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Study Committee Biographical Information Martha R. Grabowski, Chair, is the McDevitt Associate Chair in Informa- tion Systems, Professor and Chair of the Business Administration Depart- ment, and Director of the Information Systems Program, Le Moyne College; and Research Professor, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is a former Chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Marine Board and recently (2010) completed service as vice chair of the NRC Ocean Studies Board’s Committee on the Review of the Tsunami Warning and Forecast System and Overview of the Nation’s Tsunami Preparedness. She received a BS in nautical science from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and an MS in industrial engineering, an MBA in management and information sys- tems, and a PhD in management and information systems from RPI. Her teaching, research, and consulting focus on human factors in systems design, the impact of technology in safety-critical systems; risk analysis and risk mitigation in large-scale systems; the role of human and organi- zational error in high-consequence settings; and financial cybersecurity in complex, heterogeneous data environments. A licensed former Second Mate and retired Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve, Dr. Grabowski also chaired the NRC Committee Evaluating Shipboard Display of Automatic Identification Systems and the NRC Committee on Advances in Navigation and Piloting. She served as a member of NRC’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education Committee on Human–Systems Integration and is currently a member of the NRC Task Force on Marine Safety and Human Factors. She has served as a member of four other NRC committees. She is member of the American Bureau of Shipping. Dr. Grabowski is widely published in engineering, information systems, large-scale systems, human systems and safety science journals 232

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Study Committee Biographical Information 233 and publications. She was named a lifetime National Associate of the National Academies in 2003. Alan J. Brown is Professor of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering and NAVSEA Professor of Ship Design at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). Before joining the faculty at Virginia Tech, he was Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (1993–1997) and Associate Professor of Naval Construction and Engineering at MIT (1992–1993). He is a retired Captain of the U.S. Navy and a retired U.S. Navy Engineer- ing Duty Officer. He held assignments in ship operations, maintenance, repair, salvage, oil spill response, design, construction, ship systems research and development, and marine engineering on U.S. Navy ships and fleet staff, in shipyards, in the Naval Sea Systems Command, and in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He earned a PhD in marine engineering at MIT, a BS and an MS in naval architecture and mechanical engineering at MIT, and a BA from La Verne College. He has conducted research in naval ship design and construction process, tanker structural design, and naval ship structures for survivability. Dr. Brown is a Fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. He was the recipient of the American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) Jimmie Hamilton Award for Best Original Paper in 2008, the ASNE Solberg Award for Out- standing Achievement in Research Related to Naval Engineering in 2007, the 2007–2008 Dean’s Certificate of Teaching Excellence, and the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Service in 2008. Charles N. Calvano is Professor Emeritus of Total Ship Systems, Systems Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. His research interests include total ship systems engineering—systems engineering methods applied to the ship design environment and design and construction process; Navy surface ship survivability; and the design and integration of Navy combatant ships. Professor Calvano began his career in 1963 as a seagoing officer and was assigned in 1970 to the Boston Naval Shipyard as a drydocking officer and ship superintendent. In 1989 he became director of ship design and of advanced concepts and technology at Naval Sea Systems Command and in 1991 moved to the Naval Postgraduate School. He developed and put

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234 Naval Engineering in the 21st Century into operation the Total Ship Systems Engineering Design Center. Professor Calvano is a Fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, a Fellow of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (United Kingdom), a Life Member of the American Society of Naval Engi- neers, and a member of the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society and the International Council on Systems Engineering. He earned an MS in ocean engineering and naval engineering from MIT in 1970 and a BS in engineer- ing from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1963. He is a Professional Engineer in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Edward N. Comstock is an Engineering Fellow in Mechanical Engi- neering at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, where he serves as the Ship Community of Practice Lead. Before joining Raytheon in 2006 he worked for 31 years with the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) and 6 years with the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics and with the Marine Turbine and Gear Department of General Electric. In NAVSEA, he last served as the Director for Science and Technology and acted as the Executive Director of the Ship Design, Integration, and Engineering Directorate and previously held positions as Chief Naval Architect, Executive Director, Surface Ship Design and Systems Engineering Group, and as the Principal Assistant, Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy Appropriations Sponsor for the Chief of Naval Oper- ations. He is the President of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) and a Council Member of the American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE). He has received numerous profes- sional awards, including the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award, Supe- rior and Meritorious Civilian Service Awards, SNAME David W. Taylor Medal, ASNE Jimmie Hamilton Award, National Society of Professional Engineers’ Engineer of the Year Award, Association of Scientists and Engi- neers Silver Medal, and the University of Michigan Rosenblatt Alumni Award. He is a Fellow of SNAME. Mr. Comstock received an MSE in ship hydrodynamics in 1974 and a BSE in naval architecture and marine engi- neering in 1970, both from the University of Michigan. Narain G. Hingorani (Member, National Academy of Engineering) is a consultant in Los Altos Hills, California. He worked for the Electric Power Research Institute from 1974 to 1994, where he was Vice President,

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Study Committee Biographical Information 235 Electrical Systems Division, from 1989 to 1994. From 1968 to 1974, he was with the Bonneville Power Administration. Dr. Hingorani’s consulting practice is in the application of power electronics to transmission, distri- bution, industrial power, and marine power systems. He is a life fellow of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received an MS and a PhD from the University of Manchester and a BE from the University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India. Leonard Imas is Associate Professor of Ocean Engineering at the Stevens Institute of Technology. Before joining the faculty at Stevens Institute of Technology, he was a principal scientist in the Fluid Mechanical Systems Group at the Anteon Corporation and prior to that was a lead research scientist in the Deepwater Development Group at Chevron–Texaco Energy Company. His specialization is in the development and utilization of computational fluid mechanics and optimization methods in design analysis applications involving marine hydrodynamics and low-speed aerodynamics. His work in this area has focused on aero-hydrodynamics of high-performance racing yachts. Dr. Imas is also involved in research on the hydrodynamics and hydro-acoustics of underwater swimmers and hydromechanics of surface effect ships. He is a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Society of Naval Archi- tects and Marine Engineers. He received a PhD in hydrodynamics from MIT in 1998, an ME in aeronautical engineering from RPI in 1992, and a BS in aeronautical engineering from RPI in 1990. John D. Lee is Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Previously, Dr. Lee was a Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Iowa and Director of Human Factors Research at the National Advanced Driving Simulator. Before moving to the University of Iowa, he was a research sci- entist and deputy director at Battelle Human Factors Transportation Center. He has a background in engineering and psychology. He earned a PhD in mechanical engineering and an MS in industrial engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in 1992 and 1989, respectively. He received a BS in mechanical engineering and a BA in psychology from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 1988 and 1987, respectively. Dr. Lee has 16 years of research and consult- ing experience aimed at matching human capabilities to the demands of

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236 Naval Engineering in the 21st Century technologically intensive systems. His research addresses human error and performance in a broad range of application domains, from process control and the maritime industry to driving. Nancy G. Leveson (Member, National Academy of Engineering) is Pro- fessor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. She earned a PhD in computer science, an MS in operations research, and a BA in mathematics from the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on all aspects of system safety including design, opera- tions, management, and social aspects. She works in many industries, including aerospace, transportation, chemical plants, medical devices, nuclear power, hospitals, and oil and gas production. She served on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aerospace Safety Advi- sory Panel and the Baker Panel investigating safety culture in the Texas City Oil Refinery explosion and has been involved in many accident investigations, including serving as an expert advisor to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board and the Presidential Oil Spill Commission (Deepwater Horizon). Donald Liu (Member, National Academy of Engineering) is retired Exec- utive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for the American Bureau of Shipping. His research and interests have focused on finite element structural applications, ship structural dynamics, hull loading, structural stability, and probabilistic methods of structural analysis. He co-authored the recent Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) book on strength of ships and ocean structures. Dr. Liu is a Fellow of SNAME. He was the recipient of the U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Public Service Award for his contributions to marine safety in 2002, the 2004 David W. Taylor Medal from SNAME, and the 2006 Gibbs Brothers Medal from the National Academy of Sciences for outstanding contributions in the fields of naval architec- ture and marine engineering. He served on the National Research Council Committee on the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 Implementation Review. Dr. Liu received a B.S. degree from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, B.S. and M.S. degrees in naval architecture and marine engineering from MIT, and a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Arizona.

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Study Committee Biographical Information 237 Malcolm MacKinnon III (Member, National Academy of Engineering), Retired Admiral of the U.S. Navy and past Marine Board chair, is Man- aging Member, emeritus of MSCL LLC, a consulting firm that special- izes in ship engineering. Admiral MacKinnon previously served in various executive and command positions with the Navy from 1955 until his retirement in 1990, including Deputy Commander of Ship Design and Engineering in the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), Chief Engineer of the Navy, and Vice Commander, NAVSEA. He was Project Officer for the design and construction of SeaLabII, an underwa- ter habitat, and directed the conceptual design efforts for the Trident Class nuclear submarines. He is active in the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and the American Society of Naval Engineers. Admiral MacKinnon received a BS in naval science from the U.S. Naval Academy and an MS in naval architecture and marine engineering from MIT. He served on the Marine Board Committee to Review the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fleet Replacement and Modernization Plan and on the Committee on Marine Transportation of Heavy Oil, and he recently chaired the Committee on U.S. Marine Salvage Response Capability: A Workshop. Michael W. Toner is a retired executive vice president of General Dynamics. He was responsible for the Marine Systems group, which includes Bath Iron Works, Electric Boat, NASSCO, and AMSEA from 2003 until his retirement in December 2008. He had been a vice president of General Dynamics since January 2000 and president of Electric Boat from January 2000 to October 2003. Mr. Toner joined Electric Boat in 1965 as a test engineer and held positions including manager of Reactor Services, manager of Trident ship’s management, assistant general super- intendent of the pipe shop, and director of facilities management. In 1990, he was appointed Electric Boat’s director of operations and directed production, planning and support activities from the start of a sub- marine’s construction to its delivery. He was promoted to vice president of operations two years later. In 1994, he was appointed vice president of delivery and was responsible for production, delivery, and support activ- ities at Electric Boat’s five facilities in Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. In 1995, he became vice president of innovation and was responsible for all engineering and design activity. In 1998, he became

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238 Naval Engineering in the 21st Century senior vice president of Electric Boat. Mr. Toner earned a bachelor’s degree in nuclear science from the New York Maritime College in 1965, a master’s degree in engineering from the University of Connecticut in 1970, and an executive-level master’s degree in business administration from the University of New Haven in 1982. He also received an honorary doctor of letters degree from Maine Maritime Academy and State Uni- versity of New York Maritime College. Albert J. Tucker is a consultant to defense technology companies. From 1994 through 2002, he was the director of the Ship Hull, Mechanical, and Electrical Science and Technology Division at the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR), where he directed an integrated science and technology program for naval architecture and marine engineering and programs on ship and submarine stealth, structures, hydrodynamics, electrical tech- nologies, and ship automation. From 1985 until 1988 and from 1994 until his retirement in 2002, he served in positions of increasing responsibility at ONR; from 1988 until 1991 he served as the Stealth Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and from 1964 until 1985 he worked as a chief scientist and research physicist at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. Dr. Tucker is a member of the Virginia Tech Advisory Board and a member of the Institute of Electrical and Elec- tronics Engineers. He received a PhD in mechanical engineering from the Catholic University of America in 1973, an MS in engineering mechanics from Penn State University in 1964, and a BS in physics from the Univer- sity of Massachusetts in 1962. Dr. Tucker has coordinated international technical exchanges in naval engineering, has established a university research consortium, and is a member of Sigma Xi. Vincent Wilczynski is Deputy Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Yale University. Until 2010, he was Head of Engineering at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Captain Wilczynski served as the National Director of the Foundation for Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology (FIRST) Robotics Competition. Before beginning his teaching career, he served as a shipboard engineer and as a staff engineer and staff naval architect at the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Center. He earned a PhD in mechanical engineering at Catholic University in 1992; MS degrees in mechanical engineering and in naval architecture

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Study Committee Biographical Information 239 and marine engineering from MIT in 1987; and a BS in naval architec- ture and mechanical engineering from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 1983. He serves as the Vice President of the Center for Public Aware- ness for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and on the Executive Advisory Board of the FIRST Robotics Foundation, and he previously served as a national officer of the American Society for Engi- neering Education, as an evaluator for the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, and as a member of the State of Connecticut Department of Higher Education Board of Governor’s Advisory Com- mittee on Accreditation. Captain Wilczynski was named the 2001 Bac- calaureate Colleges Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He received the 2005 ASME Church Medal for outstanding contributions in mechanical engineering edu- cation. He is a Fellow with the American Council on Education and a Fellow of ASME. Cindy Williams is a Principal Research Scientist in the Security Studies Program of MIT. Her work at MIT includes an examination of the pro- cesses by which the U.S. government plans and budgets for national security and international affairs and an examination of the transition to all-volunteer forces in the militaries of several European countries. For- merly she was an Assistant Director of the Congressional Budget Office, where she led the National Security Division in studies of budgetary and policy choices related to defense and international security. Dr. Williams has served as a director and in other capacities at the Mitre Corporation in Bedford, Massachusetts; as a member of the Senior Executive Service in the Office of the Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon; and as a mathe- matician at Rand in Santa Monica, California. Her areas of specialization include the U.S. national security budget, military personnel policy, com- mand and control of military forces, and conventional air and ground forces. Dr. Williams holds a PhD in mathematics from the University of California, Irvine. She is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Pub- lic Administration and a member of the Naval Studies Board, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the International Institute for Strategic Studies. She serves on the advisory board of Women in International Security and on the editorial board of International Security.

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240 Naval Engineering in the 21st Century Ronald W. Yeung is Distinguished Professor of Hydromechanics and Ocean Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He was a visiting professor at the Center of Excellence for Ships and Ocean Struc- tures, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim in 2007; Humboldt Professor at the Institut für Schifftechnischen, Gerhard Mercator University of Duisburg, Germany in 1998; visiting professor at the Research Institute of Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Japan in 1998; and Humboldt Professor at the Institut für Schiffbau, Univer- sity of Hamburg, West Germany in 1988. From 1970 to 1971, he was a naval architect in the Advanced Marine Technology Division of Litton Ship Systems in Culver City, California. From 1974 to 1982, he was Assis- tant and then Associate Professor of Naval Architecture at the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology. He was the recipient of the Brazilian Society of Marine Engineers 2008 International Researcher Award; the Bill Zimmie Award from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2006; and the Kenneth Davidson Gold Medal from the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) in 2004. He was elected Fellow of SNAME in 1998 and was appointed the 2002–2003 Georg Weinblum Lecturer by the Deutsche Schiffbaugesellschaft and the Naval Studies Board of the National Research Council. In 2010, he received an Honorary Professorship from Harbin Engineering University, China. Dr. Yeung received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1973. Solomon C. Yim is Professor in the Department of Civil and Construc- tion Engineering at Oregon State University (OSU). Past positions include Structural Engineering Program Coordinator, OSU; Researcher in Civil Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Researcher at Exxon Production Research Company; and consultant to the Naval Facil- ities Center. He specializes in the dynamics of structures in the marine environment. He earned a PhD in civil engineering from the Univer- sity of California, Berkeley, in 1983; an MA in mathematics in 1981 and an MS in civil engineering in 1981 from the University of California, Berkeley; and a BS in civil engineering in 1976 from Rice University. Dr. Yim is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the U.S. Association for Computational Mechanics and is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has served as a member of

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Study Committee Biographical Information 241 the Marine Board’s Ship Structures Design Work Group and its Ship Structures Committee and on the organizing committee for the Sym- posium and Workshop on the Prevention of Fracture in Ship Structures. He has served on numerous other organizing committees, technical pro- gram committees, and editorial boards. He received the U.S. Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award in 1988–1991, was the U.S. Navy–American Society of Engineering Education Senior Faculty Research Fellow in 1993, and was Royal Norwegian Research Council Senior Visit- ing Research Scientist in 1994. Dick K. P. Yue is Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering and Director of International Programs at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His career has included research on computa- tional hydrodynamics, research and teaching in marine fluid mechan- ics, and the application of biomimetic principles to marine design. He is the former Associate Dean of Engineering and the developer of unique education programs and instructional methods and tools. Dr. Yue earned a ScD/PhD, an MS, and a BS in civil engineering from MIT in 1980, 1976, and 1974, respectively. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the MIT Class of 1960 Innovation in Education Award and Fellowship (2006–2008), the Japanese Government Foreign Special- ist Research Award (1987), the Henry L. Doherty Chair Professorship (1984–1986), and the Arthur T. Ippen Fellow (1976). Dr. Yue is a life member of the American Physical Society and of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers.

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