Click for next page ( 132


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 131
B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS1 ANNA BARKER Dr. Barker serves as the deputy director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and as the deputy director for Strategic Scientific Initiatives. In this role she has developed and implemented multi/trans- disciplinary programs in strategic areas of cancer research and advanced technologies including: the Nanotechnology Alliance for Cancer; The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA); and the Clinical Proteomics Technologies Initiative for Cancer. She participates actively in these programs and serves in a team leadership role for TCGA. Recently she led the development of a new initiative to develop a network of trans- disciplinary centers focused on the elucidation of the “physics” of cancer at all scales through the establishment of Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers. Dr. Barker has also led and collaborated on NCI’s effort to develop contemporary resources for cancer research in the areas of biospecimens and bioinformatics (The Cancer Bioinformatics Grid) to support molecularly based personalized medicine. She serves as the co- chair of the NCI-FDA Interagency Task Force; the co-chair of the Cancer Steering Committee of the FNIH Biomarker Consortium; and oversees the NCI’s pilot international cancer research programs in Latin America and China. Dr. Barker has a long history in research and the leadership and management of research and development in the academic, non-profit and private sectors. She served as senior scientist and subsequently a senior executive at Battelle Memorial Institute for 18 years where she developed and led a large group of scientists working in drug discovery and development, pharmacology, and biotechnology, with a major focus in oncology and NCI-supported programs. She co-founded and served as the CEO of a public biotechnology drug development company and founded a private cancer technology focused company. She has served in numerous volunteer capacities for cancer research and advocacy organizations including the AACR where she led the Legislative Affairs Committee for ten years and was a member of the Board of Directors. 1 As of May 2010. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium. 131

OCR for page 131
132 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION She has received a number of awards for her contributions to cancer research, cancer patients, professional and advocacy organizations and the ongoing national effort to prevent and cure cancer. Her research interests include small molecule experimental therapeutics, tumor immunology, and free-radical biochemistry in cancer etiology and treatment. Dr. Barker completed her M.A. and Ph.D. at the Ohio State University, where she trained in chemistry, immunology, and microbiology. BILL BONVILLIAN William B. Bonvillian, since January 2006, has been director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Washington, DC Office. At MIT, he works to support MIT’s strong and historic relations with federal R&D agencies and its role on national science policy. Prior to that position, he served for 17 years as a senior policy advisor in the U.S. Senate. His legislative efforts included science and technology policies and innovation issues. He worked extensively on legislation creating the Department of Homeland Security, on Intelligence Reform, on defense and life science R&D, and on national competitiveness and innovation legislation. He has lectured and given speeches before numerous organizations on science, technology and innovation questions, is on the adjunct faculty at Georgetown, and has taught in this area at Georgetown, MIT and George Washington. He serves on the Board on Science Education of the National Academies, and has served on the Academies’ Committees on “Learning Science: Computer Games, Simulations and Education,” on “Modernizing the Infrastructure of the NSF’s Federal Funds (R&D) Survey,” and on “Exploring the Intersection of Science Education and the Development off 21st Century Skills.” He was the recipient of the IEEE Distinguished Public Service Award in 2007. His book, with Distinguished Prof. Charles Weiss of Georgetown, entitled Structuring an Energy Technology Revolution, was published by MIT Press in April 2009, and is summarized on the MIT Press Web site. His chapter, “The Connected Science Model for Innovation,” appeared in the National Research Council book, 21st Century Innovation Systems for the United States and Japan: Lessons from a Decade of Change (May 2009). His recent articles include “Stimulating a Revolution in Sustainable Energy Technology” (with C. Weiss) in Environment (July/August 2009); “The Innovation State” (July/August 2009), and “Power Play—The DARPA Model and U.S. Energy Policy” (November/December 2006) both in American Interest with the latter reprinted in the book Blindside (Brookings Press, Francis Fukuyama, ed.,

OCR for page 131
133 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 2007);“The Politics of Jobs” (2007), “Meeting the New Challenge to U.S. Economic Competitiveness” (2004) and “Organizing Science and Technology for Homeland Security” (with K.V. Sharp, 2002), all published in Issues in Science and Technology; “Will the Search for New Energy Technologies Require a New R&D Mission Agency?” (2007) in Bridges; and “Science at a Crossroads" (2002), published in Technology in Society and reprinted in the FASEB Journal. Prior to his work on the Senate, he was a partner at a large national law firm. Early in his career, he served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary and director of Congressional Affairs at the U.S. Department of Transportation, working on major transportation deregulation legislation. He received a B.A. from Columbia University with honors, an M.A.R. from Yale Divinity School in religion; and a J.D. from Columbia Law School, where he also served on the Board of Editors of the Columbia Law Review. Following law school, he served as a law clerk to a federal judge in New York. He is a member of the Connecticut Bar, the District of Columbia Bar, and the U.S. Supreme Court Bar. ANNA BORG Anna Borg, a Minister-Counselor in the Senior Foreign Service, is Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Economics, Energy and Business Affairs as of October 19, 2009. She previously served as DCM at USOECD (2008-2009), DCM at Embassy Rome from 2005-2008, and as Chief of Staff to the Under Secretary for Economic, Business, and Agricultural Affairs at the State Department from 2004- 2005. She also served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy, Terrorist Finance, Sanctions, and Commodities in the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs from 2000-2003. Prior to this she was Director of the Office of the United Kingdom, Benelux, and Ireland Affairs and from 1996-1999 was Deputy Chief of Mission at the American Embassy in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Anna Borg began her Foreign Service career in 1978 after working at The World Bank. Earlier assignments have included: policy advisor to the Deputy Secretary of State (1993), policy advisor on Bosnia in the European Bureau (1992-1993), and deputy director of the Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh Office (1990-1992). She has received a Presidential Meritorious Service Award, the 2007 Baker-Wilkins Award for DCM of the Year, the 1988 James Clement Dunn Award for FS-01 Officer of the year and State Department Superior Honor Awards. A native of Baltimore, Maryland, she received a B.A. from Swarthmore College, M.A. from George Washington University, D.E.A. from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, and diploma

OCR for page 131
134 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION from the National War College (1990). Her foreign languages are French and Italian. MICHAEL BORRUS Michael Borrus is the founding general partner of X/Seed Capital, a seed-focused early-stage venture fund that invests in entrepreneurs pursuing breakthrough innovation. Prior to founding X/Seed, he was an Executive in Residence (EIR) at Mohr Davidow Ventures (MDV) in Silicon Valley. From 1999 to 2004, Michael led the technology banking unit at The Petkevich Group, a financial services start-up. Before that, Michael was Adjunct Professor in UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering and a partner in the business consulting firm Industry and Trade Strategies. While at Berkeley, he co-founded and co-directed the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy. He is the author of three books and over 70 chapters, articles and monographs on a variety of topics including management of technology, high-technology competition, international trade and investment, and financial strategies for technology companies. Michael serves on several National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council steering committees including as Vice-Chairman of the Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives. He also serves on the board of trustees for the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) and The UC Berkeley School of Mechanical Engineering External Advisory Board. He is a director of multiple privately held technology start-ups creating products for cleantech, life science, and information technology markets. Michael is an honors graduate of Harvard Law School, the University of California, Berkeley, and Princeton University. He is a member of the California State Bar. DAN BREZNITZ Professor Dan (Danny) Breznitz (Georgia Institute of Technology, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs & The School of Public Policy, Ph.D. MIT) has extensive experience in conducting comparative in-depth research of Rapid-Innovation-Based Industries and their globalization. Dr. Breznitz’s first book, Innovation and the State: Political Choice and Strategies for Growth in Israel, Taiwan, and Ireland (Yale University Press), won the 2008 Don K. Price for best book on Science and Technology given by APSA and was a finalist for the 2007

OCR for page 131
135 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS best book of the year award in political science by ForeWord Magazine. His second book (co-authored with Michael Murphree) The Run of the Red Queen: Government, Innovation, Globalization, and Economic Growth in China is forthcoming with Yale University Press in 2010. In addition, his work was published in various journals, as well as chapters in edited volumes. Breznitz is one of five young North American scholars to be selected as a 2008 Industry Study Fellow of the Sloan Foundation. Breznitz has also been an advisor on Science Technology and Innovation Policies for multinational corporations, international organizations such as the World Bank and WIPO, and local and national governments in the United States, Asia, and Europe. During 2006 Dr. Breznitz was a visiting scholar at Stanford University’s Project on Regions of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, and during 2007 he was a Visiting Fellow at the Bruegel Institute for International Economics, Brussels. His work is sponsored by the Sloan Foundation, the Kauffman Foundation, the Samuel Neaman Institute for Advance Studies, the Bi-National Science Foundation (US Israel), the NSF, Georgia Research Alliance, and the Enterprise Innovation Institute. In addition, Dr. Breznitz is the co-director with John Zysman of UC Berkeley of a collaborative study titled “Can Wealthy Nations Stay Rich in a Rapidly Changing Global Economy?” A former founder and CEO of a small software company, Dr. Breznitz is also a research affiliate of MIT’s Industrial Performance Center. In addition he is a senior researcher of the Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy Program (STIP) and the academic director of the Initiative for High Tech Clusters at The Enterprise Innovation Institute (EI2), and the director of the Globalization, Innovation, and Development program at the Center for International Strategy, Technology and Policy (CISTP) in the Sam Nunn School of the Georgia Institute of Technology. CARL DAHLMAN Carl J. Dahlman is the Luce Professor of International Relations and Information Technology at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He joined Georgetown in January 2005 after more than 25 years of distinguished service at The World Bank. At Georgetown, Dr. Dahlman’s research and teaching explore how rapid advances in science, technology and information are affecting the growth prospects of nations and influencing trade, investment, innovation, education and economic relations in an increasingly globalizing world. At The World Bank Dr. Dahlman served as Senior Advisor to The World Bank Institute and managed the Knowledge for Development (K4D) since 1999. Prior to that he served as staff director

OCR for page 131
136 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION of the 1998-1999 World Development Report, Knowledge for Development, was the Bank’s resident representative and financial sector leader in Mexico, and led divisions in the Bank’s Private Sector Development, and Industry and Energy Departments. He has conducted extensive analytical work in major developing countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. He has co-authored eight books on the knowledge economy in different countries and many chapters and articles education and skills, and innovation. He is currently finalizing a book on the implications of the rise of China and India for the world. MARK DEAN Dr. Mark E. Dean is vice president Technical Strategy and Global Operations for IBM Research. In this role, he is responsible for setting the direction of IBM’s overall Research Strategy across eight worldwide labs and leading the global operations and information systems teams. An engineer by training, Dr. Dean has over 29 years with IBM, and is an IBM Fellow. He has been central to the design of a wide range of IBM products. Dr. Dean has held various positions in several different cities and IBM divisions. Prior to his current role, he was vice president of the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California and senior location executive for Silicon Valley, overseeing more than 400 scientists and engineers doing exploratory and applied research in various hardware, software and services areas including: nanotechnology, materials science for storage systems, data management, web technologies, workplaces practices and user interfaces. Before his appointment to the Almaden Lab in 2004, Dr. Dean was vice president for hardware and systems architecture in IBM's Systems and Technology Group in Tucson, Arizona. While there, he significantly enhanced STG’s hardware and systems strategy and architectures to support continued market share growth and industry leadership in IBM's server and storage systems business. Before STG, Dr. Dean was a vice president in IBM's Storage Technology Group, focused on the company's storage systems strategy and technology roadmap. Prior to Tucson, Dr. Dean was the VP for Systems Research at IBM's Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, where he was responsible for the research and application of systems technologies spanning circuits to operating environments. Key technologies from his research team include petaflop supercomputer systems structures (BlueGene), digital visualization, design automation tools, Linux

OCR for page 131
137 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS optimizations for servers and embedded systems, algorithms for computational science, memory compression, S/390 & PowerPC processors, embedded systems research, formal verification methods and high-speed low-power circuits. During his career, Dr. Dean has held several engineering positions at IBM in the area of computer system hardware architecture and design in Boca Raton, Florida, Austin, Texas and Yorktown Heights, New York. He has developed all types of computer systems, from embedded systems to supercomputers, including testing of the first gigahertz CMOS microprocessor, and establishing the team that developed the Blue Gene supercomputer. He was also chief engineer for the development of the IBM PC/AT, ISA systems bus, PS/2 Model 70 & 80, the Color Graphics Adapter in the original IBM PC, and holds three of the nine patents for the original IBM PC. One invention—the Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) "bus," which permitted add-on devices like the keyboard, disk drives and printers to be connected to the motherboard—would earn election to the National Inventors Hall of Fame for Dean and colleague Dennis Moeller. Dr. Dean received a BSEE degree from the University of Tennessee in 1979, an MSEE degree from Florida Atlantic University in 1982, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1992. Dr. Dean’s most recent awards include National Institute of Science Outstanding Scientist Award, member of the American Academy of Arts and Science and National Academy of Engineering, IEEE Fellow, the CCG Black Engineer of the Year, the NSBE Distinguished Engineer award, the University of Tennessee COE Dougherty Award, member of the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame, and recipient of the Ronald H. Brown American Innovators Award. Dr. Dean was appointed to IBM Fellow in 1995, IBM’s highest technical honor. He is a member of the IBM Academy of Technology. He has received several academic and IBM awards, including thirteen Invention Achievement Awards and six Corporate Awards. Dr. Dean has more than 40 patents or patents pending. EUGENE HUANG Eugene J. Huang currently serves in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy as the senior advisor to the chief technology officer. From August 2009 to April 2010, Mr. Huang served as the government operations director for the National Broadband Task Force at the Federal Communications Commission, and was part of the team

OCR for page 131
138 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION responsible for authoring “Connecting America: The National Broadband Plan.” Mr. Huang served at the United States Department of the Treasury under two Secretaries of the Treasury from 2006 to 2009, as policy advisor to the Secretary and previously as a White House Fellow. In these roles, Mr. Huang covered a wide range of international economic and finance issues with a special responsibility for U.S. bilateral relations with China. Previously, Mr. Huang was a visiting scholar at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) at Stanford University. From 2002 to 2006, Mr. Huang served the Commonwealth of Virginia under Governor Mark R. Warner as the Secretary of Technology and previously as the Deputy Secretary of Technology. At the time of his appointment as Secretary of Technology in 2004, he was the youngest cabinet member in Virginia history at the age of 28. Mr. Huang graduated magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania, with a B.S. in economics from the Wharton School, a B.S. in electrical engineering, and a M.S. in telecommunications engineering. He received a Thouron Award from the University of Pennsylvania and studied at St. Peter’s College, Oxford University, where he received a M.Phil., with distinction, in economic history. Mr. Huang is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. LOU JING Lou Jing is currently serving as deputy director of the Department of Science and Technology, of the Ministry of Education From 1998 to 2008, Ms. Lou worked in education informatization and management work, including education system infrastructure construction, resource system, systems, middleware, and user service systems; research and promotion of education informatization standardized construction work; and research of educational electronic administration construction and development; with his research receiving the National Ministry-Level Science and Technology Achievement First Class Award. Ms. Lou participated in formulation of Phases I and II of the Education Revitalization Action Plan and the formulation work for education informatization in the education development planning of the “Twelfth Five-Year Plan.” In 2007, Ms. Lou started serving as Deputy Director of the Department of Science and Technology, mainly working in the

OCR for page 131
139 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS advancement of high and new technology research and development; the construction and management of science and technology innovation and transfer platforms, such as university science and technology parks, engineering research centers, and engineering technology centers; and also researching intellectual property rights protection and organizing university science and technology strengths to benefit national innovation system construction. Lou Jing has received bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in telecommunication engineering, systems engineering, business administration, and management engineering. KRISTINA JOHNSON Kristina M. Johnson is currently the Under Secretary for Energy at the Department of Energy in Washington, DC. Prior to her appointment as Under Secretary, Dr. Johnson was provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs at The Johns Hopkins University. She received her B.S. (with distinction), M.S., and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. After a NATO post-doctoral fellowship at Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, she joined the University of Colorado- Boulder’s faculty in 1985 as an assistant professor and was promoted to full professor in 1994. From 1994 to 1999 Dr. Johnson directed the NSF/ERC for Optoelectronics Computing Systems Center at the University of Colorado and Colorado State University, and then served as dean of the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University from 1999 to 2007. Dr. Johnson was named an NSF Presidential Young Investigator in 1985 and a Fulbright Faculty Scholar fellowship in 1991. Her awards include the Dennis Gabor Prize for creativity and innovation in modern optics (1993); State of Colorado and North Carolina Technology Transfer Awards (1997, 2001); induction into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame (2003); the Society of Women Engineers Lifetime Achievement Award (2004); and in May of 2008, the John Fritz Medal, widely considered the highest award in the engineering profession. Previous recipients of the Fritz Medal include Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison and Orville Wright. In December of 2009, she was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Science from the University of Alabama at Huntsville. Dr. Johnson has 142 refereed papers and proceedings and holds 45 U.S. patents (129 U.S. and international patents) and patents pending. A fellow of the Optical Society of America, International Electronics and Electrical Engineering (IEEE), SPIE, the International Society for

OCR for page 131
140 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION Optical Engineering (former Board Member), Dr. Johnson has served on the Board of Directors of Mineral Technologies Inc., Boston Scientific Corporation, AES Corporation and Nortel Networks. She helped found several companies, including ColorLink, Inc, SouthEast Techinventures, and Unyos. PATRICK KEATING Patrick Keating is vice president, China 21C Leadership, and Cisco Managing Director, Guanghua Leadership Institute in charge of leadership programs for Chinese government officials and enterprise executives. Pat co-leads Cisco’s initiative to build a Leadership Institute in strategic partnership with the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University. In his previous role, Pat was responsible for worldwide leadership and executive education programs at Cisco. Pat has held positions in government, industry, and academia spanning the areas corporate transformation, financial management, and information technology. Pat holds a Ph.D. from Penn State University where he also earned B.S. in electrical engineering. Pat holds a master's degree in public policy from the University of Michigan. Prior to Cisco, Pat was professor of business administration at San Jose State University. GINGER LEW Ms. Lew is senior advisor to the White House National Economic Council and the SBA Administrator. She provides economic policy advice on a broad range of matters that impact small businesses. In addition, she co-chairs the White House Interagency Group on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Prior to joining the Obama Administration, Ms. Lew was the managing partner of a communications venture capital fund, and a venture advisor to a Web 2.0 venture fund. Under the Clinton Administration, Ms. Lew was the deputy administrator and chief operating officer of the U.S. Small Business Administration where she provided day to day management and operational oversight of a $42 billion loan portfolio. Before joining SBA, Ms. Lew was the General Counsel at the U.S. Department of Commerce where she specialized in international trade issues. Ms. Lew was unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate for both positions. For the past ten years, Ms. Lew was Chairman and board member of an investment fund based in Europe. She has served on the boards of publicly traded companies, private companies, and nonprofit organizations.

OCR for page 131
141 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS C.D. MOTE, JR. In September 1998, C. D. (Dan) Mote, Jr. began his tenure as president of the University of Maryland and Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering. He was recruited to lead the University of Maryland to national eminence under a mandate by the state. Since assuming the presidency, he has encouraged an environment of excellence across the University and given new impetus to the momentum generated by a talented faculty and student body. Under his leadership, academic programs have flourished. In 2005, the University was ranked 18th among public research universities, up from 30th in 1998. President Mote has emphasized broad access to the university's model, enriched undergraduate curriculum programs and launched the Baltimore Incentive Awards Program to recruit and provide full support to high school students of outstanding potential who have overcome extraordinary adversity during their lives. President Mote has spurred the university to lead the state in the development of its high-tech economy, especially in the information and communication, bioscience and biotechnology, and nano-technology sectors. President Mote has greatly expanded the university's partnerships with corporate and federal laboratories and successfully negotiated to bring to the College Park area the first Science Research Park sponsored by the People's Republic of China. Under his leadership, the University has established a research park, The University of Maryland Enterprise Campus, M-Square, located on a 115-acre site adjacent to the University of Maryland/College Park Metro with 3 million square feet of development potential. Among its first tenants are the Center for Advanced Study of Language, a joint venture of the University and Department of Defense, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's new World Weather and Climate Prediction Center. During President Mote's second year in office, the University began the largest building boom in its history, with more than $100 million in new projects breaking ground that year. New facilities address every aspect of university life, from the arts to recreation to classrooms and laboratories, and, in creative partnership with the private sector, new residential facilities. Highlights of the construction activity include the stunning Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center; the Comcast Center, a state of the art sports complex; a high-tech research greenhouse; and new classrooms for chemistry, computer science, business and engineering. President Mote also led the development of a new Facilities Master Plan for development in the next 20 years, which is noted for its emphasis on environmental stewardship.

OCR for page 131
142 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION Dr. Mote is a leader in the national dialogue on higher education and his analyses of shifting funding models have been featured in local and national media. He has testified on major educational issues before Congress, representing the University and higher education associations on the problem of visa barriers for international students and scholars and on deemed export control issues. He has been asked to serve on a high-level National Academies Committee appointed at the request of the Senate Energy Subcommittee of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to identify challenges to United States leadership in key areas of science and technology and to be a member of the Leadership Council of the National Innovation Initiative, an activity of the Council on Competitiveness. He has served as vice chair of the Department of Defense Basic Research Committee, and is a member of the Council of the National Academy of Engineering. In 2004-2005, he served as President of the Atlantic Coast Conference. In its last ranking in 2002, Washington Business Forward magazine counted him among the top 20 most influential leaders in the region. Prior to assuming the presidency at Maryland, Dr. Mote served on the University of California, Berkeley faculty for 31 years. From 1991 to 1998, he was vice chancellor at Berkeley, held an endowed chair in mechanical systems and was president of the UC Berkeley Foundation. He led a comprehensive capital campaign for Berkeley that raised $1.4 billion. He earlier served as chair of Berkeley's Department of Mechanical Engineering and led the department to its number one ranking in the National Research Council review of graduate program effectiveness. Dr. Mote's research lies in dynamic systems and biomechanics. Internationally recognized for his research on the dynamics of gyroscopic systems and the biomechanics of snow skiing, he has produced more than 300 publications, holds patents in the United States, Norway, Finland and Sweden, and has mentored 56 Ph.D. students. He received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. President Mote has received numerous awards and honors, including the Humboldt Prize awarded by the Federal Republic of Germany. He is a recipient of the Berkeley Citation, an award from the University of California-Berkeley similar to the honorary doctorate, and was named Distinguished Engineering Alumnus. He has received two honorary doctorates. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and serves on its Council, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was elected to Honorary Membership in the ASME International, its most distinguished recognition, and is a Fellow of the International Academy

OCR for page 131
143 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS of Wood Science, the Acoustical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In Spring 2005, he was named recipient of the 2005 J. P. Den Hartog award by the ASME International Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound to honor his lifelong contribution to the teaching and/or practice of vibration engineering. In Fall 2005, he received the 2005 Founders Award from the National Academy of Engineering in recognition of his comprehensive body of work on the dynamics of moving flexible structures and for leadership in academia. ROBIN NEWMARK Robin L. Newmark is director of the Strategic Energy Analysis Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Prior to joining NREL, Dr. Newmark was at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), where her research focused primarily on energy, environment and national security. In recent years, she has led or contributed to programs involving energy, climate and water issues, including the interdependence of water and energy systems, including a water initiative with components addressing the impacts of climate change on water resources, assessing denitrification in agricultural regions, and the development of energy-efficient, selective water treatment technologies. Dr. Newmark is an active member of the multi- national laboratory Energy-Water Nexus working group, the World Resources Institute Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Stakeholder Group and the U.S.-China Expert CCS Steering Committee. She is an author of over 50 papers, reports and patents, past vice president of the Near Surface Geophysics Section of the Society of Exploration Geophysicsts, past Associate Editor for Geophysics, and a Fellow of both the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute at the University of Colorado, Boulder and the Center of Integrated Water Research at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Dr. Newmark holds a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she was selected Phi Beta Kappa, a M.S. from the University of California at Santa Cruz, an M.Phil and a Ph.D from Columbia University. CHARLES VEST Charles M. Vest is president of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and president emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A professor of mechanical engineering at MIT and formerly at the University of Michigan, he served on the U.S. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology from 1994 to 2008, and chaired

OCR for page 131
144 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION the President’s Committee on the Redesign of the Space Station and the Secretary of Energy’s Task force on the Future of Science at DoE. He was a member of the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction and the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education. He was vice chair of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness for seven years, has served on the boards of DuPont and IBM, and was awarded the 2006 National Medal of Technology. He is the author of a book on holographic interferometry and two books on higher education. Constant themes throughout his career have included the quality and diversity of the U.S. engineering workforce; sustained excellence of U.S. higher education; global openness to the flow of people, education, and ideas; university-government-industry partnership; and the innovative capacity of the United States. Dr. Vest holds ten honorary doctorates and received the 2006 National Medal of Technology. REN WEIMIN Ren Weimin is currently serving as deputy director of the Academy of Macroeconomic Research at the National Development and Reform Commission. From 2003 to 2009, Mr. Ren served as deputy inspector in the Office of the National Development and Reform Commission. From 1998 to 2003, Mr. Ren served as director in the Office of Economic Restructuring, State Council; and deputy director of the Department of Secretarial and Administrative Affairs. From 1994 to 1998, Mr. Ren served as deputy director and duty office director, in the Department of Training, at the Office of the Commission for Economic Restructuring. Mr. Ren has worked for many years for state agencies in China in cadre training and administrative work. CHARLES WESSNER Charles Wessner is a National Academy Scholar and director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise on innovation policy, including public-private partnerships, entrepreneurship, early- stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high- technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. government and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the United States and

OCR for page 131
145 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign governments, universities, research institutes, and international organizations, often briefing government ministers and senior officials. He has a strong commitment to international cooperation, reflected in his work with a wide variety of countries around the world. Dr. Wessner's work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university-industry clusters, regional development, small-firm finance and public-private partnerships. His program at the National Academies also addresses policy issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-technology industries. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the development of new technologies and the cooperation between industry, universities, laboratories, and government to capitalize on a nation’s investment in research. Foremost among these is a congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2.3 billion award program for small companies and start-ups. He is also directing a major study on best practice in regional innovation programs, entitled Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State & Regional Innovation Initiatives. Today’s meeting on “Building the 21st Century: U.S.-China Cooperation on Science, Technology, and Innovation,” forms part of a complementary, global analysis entitled Comparative Innovation Policy: Best Practice in National Technology Programs. The overarching goal of Dr. Wessner’s work is to develop a better understanding of how we can bring new technologies forward to address global challenges in health, climate, energy, water, infrastructure, and security. ALAN WM. WOLFF Alan Wm. Wolff holds the position of distinguished research professor, Graduate School of International Policy, at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He also serves as Of Counsel at the international law firm of Dewey & LeBoeuf and leads the firm's International Trade Practice. He served as United States Deputy Special Representative for Trade Negotiations (1977-1979) in the Carter Administration, holding the rank of ambassador, after having served as General Counsel of the agency from 1974 to 1977. As Deputy Trade Representative, he played a key role in the formulation of American trade policy and its implementation. From 1968 to 1973, he was an

OCR for page 131
146 BUILDING THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S.-CHINA COOPERATION attorney dealing with international monetary, trade, and development issues at the Treasury Department. Ambassador Wolff is a member of the National Academies' Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP Board) from 1997 to present. He is a lifetime “National Associate” of the National Academies. Ambassador Wolff chairs the Academies’ Committee on Comparative Innovation Policy: Best Practice in National Technology Programs. Ambassador Wolff is Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Institute for Trade and Commercial Diplomacy; and is a member of the U.S. Department of State's Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy; the Advisory Committee of the Peterson Institute for International Economics; the Board of National Foreign Trade Council (NFTC); the United States Council for International Business; the Council on Foreign Relations, and the American Society of International Law. He is also a Board Member of the U.S.-China Legal Cooperation Fund and of the National Trade Council Foundation. He served on the Board of Trustees of Monterey Institute for International Studies from 1992 to 2001. Ambassador Wolff is recognized in Chambers USA - America's Leading Lawyers for Business as a leader in the field of International Trade and is recognized in Best Lawyers in America as a leader in the field of International Trade and Finance Law. Ambassador Wolff has co-authored books and published numerous papers on trade and U.S. trade law. He received his Juris Doctor degree from Columbia University and his B.A. from Harvard College. YANG XIANWU Yang Xianwu is currently serving as deputy director, Department of High Technology Development and Commercialization, at the Ministry of Science and Technology Joining the Ministry in 1986, Mr. Yang has worked in areas of science and technology planning, reform and restructuring, high-tech know-how transfer and commercialization. He took part in drafting China’s 9th, 10th, and 11th five-year national science and technology programs. Since 1998, Mr. Yang has been dedicated to high-tech commercialization, including development of national high-tech industry zones, high-tech business incubators, university high-tech parks, and center of productivity boosting. Mr. Yang is responsible for advancing R&D and commercialization of information technology and space technology.

OCR for page 131
147 APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS CHEN YING Chen Ying is currently serving as the deputy director of the Department of Software Service Industry of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology. Chen Ying started working in industry administration and policy research, enactment, and implementation in 1995. He has participated in the drafting and implementation stages of China’s most important software industry policies, such as encouraging software and integrated circuit industry development, promoting the Chinese software industry’s recent fast development, promoting Chinese software intellectual property right protection work, and promoting, organizing, and implementing the pre-installation of official operating systems in computers sold in China before leaving the factory.

OCR for page 131