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Study Committee Biographical Information Emil H. Frankel, Chair, is the Director of Transportation Policy for the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington, D.C., and an independent con- sultant on transportation policy and public management issues. He was a Principal Consultant of Parsons Brinckerhoff, the international engi- neering and consulting firm, from 2005 to 2007. From 2002 to 2005, he was Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy of the U.S. Department of Transportation. In this position, he played a key role in the coordina- tion and development of the Bush administration’s proposal to reautho- rize the federal highway, transit, and highway safety programs. He also provided policy leadership in such areas as intermodal freight transpor- tation, reform of the nation’s intercity passenger rail system, transporta- tion project financing, and the application of information technologies to transportation systems operations. From 1991 to 1995, he was Commis- sioner of the Connecticut Department of Transportation, and from 1995 to 2001 he was Of Counsel to Day, Berry and Howard (now Day Pitney) in the law firm’s office in Stamford, Connecticut. At various times, he held appointments as Visiting Lecturer at both the Yale School of Man- agement and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, where he taught on issues of transportation, energy, environmental pol- icy, and public management. In 1995 he was a Joint Fellow of the Center for Business and Government and of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. From 1981 to 1984 and from 1985 to 1997 he was a Trustee 199 199

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200 Policy Options for Reducing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation of Wesleyan University, where he is now a Trustee Emeritus. Mr. Frankel received his bachelor’s degree from Wesleyan University and his LLB from Harvard Law School, and he was a Fulbright Scholar at Manchester University in the United Kingdom. Victoria Arroyo is Executive Director of the Georgetown University Cli- mate Center and Visiting Professor of Law. Before joining the Climate Center in 2008, she was Director of Policy Analysis for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, a position she held since the center’s incep- tion in 1998. In that capacity, she directed the center’s domestic program, developing policy positions and overseeing analytical work on domes- tic policy issues, economics, and environmental impacts. She practiced environmental law in the firm Kilpatrick Stockton from 1994 to 1998 and previously worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) overseeing the development of air toxics standards in the Office of Air and Radiation and reviewing development of criteria air pollutant regu- lations in the Office of Research and Development. From 1988 to 1991, she was the Director of Policy Analysis for the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality and served as the Governor’s Environmen- tal Adviser. She has written extensively on issues of climate policy and serves on the Editorial Board of the Climate Policy Journal. She was Man- aging Editor of the Pew Center’s book Climate Change: Science, Strate- gies, and Solutions. She has previously taught courses in environmental policy and climate change at Catholic University of America and George Mason University’s School of Public Policy. Ms. Arroyo received a BS from Emory University, an MPA from Harvard University, and a JD from Georgetown University Law Center. George C. Eads is retired Vice President of Charles River Associates (CRA), Inc. Before joining CRA in 1995, he held several positions at General Motors Corporation, including Vice President and Chief Economist, Vice President of Worldwide Economics and Market Analysis, and Vice Presi- dent of Product Planning and Economics. Before joining General Motors, he was Dean of the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, College Park. He served as a Member of President Carter’s Council of Eco- nomic Advisors. He has been involved in numerous projects concerning

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201 Study Committee Biographical Information transportation and energy. He was a member of President Clinton’s pol- icy dialogue on reducing greenhouse gas emissions from personal motor vehicles and coauthored the World Energy Council’s 1998 report Global Transport and Energy Development: The Scope for Change. In recent years, he has devoted much of his time to the World Business Council for Sus- tainable Development’s Sustainable Mobility Project, which is funded and carried out by 12 leading international automotive and energy companies. He was lead consultant during the latter stages of the project and drafted its final report, Mobility 2030: Meeting the Challenges to Sustainability. He is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on America’s Climate Choices and served on the project’s panel on mitigat- ing climate change. He is an at-large Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the Presidents’ Circle at the National Academies. Dr. Eads received a PhD in economics from Yale University. John M. German is Senior Fellow at the International Council for Clean Transportation (ICCT), a position he has held since 2008. Before join- ing ICCT, he was Manager of Environmental and Energy Analysis for American Honda Motor Company, which he joined in 1998. He has been active in the field of advanced technology for fuel economy since begin- ning his career with Chrysler in 1977. At Chrysler, he spent 8 years in the Powertrain Engineering division working primarily on technologies for improved fuel economy. After leaving Chrysler, he worked for 13 years conducting research in support of regulations at EPA’s Office of Mobile Sources laboratory in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He has authored numerous technical papers and a Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) book on hybrid gasoline–electric vehicles. He was the first recipient of the Barry D. McNutt award, presented annually by SAE for excellence in auto- motive policy analysis. Mr. German received a BS in physics from the University of Michigan. Lance R. Grenzeback is Senior Vice President at Cambridge Systematics, Inc., a transportation management consulting firm specializing in transpor- tation policy, planning, and economics. For the Federal Highway Admin- istration, he played a lead role in the development of the Freight Analysis Framework, the first comprehensive assessment of national truck, rail, and

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202 Policy Options for Reducing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation waterborne freight flows and the economic benefits of freight systems. He helped develop the Intelligent Transportation Systems Commercial Vehicle Operations Program and the Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks Program for the U.S. Department of Transportation. Mr. Grenze- back was the lead author of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials’ Freight Transportation Bottom Line Reports, which cover freight demand and logistics, highway freight, rail freight, and water- borne freight. For the Association of American Railroads and the National Surface Transportation Policy Commission, he led the National Rail Freight Infrastructure Capacity and Investment Study, a landmark assessment of the long-term capacity expansion needs of the continental U.S. freight railroads. He directed the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s report on Future Highway and Public Transportation Finance. Mr. Grenzeback has served on two Trans- portation Research Board (TRB) standing committees (the Urban Freight Transportation Committee and the Regional Transportation Systems Man- agement and Operations Committee) and on special committees (the Com- mittee for a Future Strategy for Transportation Information Management and the Committee on Strategies for Improved Passenger and Freight Travel Data). Mr. Grenzeback holds a bachelor’s degree in government and a mas- ter’s degree in city planning and economics, both from Harvard. Anthony D. Greszler is Vice President for Advanced Engineering at Volvo Powertrain North America, where he has worked since 2001. He is responsible for powertrain concept development for Mack and Volvo Trucks North America. Previous responsibilities included development of the Mack ETECH, ASET, and E7 natural gas engine and development of new engines to meet U.S. 2007 and 2010 emissions requirements. Before joining Volvo, he worked for Cummins Engine Company for 24 years on the design and development of heavy-duty diesel engines, including 2 years in Europe on N14 and L10 engines and 8 years as M11 and natural gas engine chief engineer. He serves on the Executive Committee of the Engine Manufacturers Association. He has appeared at numerous con- ferences on heavy-duty diesel engine emissions and efficiency improve- ment, commercial truck fuel efficiency, and carbon dioxide reduction in truck transport. Mr. Greszler has a BS and an MS in mechanical engi- neering from Case Western Reserve University.

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203 Study Committee Biographical Information W. Michael Hanemann is Chancellor’s Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Berkeley, where he has been on the faculty since 1976. His research has focused on aspects of modeling indi- vidual choice behavior with applications to demand forecasting, envi- ronmental regulation, and economic valuation. He is a leading authority on the methodology of nonmarket valuation using techniques of both revealed and stated preference and has written extensively on measuring and valuing environmental preferences. He has worked extensively on the economics of water resources and the economics of climate change. He has served on the NRC Planning Committee for the Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health and the Committee on Prospective Benefits of U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy R&D Programs. Dr. Hanemann received a BS from Oxford University, an MS in economics from the London School of Economics, an MA in public finance and decision theory from Harvard University, and a PhD in economics from Harvard University. Henry Lee is Lecturer in Public Policy and the Jassim Jaidah Director of the Environment and Natural Resources Program in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Govern- ment, Harvard University. He is cochair of the school’s Program on Infra- structure in a Market Economy and coprincipal investigator of the Energy, Technology, and Policy Project. Before joining JFK, he spent 9 years as Director of the Massachusetts Energy Office and Special Assistant to the Governor for Environmental Policy. He has served on numerous state, fed- eral, and private advisory committees and boards focusing on both energy and environmental issues. His recent research interests focus on environ- mental management, energy policy, climate change, the geopolitics of oil and gas, and public infrastructure projects in developing countries. He has recently written several articles on China’s oil strategies and coauthored the discussion paper “Policy Options for Reducing Oil Consumption and Greenhouse-Gas Emissions from the U.S. Transportation Sector.” Virginia McConnell is Senior Fellow in the Quality of the Environ- ment Division of Resources for the Future, Inc. She is also a Professor

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204 Policy Options for Reducing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation of Economics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her recent work has centered on the evaluation of policies to reduce motor vehicle pollution, including the analysis of inspection and maintenance programs, old-car scrap programs, and emissions taxes. She is a mem- ber of the EPA Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis and has served on several other EPA advisory committees. She has analyzed market-based policies for improving land use and the impact of envi- ronmental regulations on industry productivity. She served on the NRC Committee on Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance Programs and the Committee on State Practices in Setting Mobile Source Emis- sions Standards. Dr. McConnell received a BS in economics from Smith College and a PhD in economics from the University of Maryland. Donald L. Paul is the Executive Director of the University of Southern Cali- fornia (USC) Energy Institute, where he also holds the William M. Keck Chair in Energy Resources. The USC Energy Institute was launched in 2008 to create a university-based framework to support and expand opportu- nities in energy-related research and education, energy system and infra- structure demonstrations, and public policy development. Before joining the faculty of USC, he served as Vice President and Chief Technology Offi- cer at Chevron. During 33 years at Chevron, he held a variety of positions in research and technology, exploration and production operations, and exec- utive management, including service as president of Chevron’s Canadian subsidiary. In 2010, he was appointed to the National Petroleum Council and the Schlumberger Limited Technology Committee. He continues to serve on a number of university and public- and private-sector advisory boards and committees and holds an appointment as Senior Advisor for the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Dr. Paul was recently recog- nized for his career contributions as a recipient of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering’s Distinguished Service Award and an honorary doctorate of engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. He earned a BS in applied mathematics, a master’s degree in geology and geophysics, and a PhD in geophysics, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. John M. Samuels, Jr. (Member, National Academy of Engineering), is President of Revenue Variable Engineering, LLC, and former Senior Vice

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205 Study Committee Biographical Information President for Operations, Planning, and Support, Norfolk Southern Rail- way. He previously served as Vice President for Operations Planning and Budget at Norfolk Southern and Vice President of Operating Assets for Conrail. He was on the Pennsylvania State University industrial engi- neering faculty from 1968 until 1978, when he joined Conrail as a direc- tor of shop industrial engineering with responsibility for continuous quality improvement, engineering, mechanical operations, and operat- ing assets. He joined Norfolk Southern Railroad in 1998. He served as chair of the North American Railway Technology Working Committee and the North American Joint Positive Train Control Project. He was a member of the TRB Executive Committee from 1998 to 2003, chaired the Executive Committee in 2001, and has been a member of the Council of Industrial Engineering of the Institute of Industrial Engineers since 1982. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1996, cited for engineering and leadership in system revitalization of rail freight trans- portation. Dr. Samuels received a BS from the GMI Engineering and Management Institute (now Kettering University) and an MS and a PhD from the Pennsylvania State University. Daniel Sperling is Professor of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and founding Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1982. He is a member of the California Air Resources Board and an expert on transportation technology assessment, energy and environmental aspects of transportation, and transportation pol- icy. He has authored or coauthored more than 150 technical papers and reports on policy and analytic aspects of alternative automotive propulsion systems. He has served on numerous NRC committees and was founding chair of the TRB Committee on Alternative Transporta- tion Fuels. He authored the book Two Billion Cars and coedited Driving Climate Change: Cutting Carbon from Transportation. He is a contribu- tor to Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and was a lead author of Chapter 5, Transport and Its Infrastruc- ture, in the Fourth Assessment Report: Mitigation of Climate Change. In 2010, Dr. Sperling was awarded the 16th annual Heinz Award from the Theresa Heinz and Heinz Family Foundation in honor of his career

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206 Policy Options for Reducing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation achievements in research into alternative transportation fuels and his responsibility for the adoption of cleaner transportation policies in Cal- ifornia and across the United States. Dr. Sperling received a BS from Cornell University and a PhD in transportation engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Brian D. Taylor is Professor and Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). His research centers on transportation policy and planning, with a focus on the politics of transportation finance, including the history of freeway planning and finance; equity in highway pricing and finance; and the pricing, finance, and performance of public transit systems. His research also examines travel behavior, including the effects of congestion on travel choices, cog- nitive mapping, the burdens of transferring among modes, and patterns of driving and public transit use by those with limited access to private vehicles. Most recently he has examined the effects of external forces— terrorism threats, popular discontent with congestion, global climate change, and so forth—on transportation policy and planning. He holds a BA in geography from UCLA, an MS in civil engineering and MCP in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley, and a PhD in urban planning from UCLA. He is a member of the Ameri- can Institute of Certified Planners. Kathleen C. Taylor (Member, National Academy of Engineering) is retired Director of the Materials and Processes Laboratory of General Motors Corporation. In that position she oversaw the research conducted by more than 100 engineers and scientists in the fields of polymer composites, paint systems, metallurgy, corrosion, protective and wear-resistant coatings, tri- bology, light metals, magnetics, and optical materials. She was simultane- ously Chief Scientist for General Motors of Canada, Ltd. Earlier, she was Department Head for Physics and Physical Chemistry and Department Head for Environmental Sciences. She serves on the Board of Directors of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee, and the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advi- sory Committee. She was awarded the Garvan Medal from the American

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207 Study Committee Biographical Information Chemical Society. She was elected to the National Academy of Engineer- ing in recognition of her contributions to the development of automotive- exhaust catalytic systems and leadership in battery materials and fuel cell research. She is a fellow of SAE International and a foreign member of the Indian National Academy of Engineering. She has been president of the Materials Research Society and chair of the board of directors of the Gor- don Research Conferences. She served on NRC’s Committee for a Review of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Research Program and was a member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. Dr. Taylor received an AB in chemistry from Douglass College and a PhD in physical chemistry from Northwestern University. Ian A. Waitz is the Jerome C. Hunsaker Professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy (MIT) and Director of the Partnership for Air Transportation Noise and Emissions Reduction. His principal area of interest is the modeling and evaluation of climate, local air quality, and noise impacts of aviation, including assessment of technological, operational, and policy options for mitigating these impacts. He has written more than 60 technical pub- lications in his field, including a report to Congress on aviation and its impacts on the environment. He holds three patents and has consulted for many organizations. From 2002 to 2005 he served as Deputy Head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and has served as an editor for the AIAA’s Journal of Propulsion and Power. He was awarded the Federal Aviation Administration 2007 Excellence in Avia- tion Research Award. He was honored with the 2002 MIT Class of 1960 Innovation in Education Award and an appointment as an MIT MacVicar Faculty Fellow in 2003. He is a member of NRC’s Steering Committee on Technology for a Quieter America. Dr. Waitz received a BS from the Pennsylvania State University, an MS from George Washington Univer- sity, and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology. James J. Winebrake is Professor and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). His has published exten- sively on alternative fuels and transportation technologies, including

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208 Policy Options for Reducing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation emissions characteristics of alternative fuels, life-cycle analysis, technol- ogy forecasting and assessment, and environmental impacts of freight. He is also Director of the University–National Park Energy Partnership Pro- gram and Co-Director of the RIT Laboratory for Environmental Comput- ing and Decision Making. Before joining the faculty of RIT in 2002, he was Associate Professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Depart- ment of James Madison University (JMU). Concurrent with his position at JMU, he held a special term appointment as an energy systems analyst at Argonne National Laboratory in the Energy Systems Division of the Center for Transportation Research. From 1993 to 1995, he was a policy specialist in the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. He holds a BS in physics from Lafayette Col- lege, an MS in technology and policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a PhD in energy management and policy from the University of Pennsylvania.