial practices, logistics long-range planning, logistics business process re-engineering, electronic commerce and data interchange, and business enterprise development. He has been active in a variety of professional societies including the Defense Sus- tainment Consortium (DSC), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), Society of Logistics Engineers (SOLE), and National Defense Industry Association (NDIA). He holds a B.S. in Aviation Management and a M.S. in Logistics Engineering. Clyde Kizer was President and Chief Operating Officer of Airbus North America- Customer Service from 1992 until his retirement in April 2004. At Airbus, Mr. Kizer

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Appendix A 201 was responsible for all aspects of technical support for Airbus North America cus- tomers, including field service, spare parts, training, engineering, quality programs, and vendor monitoring. He also coordinated on behalf of Airbus with representa- tives of U.S. airlines and with government officials in various activities designed to assure the safe and economical operation of the air transportation industry in North America. Prior to joining Airbus in 1992, Mr. Kizer held senior executive positions with Midway Airlines, the Air Transport Association of America, and United Airlines. He retired as a Captain from the U.S. Navy following 22 years of service as a naval officer, aviator, experimental test pilot, and combat pilot with more than 9,000 flight hours during the Viet Nam era. Thomas A. McDermott, Jr. is the Director of Research and Deputy Director of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), where he is the Executive Manager for GTRI’s $200 million portfolio of research programs across eight research labs. He has 27 years of background and experience bridging applied research and development, major system development, project management, and executive management. He is a Principal Instructor in the Georgia Tech College of Engi- neering’s Professional Masters Degree in Applied Systems Engineering program, and he teaches in several continuing education courses in the areas of systems engineering, electronic warfare, and project management. He has current research interests in analysis of complex systems, systems engineering methods and tools, and leadership disciplines for engineering teams. Prior to joining GTRI, Mr. Mc- Dermott developed a large breadth of experience in both technical and manage- ment disciplines at Lockheed Martin, culminating in the role as Chief Engineer and Program Manager for the F-22 Raptor Avionics Team. While at Lockheed Martin, Mr. McDermott provided technical and management leadership in avionics and computing architectures, software architecture, computer networks, fault tolerant systems, and secure systems. He has extensive knowledge and expertise in systems and software engineering and has served on a number of government independent assessment teams for major acquisition programs. Mr. McDermott holds a B.S. in physics and an M.S. in electrical engineering, both from GTRI. Lyle H. Schwartz, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is a Senior Research Scientist with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Maryland. He was Professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University for 20 years and Director of Northwestern’s Materials Research Center for 5 of those years. He then became Director of the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, where he served for more than 12 years. His experience there included metals, ceramics, polymers, magnetic materials, techniques for characterization, and standardization of these characterization techniques, and his responsibili-

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U. s . A i R f o Rc e ’ s A i Rc R A f t s U s tA i n m e n t n e e d s fUtURe 202 in the ties included management of the R&D agenda in the context of a government laboratory. Dr. Schwartz subsequently assumed responsibility for basic research on structural materials of interest to the U.S. Air Force in addition to the areas of propulsion, aeromechanics, and aerodynamics. He then completed his government service as Director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research with responsibility for the entire basic research program of the Air Force. His current interests include government policy for R&D, particularly for materials R&D, materials science education at K-12 and university levels, and enhanced public understanding of the roles and importance of technology in society. Dr. Schwartz received his Ph.D. in materials science from Northwestern University. Bruce M. Thompson leads the System Readiness and Sustainment Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. His experience includes analyses to support lifecycle sustainment decisions for a wide variety of Department of Defense (DoD) legacy and current acquisition programs including the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the Army’s Program Executive Officer (PEO) Integra- tion, PEO Ground Combat Systems, the PM Apache Helicopter, the Missile Defense Agency’s Airborne Laser, the Navy’s PEO Littoral Combat Ships, and the Advanced Cruise Missile. Mr. Thompson also leads Sandia’s Center for System Reliability. In addition to his DoD experience, Mr. Thompson has addressed sustainment chal- lenges in the industrial sector, the energy sector (wind, coal, nuclear, and high- power electronics), and the Department of Energy’s nuclear weapons enterprise. He has more than 25 years of technical and management experience developing and applying advanced modeling, simulation, and optimization capabilities. As a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia, Mr. Thompson led de- velopment of the System of Systems Analysis Toolset (SoSAT) for the U.S. Army’s Future Combat Systems Program. He also led the design and development of the Support Enterprise Model (SEM), a global-scale integrated military logistics simu- lation toolset. Mr. Thompson has a B.Sc. in civil engineering from Loughborough University of Technology and a M.Sc. in structural mechanics from the University of Wales, Swansea. Raymond Valeika is an independent consultant advising major companies in avia- tion matters. He is an internationally recognized aviation operations executive with more than 40 years of experience managing large airline maintenance operations, equally comfortable in the United States and abroad dealing with regulators, manu- facturers. and employees. Mr. Valeika retired as Senior Vice President for Technical Operations for Delta Airlines, where he directed a worldwide maintenance and engineering staff of more than 10,000 professionals, maintaining a fleet of nearly 600 aircraft. Through his leadership and focus on continuous improvement of the human processes in aviation maintenance, Delta Technical Operations consistently

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Appendix A 203 rated at the top of the industry for performance benchmarks in the areas of safety, quality, productivity, and reliability. During his tenure, he created Delta TechOps as an entity, which has become one of the leading maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) service providers in the aviation industry. Under his leadership, TechOps implemented Six Sigma and LEAN management techniques, making it one of the most productive work groups in the industry. TechOps has been honored with numerous awards, including the FAA-AMT Diamond Award, Georgia Oglethorpe Award, Aviation Week & Space Technology MRO Innovation Award, and Star status in OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). Mr. Valeika was honored with the Air Transport Association’s Nuts and Bolts award because of his leadership in the aviation industry. In addition, his leadership of the “human” side over the years was recognized by a Humanitarian Award from the Community Mayors of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, and a Laurel from Aviation Week and Space Technology. In October of 1999 he received the Marvin Whitlock Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers because of his accomplishments and long-term leadership within the aeronautical engineering and commercial aviation industries. Most recently the Aviation Week Group honored him with a lifetime achievement award. He has lectured at many universities including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Yale, and Georgia Tech and has been on various committees for the National Academies of Science. He is former member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the National Research Council. Currently he is on the Board of Directors of Flight Safety Foundation, AerCap Inc., and SRT. Prior to working at Delta, he was the Senior Vice President of Technical Operations at Continental Airlines and Vice President of Maintenance and Engineering at Pan AM. He gradu- ated from St. Louis University with a degree in aeronautical engineering.