C

Committee Biographies

DAVID H. WEGMAN, M.D., M.Sc., is professor emeritus in the School of Health and Environment at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Dr. Wegman was appointed professor and founding chair of the Department of Work Environment in 1987. He served a 5-year term as dean of the School of Health and Environment (2003-2008), after which he returned to the faculty until his retirement at the end of 2009. He continues to serve as adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his M.D. and M.Sc. from Harvard University; he is board-certified in preventive medicine (occupational medicine). Previously he served as director of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health and on the faculty at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Wegman has focused his research on epidemiologic studies of occupational respiratory disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and cancer and has published more than 200 articles in the scientific literature. He has also written on public health and policy issues concerning hazard and health surveillance, methods of exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies, the development of alternatives to regulation, and the use of participatory methods to study occupational health risks. He has served as chair of the National Research Council-Institute of Medicine (NRC-IOM) Committees on Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers and the Health and Safety Consequences of Child Labor, as well as the Committee to Review the NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) Research Programs. He has also been a member of the NRC-IOM Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders and Work, the IOM Committees to Review the Health Consequences of Service During the Persian Gulf War and to Review Gender Differ-



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C Committee Biographies DAVID H. WEGMAN, M.D., M.Sc., is professor emeritus in the School of Health and Environment at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Dr. Wegman was appointed professor and founding chair of the Department of Work Environment in 1987. He served a 5-year term as dean of the School of Health and Environment (2003-2008), after which he returned to the faculty until his retirement at the end of 2009. He con- tinues to serve as adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his M.D. and M.Sc. from Harvard University; he is board-certified in preventive medi- cine (occupational medicine). Previously he served as director of the Di- vision of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health and on the faculty at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Wegman has focused his research on epidemiologic studies of occupational respiratory disease, muscu- loskeletal disorders, and cancer and has published more than 200 articles in the scientific literature. He has also written on public health and policy issues concerning hazard and health surveillance, methods of exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies, the development of alternatives to regulation, and the use of participatory methods to study occupational health risks. He has served as chair of the National Research Council- Institute of Medicine (NRC-IOM) Committees on Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers and the Health and Safety Consequences of Child Labor, as well as the Committee to Review the NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) Research Programs. He has also been a member of the NRC-IOM Panel on Musculoskeletal Disord- ers and Work, the IOM Committees to Review the Health Consequences of Service During the Persian Gulf War and to Review Gender Differ- 69

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70 APPENDIX C ences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors. He is currently chair of the NRC Committee on External Evaluation of NIDRR (National Insti- tute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research) and Its Grantees. LAURA O. BRIGHTMAN, M.D., is an internist at Cambridge Health Alliance and clinical instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Brightman works at the Broadway Community Health Center and has been involved in a study to collect and record information about occupation and work-relatedness in its electronic health record system. Dr. Brightman received her M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. CURTIS L. COLE, M.D., is the chief information officer at Weill Cor- nell Medical College, where he is responsible for the core information services that support the research, clinical, education, and administrative functions of the college. Previously, as chief medical information officer he led the implementation of a new electronic medical record system. He is also actively involved in the development of computer systems that support Clinical Research and Terminology Services. Dr. Cole is a grad- uate of Bowdoin College and received his medical degree from Cornell University Medical College in 1994. He completed his internal medicine residency program at the New York Hospital in 1997. After residency Dr. Cole continued at New York-Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell as a clinical investigator in medical informatics. He also completed a course in leadership development of physicians in academic health centers in 1999 at Harvard University. In 2002, Dr. Cole participated in the Kellogg School of Business, Northwestern University, Executive Development Program. Dr. Cole has several active research projects including partici- pation in the national VIVO consortium. VIVO is a semantic web-based system to help researchers find one another though a national network. LETITIA K. DAVIS, Sc.D., EdM., is Director of the Occupational Health Surveillance Program in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health where she has worked for over 25 years to develop state-based surveillance systems for work-related illnesses and injuries. She has overseen the formation of a physician reporting system for occupational disease, the Massachusetts Occupational Lead Registry, a comprehensive surveillance system for fatal occupational injuries, the Massachusetts Sharps Injury Surveillance System, and a model surveillance system for work-related injuries to children and adolescents less than 18 years of age. She has conducted numerous surveillance research studies exploring

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71 APPENDIX C use of existing public health data sources to document work-related inju- ries and illnesses and is currently engaged in a project incorporating oc- cupational information in the electronic records systems of community health centers to improve documentation occupational health needs of underserved worker populations. She is also responsible for the devel- opment of prevention programs to address identified occupational health problems and advises the Department leadership on matters of occupa- tional health policy. Dr. Davis serves as adjunct faculty of the Depart- ment of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and as an instructor at the Harvard School of Public Health. She is also a lead consultant in occupational health to the Council of State and Terri- torial Epidemiologists and has played a leadership role nationally in the effort integrate occupational health into public health practice at the state level. She is a past member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health and currently serves on the national Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health. Dr. Davis received her doctorate in Occupational Health from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1983. ROBERT A. GREENES, M.D., is chair of the Department of Biomedi- cal Informatics at Arizona State University (ASU). Before coming to ASU, Dr. Greenes spent many years at Harvard, in the field of bio- medical informatics, first at Massachusetts General Hospital, then at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he established the Decision Sys- tems Group in 1980 and developed it into a leading biomedical informat- ics research and development program. Dr. Greenes was professor of radiology and of health sciences and technology at Harvard Medical School and professor of health policy and management at Harvard School of Public Health. For more than 20 years, he has directed the Biomedical Informatics Research Training Program, with support from the National Library of Medicine and other sources, with co-directors now representing 10 hospital and university-based informatics groups throughout the Boston area. Dr. Greenes is a practicing radiologist. His research has been in the areas of clinical decision support, in terms of models and approaches to decision making, the knowledge representa- tion to support it, and its clinical application and validation. He has also been active in the promulgation of standards and fostering of group col- laborative work, particularly in knowledge management. A related re- search interest is human-computer interaction, particularly with respect

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72 APPENDIX C to the use of clinical information systems by providers and patients, the improved capture of clinical data, and the incorporation of individua- lized, context-specific decision support. Dr. Greenes is a member of the IOM and served on the IOM Committee on New Approaches to Early Detection of Breast Cancer. LAWRENCE HANRAHAN, Ph.D., M.S., is chief epidemiologist and director of Public Health Informatics at the Wisconsin Division of Public Health. In this role, he oversees the development of epidemiologic in- formation systems by providing scientific leadership to integrate—on a secure web platform—statewide public health informatics, epidemiology, and surveillance programs. He has more than 31 years’ experience in directing and developing statewide electronic public health surveillance systems and epidemiologic investigations. His research interests include occupational and environmental health surveillance, epidemiologic in- vestigation, multivariate analysis, data mining, and public health infor- matics. He recently led a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded project to determine the information systems requirements for chronic disease surveillance, including the use of clinical electronic medical record data. He participates in several public health informatics forums, including the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials Public Health Informatics Policy Committee, the Public Health Data Standards Consortium, and the CSTE Informatics Team; he served on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Informatics Board of Scientific Counselors. He is an adjunct professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He has been with the Division of Public Health since 1979 and holds both a master of science and a doctorate degree in epi- demiology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. ROBERT HARRISON, M.D., M.P.H., is chief of the Occupational Health Surveillance Program of the California Department of Public Health and clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He lectures at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health on environmental diseases and teaches nursing and occupational medicine residents at UCSF. He founded the UCSF Occupational Health Services and was the medical director of the employee health services for many years. Dr. Harrison is the principal investigator of the NIOSH-CDC cooperative agreement for state-based occupational safety and health surveillance in California. He has con-

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73 APPENDIX C ducted numerous workplace investigations of work-related asthma, tu- berculosis, pesticide illness, carpal tunnel syndrome, workplace fatalities, and blood-borne pathogen exposures. Dr. Harrison received his M.D. degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and his M.P.H. de- gree from the University of California, Berkeley. He is board-certified in both internal medicine and occupational medicine. SUNDARESAN JAYARAMAN, Ph.D., is the Kolon Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering and in the College of Man- agement at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. He and his research students have made significant contributions in enterprise archi- tecture and modeling methodologies for information systems; engineer- ing design of intelligent textile structures and processes; and design and development of knowledge-based systems for textiles and apparel. His group’s research has resulted in the realization of the world’s first Wear- able Motherboard or Smart Shirt. He is currently engaged in studying the role of management and technology innovation in health care. He was involved in the design and development of TK!Solver, the first equation- solving program from Software Arts, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Jayaraman worked as a product manager at Software Arts, Inc., and at Lotus Development Corporation in Cambridge before joining Georgia Tech. Professor Jayaraman is a recipient of the 1989 Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation for his re- search in the area of computer-aided manufacturing and enterprise archi- tecture. He has served on several IOM and NRC committees, including the Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Work- ers During an Influenza Pandemic, the Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health, and the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. He received his B.Tech. and M.Tech. degrees from the University of Madras, India, and his Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. MATTHEW KEIFER, M.D., M.P.H., is senior research scientist and the Dean Emanuel Endowed Chair in Agricultural Medicine at the Marshfield Research Foundation in Wisconsin. He is a senior scientist with the National Farm Medicine Center and remains an affiliate profes- sor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of Washington. Dr. Keifer was formerly co-director of the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center, where he directed nu- merous community-based research projects that largely focused on

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74 APPENDIX C farmworker health and pesticides. Dr. Keifer is board-certified in internal medicine and occupational and environmental medicine. His clinical practice is conducted at the Occupational Medicine Clinic at the Marsh- field Clinic. Prior to joining the faculty at Washington, he was the re- gional pesticide epidemiologist in Leon, Nicaragua, from 1989 to 1991, supported by CARE International. Dr. Keifer received his medical train- ing at the University of Illinois and his M.P.H. from the University of Washington. CATHERINE STAES, B.S.N., M.P.H., Ph.D., is assistant professor of biomedical informatics in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Staes received her Ph.D. in medical informatics from the University of Utah in 2006, a master’s in public health from Johns Hopkins University in 1987, and a bachelor of science in nursing from Georgetown University in 1981. Dr. Staes was an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1990-1992), worked as a public health epidemi- ologist for 15 years, and has numerous publications concerning epidemi- ology and biomedical informatics. Currently, Dr. Staes’ research and teaching focus on the domain of public health informatics and the devel- opment of decision-support tools and applications to support surveillance and public health goals. Dr. Staes has broad experience as a public health epidemiologist and has performed research in environmental health (par- ticularly prevention of lead poisoning), communicable disease control, and injury control GEORGE STAMAS, M.Sc., is chief of the Division of Occupational Employment Statistics at the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in the U.S. Department of Labor. Mr. Stamas is responsible for the BLS Occu- pational Employment Statistics (OES) program, a large employer survey collecting data on employment and wages by occupation. He also serves on the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) Policy Committee.