TABLE B-3 Average Concentration (mg/m3) of the 12 Most Frequently Detected VOCs at JBB

Analyte Guard Tower/ Transportation Field H-6 Housing/CASF Mortar Pit
Spring 2007 Fall 2007 2009 Spring 2007 Fall 2007 2009 Spring 2007 Fall 2007 2009
Benzene 6.8 9.1 4.9 4.8 5.0 3.8 3.3 8.3 2.7
Acetone 37.9 10.8 29.6 25.7 9.4 42.7 13.8 6.8 29.7
Chloromethane 2.0 1.6 1.9 1.9 1.1 1.7 1.5 1.2 1.8
Dichlorodifluoromethane 4.3 2.5 2.5 3.0 2.6 2.6 2.7 2.3 2.5
Toluene 11.8 23.0 10.7 8.6 30.2 13.1 5.0 55.2 9.8
Hexane 5.1 4.5 5.3 2.9 5.4 31.6 2.1 16.2 7.2
Xylenes 7.2 22.4 7.7 9.6 18.3 8.9 4.6 52.6 6.4
Ethylbenzene 4.0 4.8 2.9 3.2 5.3 2.7 2.4 9.6 1.7
n-Heptane 3.6 2.9 2.1 4.1 3.5 2.8 1.8 6.5 1.9
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 2.6 18.0 2.0 3.7 9.3 2.9 2.2 11.9 1.8
Propylene 2.7 3.8 2.2 1.6 2.8 2.0 1.2 4.8 1.3
Methylene chloride 10.1 2.7 17.3 2.3 2.1 17.9 2.5 3.0 8.3
Number of samples 15 8 19 12 9 18 15 7 19

guard tower/transportation field, H-6 housing/CASF, and mortar pit locations, respectively, on 19 sampling days, with 3 different days missing a sample at one location (TO-9 method; 54 samples total). The concentrations measured in May and June of 2009 were consistently lower for all congeners, and at all measurement locations, than those measured in January, February, April, October, and November 2007, with a larger proportion of nondetects than in 2007 (206/918, 22%, versus 126/1173, 11%). Again, 1,2,3,7,8,9-hexaCDF was the most frequent nondetect (only 4/54 samples measurable).

CHPPM also provided the committee with PCDD/PCDF sample data for 9 samples collected on 9 dates in 2006, but no location for these samples was given. At JBB, the distributions of concentrations of total PCDD/Fs (the sum of the seventeen 2,3,7,8-chlorinated congener concentrations) and individual congeners at each location are approximately lognormal with high correlations between congeners. In the 2007 measurements, there is no significant difference in individual congeners or in total PCDD/F between the January–April and October–November measurements at each location, although there is a slight trend for the January–April concentrations to be higher than the October–November concentrations at the guard tower/transportation field and H-6 housing/CASF locations.

REFERENCES

ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry). 1998. Toxicological profile for chloromethane. Tox profiles. Atlanta, GA: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp.asp?id=587&tid=109 (accesed March 3, 2011)

EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 1990. Technical assistance document for sampling and analysis of toxic organic compounds in ambient air. Washington, DC: Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory.

NRC (National Research Council). 2010. Review of the Department of Defense Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Taylor, G., V. Rush, A. Peck, and J. A. Vietas. 2008. Screening health risk assessment burn pit exposures Balad Air Base, Iraq and addendum report. IOH-RS-BR-TR-2008-0001/USACHPPM 47-MA-08PV-08. Brooks City-Base, TX: Air Force Institute for Operational Health and U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine.



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