BOX 1-1
Overview of Regulations in Section 2713
of the Public Health Service Act

Section 2713 of the Public Health Service Act, Coverage of Preventive Health Services, which was added by the Affordable Care Act, and the interim final regulations (26 CFR 54.9815–2713T, 29 CFR 2590.715–2713, 45 CFR 147.130) require that group health plans and health insurance issuers offering health insurance coverage for groups or individuals provide benefits and prohibit the imposition of cost-sharing requirements for

  • Medical devices or services that are evidence based and that have, in effect, a rating of Grade A or B in the current recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) for the individual involved.
  • Immunizations for routine use in children, adolescents, and adults that have, in effect, a recommendation from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the individual involved. A recommended ACIP immunization is considered to be “in effect” after it has been adopted by the CDC director. A recommended immunization is considered to be for routine use if it appears on the immunization schedules of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Preventive health care and screenings for infants, children, and adolescents informed by scientific evidence and provided for in the comprehensive guidelines supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).
  • Preventive health care and screenings for women informed by scientific evidence and provided for in comprehensive guidelines supported by HRSA (not otherwise addressed by the recommendations of the USPSTF). The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is developing these guidelines and expects to issue them no later than August 1, 2011.

The complete list of recommendations and guidelines that these interim final regulations are required to cover can be found at http://www.HealthCare.gov/center/regulations/prevention.html.

ROLE OF PREVENTION IN ADDRESSING HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

Prevention is a well-recognized, effective tool in improving health and well-being and has been shown to be cost-effective in addressing many conditions early (Maciosek et al., 2010). Prevention goes beyond the use of disease prevention measures. For example, interventions to prevent injuries and binge drinking can increase positive health outcomes and reduce harm.

Historically, the many disparate components of the U.S. health care system have relied more on responding to acute problems and the urgent



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