3
Ad Hoc Study Committees:
Activities and Membership

When a sponsor requests that the Space Studies Board (SSB) conduct a study, an ad hoc committee is established for that purpose. The committee terminates when the study is completed. These study committees are subject to the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Section 15, because they provide advice and recommendations to the federal government. The SSB and/or one of its standing committees provide oversight for ad hoc study committee activities. Twelve ad hoc study committees were organized, met, or released studies during 2010. (Activities and membership are summarized below.)

In addition, one ad hoc committee produced a report in 2009 and was formally disbanded in 2010—the report of the ad hoc Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Science Missions, An Enabling Foundation for NASA’s Earth and Space Science Missions, was summarized in the 2009 annual report.

Also in 2010, work began to form the Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs, an ad hoc committee to review the alignment of NASA’s Earth Science Division’s program with previous NRC advice, primarily the 2007 NRC decadal survey report, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond.

ASSESSING REQUIREMENTS FOR SUSTAINED OCEAN COLOR RESEARCH AND OPERATIONS

The Ocean Studies Board formed the ad hoc Committee on Assessing Requirements for Sustained Ocean Color Research and Operations, in collaboration with the SSB, to identify the ocean color data needs for a broad range of end users, develop a consensus for the requirements, and outline options to meet these needs on a sustained basis.

The committee held the following meetings: February 11-12 via teleconference; April 20-22, Keck Center, Washington D.C., June 28-30, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, Irvine, California; October 14, Keck Center, Washington D.C.; November 2-4, Keck Center, Washington D.C.; and December 7-9, Miami, Florida. Members of the SSB Committee on Earth Studies and SSB staff attended the June 28-30 meeting.

A report of the committee is expected to be released in Summer 2011.

Membership

James A. Yoder, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (chair)

David Antoine, Laboratoire d’Oceanographie de Villefranche

Carlos E. Del Castillo, Johns Hopkins University

Robert H. Evans, Jr., University of Miami

Curtis Mobley, Sequoia Scientific, Inc.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 22
3 Ad Hoc Study Committees: Activities and Membership When a sponsor requests that the Space Studies Board (SSB) conduct a study, an ad hoc committee is estab- lished for that purpose. The committee terminates when the study is completed. These study committees are sub- ject to the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Section 15, because they provide advice and recommendations to the federal government. The SSB and/or one of its standing committees provide oversight for ad hoc study committee activities. Twelve ad hoc study committees were organized, met, or released studies during 2010. (Activities and membership are summarized below.) In addition, one ad hoc committee produced a report in 2009 and was formally disbanded in 2010—the report of the ad hoc Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Science Missions, An Enabling Foundation for NASA’s Earth and Space Science Missions, was summarized in the 2009 annual report. Also in 2010, work began to form the Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs, an ad hoc committee to review the alignment of NASA’s Earth Science Division’s program with previous NRC advice, primarily the 2007 NRC decadal survey report, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. ASSESSING REQUIREMENTS FOR SUSTAINED OCEAN COLOR RESEARCH AND OPERATIONS The Ocean Studies Board formed the ad hoc Committee on Assessing Requirements for Sustained Ocean Color Research and Operations, in collaboration with the SSB, to identify the ocean color data needs for a broad range of end users, develop a consensus for the requirements, and outline options to meet these needs on a sustained basis. The committee held the following meetings: February 11-12 via teleconference; April 20-22, Keck Center, Washington D.C., June 28-30, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, Irvine, California; October 14, Keck Center, Washington D.C.; November 2-4, Keck Center, Washington D.C.; and December 7-9, Miami, Florida. Members of the SSB Committee on Earth Studies and SSB staff attended the June 28-30 meeting. A report of the committee is expected to be released in Summer 2011. Membership James A. Yoder, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (chair) David Antoine, Laboratoire d’Oceanographie de Villefranche Carlos E. Del Castillo, Johns Hopkins University Robert H. Evans, Jr., University of Miami Curtis Mobley, Sequoia Scientific, Inc. 22

OCR for page 22
23 Ad Hoc Study Committees Jorge L. Sarmiento, Princeton University Shubha Sathyendranath, Bedford Institute of Oceanography Carl F. Schueler, Raytheon Company (retired) David A. Siegel, University of California, Berkeley Cara Wilson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Staff Claudia Mengelt, Program Officer, Ocean Studies Board (study director) Arthur A. Charo, Senior Program Officer, SSB ASSESSMENT OF IMPEDIMENTS TO INTERAGENCY COOPERATION ON SPACE AND EARTH SCIENCE MISSIONS The ad hoc Committee on the Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Sci- ence Missions was formed to assess impediments, including cost growth, to the successful conduct of interagency cooperation on Earth science and space science missions; to identify lessons learned and best practices from past interagency Earth science and space science missions; and to recommend steps to help facilitate successful inter- agency collaborations on Earth science and space science missions. During the first half of 2010, the committee finalized its draft report, which entered external peer review in July. A prepublication version of the report, Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Collaboration on Space and Earth Science Missions, was issued in November and briefed to NASA officials and to staff of the House Science and Technology’s Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics. Further briefings are planned for the first quarter of 2011. The Executive Summary of this report is reproduced in Chapter 5 of this report. Membership D. James Baker, The William J. Clinton Foundation (co-chair) Daniel N. Baker, University of Colorado at Boulder (co-chair) David A. Bearden, The Aerospace Corporation Charles L. Bennett, Johns Hopkins University Stacey Boland, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr., University of Maryland, College Park Carlos E. Del Castillo, Johns Hopkins University Antonio L. Elias, Orbital Sciences Corporation Margaret Finarelli, George Mason University Todd R. La Porte, University of California, Berkeley Margaret S. Leinen, Climate Response Fund Scott N. Pace, George Washington University Graeme L. Stephens, Colorado State University Annalisa L. Weigel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Michael S. Witherell, University of California, Santa Barbara A. Thomas Young, Lockheed Martin Corporation (retired) Staff Arthur A. Charo, Senior Program Officer, SSB Joseph K. Alexander, Senior Program Officer, SSB Abigail A. Sheffer, Associate Program Officer, SSB Carmela J. Chamberlain, Administrative Coordinator, SSB Terri Baker, Senior Program Assistant, SSB

OCR for page 22
24 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 ASSESSMENT OF NASA LABORATORY CAPABILITIES Congress directed NASA to arrange for an independent assessment of NASA laboratory capabilities; as a result, the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Laboratory Assessments Board (LAB), in collaboration with the Aero- nautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) and SSB, formed the ad hoc Committee on Assessment of NASA Laboratory Capabilities to carry out a review of NASA’s laboratories to determine whether they are equipped and maintained at a level adequate to support NASA’s fundamental science and engineering research activities. The committee held its third and final meeting on January 18-19 to develop its final report. Consensus was achieved on February 23, and a draft report was submitted for NRC review on February 26. The final report, Capabilities for the Future: An Assessment of NASA Laboratories for Basic Research, was submitted to the sponsor, NASA, on April 28 and released to the public on May 11. Briefings were provided during the month of May to NASA, House and Senate staffers, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Office of Management and Budget. The report’s Summary is reprinted in Chapter 5. Membership John T. Best, U.S. Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center (co-chair) Joseph B. Reagan, Lockheed Martin Corporation (retired) (co-chair) William F. Ballhaus, Jr., The Aerospace Corporation (retired) Peter M. Banks, Astrolabe Ventures Ramon L. Chase, Booz Allen Hamilton Ravi B. Deo, EMBR Neil A. Duffie, University of Wisconsin, Madison Michael G. Dunn, Ohio State University Blair B. Gloss, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (retired) Marvine P. Hamner, LeaTech, LLC; George Washington University; Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute Wesley L. Harris, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Basil Hassan, Sandia National Laboratories Joan Hoopes, Orbital Technologies Corporation William E. McClintock, University of Colorado Edward D. McCullough, The Boeing Company (retired) Todd J. Mosher, Sierra Nevada Corporation Eli Reshotko, Case Western Reserve University John C. Sommerer,1 Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory James M. Tien, University of Miami Candace E. Wark, Illinois Institute of Technology Staff John F. Wendt, Senior Program Officer, ASEB (study director) James P. McGee, Director, LAB Arul Mozhi, Senior Program Officer, LAB Liza Hamilton, Administrative Coordinator, LAB Eva Labre, Program Associate, LAB ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS DECADAL SURVEY The SSB and the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA), initiated the astronomy and astrophysics decadal survey, Astro2010, to survey the field of space- and ground-based astronomy and astrophysics, recommend- ing priorities for the most important scientific and technical activities of the decade 2010-2020. The survey took place over 18 months and comprised two overlapping phases. The first phase was mostly concerned with establishing 1 Resigned from committee January 18, 2010.

OCR for page 22
25 Ad Hoc Study Committees a science program, fact-finding, and establishing a procedure for the second phase. The second phase was concerned with creating a prioritized, balanced, and executable series of research activities—that is, ground- and space-based research programs, projects, telescopes, and missions—that define the forefront of astronomy and astrophysics for the decade 2011-2020. The Astro2010 survey committee was assisted in its work by a series of nine panels addressing various topics— five science frontiers panels and four program prioritization panels. The survey committee was responsible for synthesizing the panel outputs, determining priorities and recommendations, and preparing the final report, which has two volumes (a main committee report and a volume that contains reports from the panels). During 2010, the nine panel reports went through the NRC’s peer-review process, and the survey committee held their last two (closed) meetings in January and February. The survey committee’s report entered NRC review in May. The main committee report, New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics, was released as a prepublication on August 13 and printed in December. The Executive Summary of New Worlds, New Horizons is reproduced in Chapter 5. The reports of the panels are contained in Panel Reports—New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics, which was released as a prepublication on August 30. The summaries of the panel reports are also reproduced in Chapter 5. Following release of the survey, the Office of Science and Technology Policy requested that the NRC convene a panel to consider whether NASA’s Euclid proposal is consistent with achieving the priorities, goals, and recom- mendations, and with pursuing the science strategy, articulated in the survey (see the section below entitled, “Imple- menting Recommendations from New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey”). Survey Committee Membership Roger D. Blandford, Stanford University (chair) Martha P. Haynes, Cornell University (vice chair) John P. Huchra, Harvard University (vice chair) Marcia J. Rieke, University of Arizona (vice chair) Lynne Hillenbrand, California Institute of Technology (executive officer) Steven J. Battel, Battel Engineering Lars Bildsten, University of California, Santa Barbara John E. Carlstrom, University of Chicago Debra M. Elmegreen, Vassar College Joshua Frieman, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Fiona A. Harrison, California Institute of Technology Timothy M. Heckman, Johns Hopkins University Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., University of Cambridge Jonathan I. Lunine, University of Arizona and University of Rome, Tor Vergata Claire E. Max, University of California, Santa Cruz Dan McCammon, University of Wisconsin Steven M. Ritz, University of California, Santa Cruz Juri Toomre, University of Colorado Scott D. Tremaine, Institute for Advanced Study Michael S. Turner, University of Chicago Neil deGrasse Tyson, Hayden Planetarium, American Museum of Natural History Paul A. Vanden Bout, National Radio Astronomy Observatory A. Thomas Young, Lockheed Martin Corporation (retired) Staff Donald C. Shapero, Director, BPA Michael H. Moloney, Director, SSB (study director) Robert L. Riemer, Senior Program Officer, BPA David Lang, Program Officer, BPA Teri Thorowgood, Administrative Coordinator, BPA

OCR for page 22
26 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 Carmela J. Chamberlain, Administrative Coordinator, SSB Caryn J. Knutsen, Research Associate, BPA Beth Dolan, Financial Associate, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences SCIENCE FRONTIERS PANELS Panel on Cosmology and Fundamental Physics Membership David N. Spergel, Princeton University (chair) David Weinberg, Ohio State University (vice chair) Rachel Bean, Cornell University Neil Cornish, Montana State University Jonathan Feng, University of California, Irvine Alex V. Filippenko, University of California, Berkeley Wick C. Haxton, University of California, Berkeley Marc P. Kamionkowski, California Institute of Technology Lisa Randall, Harvard University Eun-Suk Seo, University of Maryland David Tytler, University of California, San Diego Clifford M. Will, Washington University Panel on Galactic Neighborhood Membership Michael J. Shull, University of Colorado (chair) Julianne Dalcanton, University of Washington (vice chair) Leo Blitz, University of California, Berkeley Bruce T. Draine, Princeton University Robert Fesen, Dartmouth University Karl Gebhardt, University of Texas Juna Kollmeier, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington Crystal Martin, University of California, Santa Barbara Jason Tumlinson, Space Telescope Science Institute Daniel Wang, University of Massachusetts Dennis Zaritsky, University of Arizona Stephen Zepf, Michigan State University Panel on Galaxies across Cosmic Time Membership C. Megan Urry, Yale University (chair) Mitchell C. Begelman, University of Colorado (vice chair) Andrew J. Baker, Rutgers University Neta A. Bahcall, Princeton University Romeel Davé, University of Arizona Tiziana Di Matteo, Carnegie Mellon University Henric S.W. Krawczynski, Washington University Joseph Mohr, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Richard F. Mushotzky, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Chris S. Reynolds, University of Maryland Alice Shapley, University of California, Los Angeles Tommaso Treu, University of California, Santa Barbara Jaqueline H. van Gorkom, Columbia University Eric M. Wilcots, University of Wisconsin

OCR for page 22
27 Ad Hoc Study Committees Panel on Planetary Systems and Star Formation Membership Lee W. Hartmann, University of Michigan (chair) Dan M. Watson, University of Rochester (vice chair) Hector Arce, Yale University Claire Chandler, National Radio Astronomy Observatory David Charbonneau, Harvard University Eugene Chiang, University of California, Berkeley Suzan Edwards, Smith College Eric Herbst, Ohio State University David C. Jewitt, University of California, Los Angeles James P. Lloyd, Cornell University Eve C. Ostriker, University of Maryland David J. Stevenson, California Institute of Technology Jonathan C. Tan, University of Florida Panel on Stars and Stellar Evolution Membership Roger A. Chevalier, University of Virginia (chair) Robert Kirshner, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (vice chair) Deepto Chakrabarty, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Suzanne Hawley, University of Washington Jeffrey R. Kuhn, University of Hawaii Stanley Owocki, University of Delaware Marc Pinsonneault, Ohio State University Eliot Quataert, University of California, Berkeley Scott Ransom, National Radio Astronomy Observatory Hendrik Schatz, Michigan State University Lee Anne Willson, Iowa State University Stanford E. Woosley, University of California, Santa Cruz PROGRAM PRIORITIZATION PANELS Panel on Electromagnetic Observations from Space Membership Alan Dressler, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (chair) Michael Bay, Bay Engineering Innovations Alan P. Boss, Carnegie Institution of Washington Mark Devlin, University of Pennsylvania Megan Donahue, Michigan State University Brenna Flaugher, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Tom Greene, NASA Ames Research Center Puragra (Raja) GuhaThakurta, University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory Michael G. Hauser, Space Telescope Science Institute Harold McAlister, Georgia State University Peter F. Michelson, Stanford University Ben R. Oppenheimer, American Museum of Natural History Frits Paerels, Columbia University Adam Reiss, Johns Hopkins University George H. Rieke, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona Paul L. Schechter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Todd Tripp, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

OCR for page 22
28 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 Panel on Optical and Infrared Astronomy from the Ground Membership Patrick S. Osmer, Ohio State University (chair) Michael Skrutskie, University of Virginia (vice chair) Charles Bailyn, Yale University Betsy Barton, University of California, Irvine Todd A. Boroson, National Optical Astronomy Observatory Daniel Eisenstein, University of Arizona Andrea M. Ghez, University of California, Los Angeles J. Todd Hoeksema, Stanford University Robert P. Kirshner, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Bruce Macintosh, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Piero Madau, University of California, Santa Cruz John Monnier, University of Michigan Iain Neill Reid, Space Telescope Science Institute Charles E. Woodward, University of Minnesota Panel on Particle Astrophysics and Gravitation Membership Jacqueline N. Hewitt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (chair) Eric G. Adelberger, University of Washington Andreas Albrecht, University of California, Davis Elena Aprile, Columbia University Jonathan Arons, University of California, Berkeley Barry C. Barish, California Institute of Technology Joan Centrella, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Douglas Finkbeiner, Harvard University Kathy Flanagan, Space Telescope Science Institute Gabriela Gonzalez, Louisiana State University James B. Hartle, University of California, Santa Barbara Steven M. Kahn, Stanford University N. Jeremy Kasdin, Princeton University Teresa Montaruli, University of Wisconsin, Madison Angela V. Olinto, University of Chicago Rene A. Ong, University of California, Los Angeles Helen R. Quinn, SLAC National Laboratory (retired) Panel on Radio, Millimeter and Submillimeter from the Ground Membership Neal J. Evans, University of Texas (chair) James M. Moran, Harvard University (vice chair) Crystal Brogan, National Radio Astronomy Observatory Aaron S. Evans, University of Virginia Sarah Gibson, National Center for Atmospheric Research, High Altitude Observatory Jason Glenn, University of Colorado, Boulder Nickolay Y. Gnedin, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Cornelia C. Lang, University of Iowa Maura McLaughlin, West Virginia University Miguel Morales, University of Washington Lyman A. Page, Jr., Princeton University Jean L. Turner, University of California, Los Angeles David J. Wilner, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

OCR for page 22
29 Ad Hoc Study Committees COST GROWTH IN NASA EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE MISSIONS The ad hoc Committee on Cost Growth in NASA Earth and Space Science Missions was formed to review existing cost growth studies related to NASA space and Earth science missions and identify their key causes of cost growth and strategies for mitigating cost growth; assess whether those key causes remain applicable in the current environment and identifying any new major causes; and evaluate the effectiveness of current and planned NASA cost growth mitigation strategies and, as appropriate, recommend new strategies to ensure frequent mission opportunities. The committee met for the fourth and final time in Boulder, Colorado, on January 11-12 to focus on develop- ment of the final report. The draft report was submitted for NRC review in April. The final report, Controlling Cost Growth of NASA Earth and Space Science Missions, was released to the public on July 13. The report’s Summary is reprinted in Chapter 5. Membership Ronald M. Sega, Colorado State University (chair) Vassilis Angelopoulos, University of California, Los Angeles Allan V. Burman, Jefferson Consulting Group, LLC Olivier L. de Weck, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Robert E. Deemer, Regis University Larry W. Esposito, University of Colorado, Boulder Joseph Fuller, Jr., Futron Corporation Joseph W. Hamaker, Science Applications International Corporation Victoria E. Hamilton, Southwest Research Institute John M. Klineberg, Aerospace Consultant Bruce D. Marcus, TRW Inc. (retired) Emery I. Reeves, Independent Consultant William F. Townsend, Independent Consultant Staff Alan C. Angleman, Senior Program Officer, ASEB (study director) Andrea M. Rebholz, Program Associate, ASEB Linda Walker, Senior Project Assistant, SSB DECADAL STRATEGY FOR SOLAR AND SPACE PHYSICS (HELIOPHYSICS) The Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics) was formed to conduct a broadly based assessment decadal survey of the scientific priorities of the U.S. solar and space physics research enterprise for the period 2013-2022. During the first half of 2010, the NRC approved the study prospectus, agreement had been reached with agency sponsors regarding the survey’s terms of reference, and appointments to the various survey committees occurred. The survey is composed of a steering committee supported by three discipline-oriented study panels: the Panel on Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere Interactions, Panel on Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions, and the Panel on Solar and Heliospheric Physics. In addition, five “national capabilities working groups,” made up of community members who are willing to serve as unpaid consultants, assist the steering com- mittee and panels in gathering information and providing context to the survey’s work in the following focus areas: Theory and Modeling and Data Exploitation; Explorers, Suborbital, and Other Platforms; Innovations: Technology, Instruments, Data Systems; Research to Operations/Operations to Research; and Workforce and Education. The steering committee for the survey held its first meeting on September 1-3 at the National Academies’ Keck Center in Washington, D.C. At this meeting, the study panels and working groups were formed and planning occurred for several town hall events. During the third quarter of 2010, a solicitation to the community for mission concepts and related activities that might be undertaken in the coming decade drew 288 responses, all of which are posted on the survey’s Web site.

OCR for page 22
30 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 Representatives from the survey also conducted town hall meetings and outreach events at the University of Cali- fornia, Los Angeles; University of California, Berkeley; University of Maryland; National Center for Atmospheric Research; University of New Hampshire; University of Michigan; Arecibo Observatory; Southwest Research Institute; University of Texas, Dallas; and at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Upper Atmosphere Facilities Fall 2010 Meeting in Roanoke, Virginia. The final town hall event of 2010 occurred in December at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union. The three discipline-oriented study panels first met in November. The survey’s five cross-disciplinary working groups were constituted, and one—Theory, Modeling, and Data Exploitation—held a meeting in Boulder, Colorado. As the quarter ended, planning was underway for the 2011 meetings of the disciplinary panels and working groups and related events. Finally, many activities were underway in connection with the planned cost and technical evalu- ation of selected mission concepts. The final report of the committee is anticipated by the end of the first quarter of 2012. Steering Committee Membership Daniel Baker, University of Colorado, Boulder (chair) Thomas Zurbuchen, University of Michigan (vice chair) Brian H. Anderson, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Steven J. Battel, Battel Engineering James F. Drake, Jr., University of Maryland, College Park Lennard A. Fisk, University of Michigan Marvin Geller, State University of New York at Stony Brook Sarah Gibson, National Center for Atmospheric Research Michael A. Hesse, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center J. Todd Hoeksema, Stanford University David L. Hysell, Cornell University Mary K. Hudson, Dartmouth College Thomas Immel, University of California, Berkeley Justin Kasper, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Judith L. Lean, Naval Research Laboratory Ramon E. Lopez, University of Texas, Arlington Howard J. Singer, NOAA Space Weather Prediction center Harlan E. Spence, University of New Hampshire Edward C. Stone, California Institute of Technology Staff Arthur A. Charo, Senior Program Officer, SSB (study director) Maureen Mellody, Program Officer, ASEB Abigail Sheffer, Associate Program Officer, SSB Linda Walker, Senior Program Assistant, SSB Lewis Groswald, Research Associate, SSB Terri Baker, Senior Program Assistant, SSB Panel on Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere Interactions Membership Jeffrey M. Forbes, University of Colorado, Boulder (chair) James H. Clemmons, The Aerospace Corporation (vice chair) Odile de la Beaujardiere, Air Force Research Laboratory John V. Evans, COMSAT Corporation (retired) Roderick A. Heelis, University of Texas, Dallas Thomas Immel, University of California, Berkeley Janet U. Kozyra, University of Michigan

OCR for page 22
31 Ad Hoc Study Committees William Lotko, Dartmouth College Gang Lu, High Altitude Observatory Kristina A. Lynch, Dartmouth College Jens Oberheide, Clemson University Larry J. Paxton, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Robert F. Pfaff, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Joshua Semeter, Boston University Jeffrey P. Thayer, University of Colorado, Boulder Panel on Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions Membership Michelle F. Thomsen, Los Alamos National Laboratory (chair) Michael Wiltberger, National Center for Atmospheric Research (vice chair) Joseph Borovsky, Los Alamos National Laboratory Joseph F. Fennell, The Aerospace Corporation Jerry Goldstein, Southwest Research Institute Janet C. Green, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Donald A. Gurnett, University of Iowa Lynn M. Kistler, University of New Hampshire Michael W. Liemohn, University of Michigan Robyn Millan, Dartmouth College Donald G. Mitchell, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Tai D. Phan, University of California, Berkeley Michael Shay, University of Delaware Harlan E. Spence, University of New Hampshire Richard M. Thorne, University of California, Los Angeles Panel on Solar and Heliospheric Physics Membership Richard A. Mewaldt, California Institute of Technology (chair) Spiro K. Antiochos, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (vice chair) Timothy S. Bastian, National Radio Astronomy Observatory Joe Giacalone, University of Arizona George Gloeckler, University of Maryland, College Park John W. Harvey, National Solar Observatory Russell A. Howard, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Justin Kasper, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Robert P. Lin, University of California, Berkeley Glenn M. Mason, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Eberhard Moebius, University of New Hampshire Merav Opher, George Mason University Jesper Schou, Stanford University Nathan A. Schwadron, Boston University Amy Winebarger, Alabama A&M University Daniel Winterhalter, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Thomas N. Woods, University of Colorado, Boulder DECADAL SURVEY ON BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES IN SPACE The Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space was formed under the auspices of the SSB and the ASEB in response to a congressional request for a study to establish priorities and provide recommenda- tions for life and physical sciences space research, including research that will enable exploration missions in microgravity and partial gravity for the 2010-2020 decade. The decadal survey will define research areas, recom-

OCR for page 22
32 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 mend a research portfolio and a timeline for conducting that research, identify facility and platform requirements as appropriate, provide rationales for suggested program elements, define dependencies between research objec- tives, identify terrestrial benefits, and specify whether the research product directly enables exploration or produces fundamental new knowledge. These areas will be categorized as either those that are required to enable exploration missions or those that are enabled or facilitated because of exploration missions. The steering committee met on February 15-17, in Irvine, California, to begin the integration of the completed draft chapters from each of the panels, continue development of the steering committee chapters, and begin laying out an integrated research plan and priorities. Additional meetings of five of the study panels were held in the first quarter to gather additional information and complete drafts of individual chapters. All of the panels held discussions via e-mail and teleconference as integration of their chapters continued. The last town hall for the study was held in conjunction with the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics meeting in Orlando, Florida, on January 6. In early 2010, guidance was provided to NASA in the fiscal year 2011 presidential budget request that would extend the lifetime of the International Space Station (ISS) to 2020, which prompted NASA and the survey steer- ing committee to discuss the need for an interim report that would provide key, near-term input relevant to ISS and programmatic issues. Discussions and planning continued regarding the scope of the interim report and schedule of the final report. The steering committee met on March 31-April 2, in Irvine, California, to draft an interim report that would identify both organizational and management issues important to the success of the life and microgravity research enterprise at NASA and near-term research opportunities for the ISS. In developing this document, the committee relied heavily on inputs and analyses that had previously been collected or performed as part of the work on the full decadal survey. The steering committee continued work on the interim report following the meeting, and the final draft was submitted to external peer review in early May. Review and editing of the interim report were completed in June, and the interim report, Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era of Space Exploration: An Interim Report, was released to the public on July 14 (the interim report’s Summary is reprinted in Chapter 5). Co-chairs Betsy Cantwell and Wendy Kohrt briefed NASA and congressional staff in separate meetings. Following the completion of its work on the interim report, the committee returned its full attention to the final report and held its last report development meeting on July 28-30 in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The study panels also worked extensively throughout the third quarter of 2010 to complete work on issues raised by the steering committee. The completed report draft entered external review on September 16. The steering committee held its final meeting on October 14-15 at the Keck Center in Washington, D.C., to consider comments from the external reviewers of the decadal study. Although most of the reviews had not arrived by the requested date, based on early inputs the committee identified and discussed some overarching issues and recurrent themes, made plans for working with the panels to address the most prominent issues in the panel chapters, and developed preliminary feedback for a large number of the review comments. Most of the remaining comments from the 40 external reviewers had arrived by early November, at which time the committee and the panels began making integrated changes to the report. The comments were quite extensive, and work by the committee and panels continued through the remainder of this period, with completion of the review in early 2011 and final printing in July 2011. Steering Committee Membership Elizabeth R. Cantwell, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (co-chair) Wendy M. Kohrt, University of Colorado, Denver (co-chair) Lars Berglund, University of California, Davis Nicholas P. Bigelow, University of Rochester Leonard H. Caveny, Independent Consultant Vijay K. Dhir, University of California, Los Angeles Joel Dimsdale, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine Nikolaos A. Gatsonis, Worcester Polytechnic Institute Simon Gilroy, University of Wisconsin-Madison Benjamin D. Levine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Kathryn V. Logan, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

OCR for page 22
33 Ad Hoc Study Committees Philippa Marrack,2 National Jewish Health Gabor A. Somorjai, University of California, Berkeley Charles M. Tipton, University of Arizona Jose L. Torero, University of Edinburgh, Scotland Robert Wegeng, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Gayle E. Woloschak, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Staff Sandra J. Graham, Senior Program Officer, SSB (study director) Alan C. Angleman,3 Senior Program Officer, ASEB Ian W. Pryke, Senior Program Officer, SSB Robert L. Riemer,3 Senior Program Officer, BPA Maureen Mellody,3 Program Officer, ASEB Regina North, Consultant Lewis Groswald, Research Associate, SSB Danielle Johnson,3 Senior Program Assistant, Center for Economic, Governance, and International Studies Laura Toth,3 Senior Program Assistant, National Materials Advisory Board Linda M. Walker, Senior Program Assistant, SSB Eric Whittaker,3 Senior Program Assistant, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board Animal and Human Biology Panel Membership Kenneth M. Baldwin, University of California, Irvine (chair) François M. Abboud, University of Iowa, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine Peter R. Cavanagh, University of Washington V. Reggie Edgerton, University of California, Los Angeles Donna Murasko, Drexel University John T. Potts, Jr., Massachusetts General Hospital April E. Ronca, Wake Forest University School of Medicine Charles M. Tipton, University of Arizona Charles H. Turner,4 Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis Applied Physical Sciences Panel Membership Peter W. Voorhees, Northwestern University (chair) Nikolaos A. Gatsonis, Worcester Polytechnic Institute Richard T. Lahey, Jr., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Richard M. Lueptow, Northwestern University John J. Moore, Colorado School of Mines Elaine S. Oran, Naval Research Laboratory Amy L. Rechenmacher, University of Southern California James S. T’ien, Case Western Reserve University Mark M. Weislogel, Portland State University Fundamental Physics Panel Membership Robert V. Duncan, University of Missouri (chair) Nicholas P. Bigelow, University of Rochester Paul M. Chaikin, New York University __________________ 2 Through mid-May 2010. 3 Staff from other NRC boards who are assisting with the survey. 4 Deceased July 2010.

OCR for page 22
34 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 Ronald G. Larson, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor W. Carl Lineberger, University of Colorado, Boulder Ronald Walsworth, Harvard University Human Behavior and Mental Health Panel Membership Thomas J. Balkin, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (chair) Joel E. Dimsdale, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine Nick Kanas, University of California, San Francisco Gloria R. Leon, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Lawrence A. Palinkas, University of California, San Diego Integrative and Translational Research for the Human System Panel Membership James A. Pawelczyk, Pennsylvania State University (chair) Alan R. Hargens, University of California, San Diego Robert L. Helmreich, University of Texas, Austin (retired) Joanne R. Lupton, Texas A&M University, College Station Charles M. Oman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology David Robertson, Vanderbilt University Suzanne M. Schneider, University of New Mexico Gayle E. Woloschak, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Plant and Microbial Biology Panel Membership Terri L. Lomax, North Carolina State University (chair) Paul Blount, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Robert J. Ferl, University of Florida Simon Gilroy, University of Wisconsin-Madison E. Peter Greenberg, University of Washington School of Medicine Translation to Space Exploration Systems Panel Membership James P. Bagian, U.S. Air Force (chair) Frederick R. Best, Texas A&M University, College Station Leonard H. Caveny, Independent Consultant Michael B. Duke, Colorado School of Mines (retired) John P. Kizito, North Carolina A&T State University David Y. Kusnierkiewicz, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory E. Thomas Mahefkey, Jr., Heat Transfer Technology Consultants Dava J. Newman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Richard J. Roby, Combustion Science and Engineering, Inc. Guillermo Trotti, Trotti and Associates, Inc. Alan Wilhite, Georgia Institute of Technology NASA’S SUBORBITAL RESEARCH CAPABILITIES The ad hoc Committee on NASA’s Suborbital Research Capabilities conducted a study of suborbital flight activities, including the use of sounding rockets, aircraft (including the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy), balloons, and suborbital reusable launch vehicles, as well as opportunities for research, training, and education as set out in the 2007 NRC report Building a Better NASA Workforce: Meeting the Workforce Needs for the National Vision for Space Exploration.

OCR for page 22
35 Ad Hoc Study Committees A prepublication version of the committee’s report, Revitalizing NASA’s Suborbital Program: Advancing Science, Driving Innovation, and Developing Workforce, was delivered to NASA on February 4. Briefings for con- gressional staff and NASA management were well received. The final, printed version of the report was released in March. The report’s Summary is reprinted in Chapter 5. Membership Steven R. Bohlen, Texas A&M University (chair) Kristin A. Blais, The Boeing Company Mark A. Brosmer, The Aerospace Corporation Estelle Condon, NASA Ames Research Center (retired) Christine M. Foreman, Montana State University Adam P.-H. Huang, University of Arkansas Michael J. Kurylo III, Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center Robert P. Lin, University of California, Berkeley Franklin D. Martin, Martin Consulting Inc. R. Bruce Partridge, Haverford College Robert Pincus, RP Consultants W. Thomas Vestrand, Los Alamos National Laboratory Erik Wilkinson, Southwest Research Institute Staff Robert L. Riemer, Senior Program Officer, BPA (study director) Dwayne A. Day, Program Officer, SSB Linda M. Walker, Senior Project Assistant, SSB NEAR-EARTH OBJECT SURVEYS AND HAZARD MITIGATION STRATEGIES An ad hoc Committee on Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies was formed under the auspices of the SSB and ASEB to undertake a two-phase study to review two NASA reports, 2006 Near-Earth Object Survey and Detection Study and Near-Earth Object Survey and Deflection Analysis of Alternatives: Report to Congress, and other relevant literature and to provide recommendations that will address two major issues: (1) determining the best approach to completing the near-Earth object (NEO) census required by Congress to identify potentially hazardous NEOs larger than 140 meters in diameter by the year 2020 and (2) determining the optimal approach to developing a deflection strategy and ensuring that it includes a significant international effort. Both tasks included an assessment of the costs of various alternatives using independent cost estimating. Task 1 was addressed by the Survey/Detection Panel, and Task 2 was addressed by the Mitigation Panel. The committee’s interim report, Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies: Interim Report, was released in August 2009. The committee’s final report, Defending Planet Earth: Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies, was released to the public on January 22, 2010, and printed in final form in May 2010. Report briefings were held with NASA, congressional staff, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Office of Management and Budget. The final report’s Summary is reprinted in Chapter 5. Steering Group Membership Irwin I. Shapiro, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (chair) Michael A’Hearn, University of Maryland, College Park (vice chair) Faith Vilas, MMT Observatory at Mount Hopkins, Arizona (vice chair) Andrew F. Cheng, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Frank Culbertson, Jr., Orbital Sciences Corporation David C. Jewitt, University of California, Los Angeles Stephen Mackwell, Lunar and Planetary Institute

OCR for page 22
36 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 H. Jay Melosh, Purdue University Joseph H. Rothenberg, JHR Consulting Staff Dwayne A. Day, Program Officer, SSB (study director) Paul Jackson, Associate Program Officer, ASEB (study director) David H. Smith, Senior Program Officer, SSB Abigail A. Sheffer, Associate Program Officer, SSB Lewis Groswald, Research Associate, SSB Andrea M. Rebholz, Program Associate, ASEB Rodney N. Howard, Senior Program Assistant, SSB Survey/Detection Panel Membership Faith Vilas, MMT Observatory at Mount Hopkins, Arizona (chair) Paul Abell, Planetary Science Institute Robert F. Arentz, Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation Lance A.M. Benner, Jet Propulsion Laboratory William F. Bottke, Southwest Research Institute William E. Burrows, Independent Aerospace Writer and Historian Andrew F. Cheng, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Robert D. Culp, University of Colorado, Boulder Yanga Fernandez, University of Central Florida Lynne Jones, University of Washington Stephen Mackwell, Lunar and Planetary Institute Amy Mainzer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Gordon H. Pettengill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (retired) John Rice, University of California, Berkeley Mitigation Panel Membership Michael A’Hearn, University of Maryland, College Park (chair) Michael J.S. Belton, Belton Space Exploration Initiatives, LLC Mark Boslough, Sandia National Laboratories Clark R. Chapman, Southwest Research Institute Sigrid Close, Stanford University James A. Dator, University of Hawaii, Manoa David S.P. Dearborn, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Keith A. Holsapple, University of Washington David Y. Kusnierkiewicz, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Paulo Lozano, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Edward D. McCullough, The Boeing Company (retired) H. Jay Melosh, Purdue University David J. Nash, Dave Nash & Associates, LLC Daniel J. Scheeres, University of Colorado, Boulder Sarah T. Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Harvard University Kathryn C. Thornton, University of Virginia

OCR for page 22
37 Ad Hoc Study Committees PANEL ON IMPLEMENTING RECOMMENDATIONS FROM NEW WORLDS NEW HORIZONS DECADAL SURVEY Following release of the Astro2010 survey report, the Panel on Implementing Recommendations from New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey was formed to respond to the Office of Science and Technology Policy request that the NRC convene a panel to consider whether NASA’s Euclid proposal is consistent with achieving the priorities, goals, and recommendations, and with pursuing the science strategy, articulated in the survey. The panel also investigated what impact such participation might have on the prospects for the timely realization of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope mission and other activities recommended by the Astro2010 survey in view of the projected budgetary situation. The panel convened a workshop on November 7, 2010, and a prepublication version of the panel’s report, Report of the Panel on Implementing Recommendations from the New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey, was released in December. The report’s Summary is reprinted in Chapter 5. A printed report is expected in June 2011. Membership Adam S. Burrows, Princeton University (co-chair) Charles F. Kennel, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego (co-chair) Alan Dressler, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Debra M. Elmegreen, Vassar College Fiona A. Harrison, California Institute of Technology Lynne Hillenbrand, California Institute of Technology Steven M. Ritz, University of California, Santa Cruz A. Thomas Young, Lockheed Martin Corporation (retired) Staff Donald C. Shapero, Director, BPA Michael H. Moloney, Director, SSB David B. Lang, Program Officer, BPA (study director) Caryn J. Knutsen, Associate Program Officer, BPA Teri Thorowgood, Administrative Coordinator, BPA Beth Dolan, Financial Associate, BPA PLANETARY PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR ICY BODIES IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM The ad hoc Committee on Planetary Protection Standards for Icy Bodies in the Solar System was established in September, following formal NRC project approval in July and arrival of NASA funding in August. The study will develop and recommend planetary protection standards for future spacecraft missions, including orbiters, landers, and subsurface probes, to the icy bodies in the outer solar system (asteroids, satellites, Kuiper belt objects, and comets) in light of current scientific understanding and ongoing improvements in mission-enabling capabilities and technologies. The committee’s meetings will begin in 2011. The report is scheduled for delivery to NASA in early 2012. Membership Mitchell L. Sogin, Marine Biological Laboratory (chair) Geoffrey Collins, Wheaton College (vice chair) Amy Baker, Technical Administrative Services John A. Baross, University of Washington Amy C. Barr,5 Southwest Research Institute __________________ 5Appointed to the committee in January 2011.

OCR for page 22
38 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 William V. Boynton, University of Arizona Charles S. Cockell, Open University Michael J. Daly, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Joseph R. Fragola, Valador, Inc. Rosaly M. Lopes, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Kenneth H. Nealson, University of Southern California Douglas S. Stetson, Space Science and Exploration Consulting Group Mark H. Thiemens, University of California, San Diego Staff David H. Smith, Senior Program Officer, SSB (study director) Joseph K. Alexander, Senior Program Officer, SSB Rodney N. Howard, Senior Program Assistant, SSB PLANETARY SCIENCES DECADAL SURVEY The Planetary Sciences Decadal Survey was established to develop a comprehensive science and mission strategy for planetary science that updates and extends the 2003 solar system exploration decadal survey, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy. The new decadal survey is designed to broadly canvas the planetary science community to determine the current state of knowledge and then identify the most important scientific questions expected to face the community during the interval 2013-2022. This 2-year study at the request of NASA and NSF began in 2009 with the appointment and meetings of the steering group and panels and extensive outreach activities. To assist its activities, the decadal survey commissioned mission studies to be undertaken at the Applied Physics Laboratory, Goddard Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In a related activity, the decadal survey has engaged the services of the Aerospace Corporation to provide independent cost and technical evaluations of the highest-priority mission concepts resulting from these studies. Committee and panel meetings and community outreach activities continued in 2010. The steering group met in Irvine, California, on February 22-24. Members of the panels and steering group participated in a community- outreach event at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, in The Woodlands, Texas, on March 1-5. The panels held their final meetings to discuss and finalize their sections for the report on the following dates: Satellites, April 12-14, Boulder, Colorado; Mars, April 14-16, Boulder, Colorado; Inner Planets, April 21-23, Boulder, Colorado; Primitive Bodies, April 26-28, Knoxville, Tennessee; and Giant Planets, May 5-7, Boston, Massachusetts. The steering committee held its final two meetings in Washington, D.C., on July 13-15 and August 3-4 to continue its work on integrating the panel findings into a final draft report for submission to review. The report draft entered review in October, and the committee responded to nearly 1,600 comments from 18 reviewers. The decadal survey’s report, Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022, was delivered to NASA and NSF in prepublication form in late February 2011 and was released to the public on March 7 at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in The Woodlands, Texas. Steering Group Membership Steven W. Squyres, Cornell University (chair) Laurence A. Soderblom, U.S. Geological Survey (vice chair) Wendy M. Calvin, University of Nevada, Reno Dale Cruikshank, NASA Ames Research Center Pascale Ehrenfreund, George Washington University G. Scott Hubbard, Stanford University Margaret G. Kivelson, University of California, Los Angeles B. Gentry Lee, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jane Luu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Laboratory Stephen Mackwell, Lunar and Planetary Institute

OCR for page 22
39 Ad Hoc Study Committees Ralph L. McNutt, Jr., Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Harry Y. McSween, Jr., University of Tennessee, Knoxville George A. Paulikas, The Aerospace Corporation (retired) Amy Simon-Miller, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center David J. Stevenson, California Institute of Technology A. Thomas Young, Lockheed Martin Corporation (retired) Staff David H. Smith, Senior Program Officer, SSB (study director) Dwayne A. Day, Program Officer, SSB Abigail Sheffer, Associate Program Officer, SSB Dionna Williams, Program Associate, SSB Lewis Groswald, Research Associate, SSB Rodney N. Howard, Senior Program Assistant, SSB Satellites Panel Membership6 John Spencer, Southwest Research Institute (chair) David J. Stevenson, California Institute of Technology (vice chair) Glenn Fountain, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Caitlin Ann Griffith, University of Arizona Krishan Khurana, University of California, Los Angeles Christopher P. McKay, NASA Ames Research Center Francis Nimmo, University of California, Santa Cruz Louise M. Prockter, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Gerald Schubert, University of California, Los Angeles Thomas R. Spilker, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Elizabeth P. Turtle, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Hunter Waite, Southwest Research Institute Giant Planets Panel Membership6 Heidi B. Hammel, Space Science Institute (chair) Amy Simon-Miller, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (vice chair) Reta F. Beebe, New Mexico State University John R. Casani, Jet Propulsion Laboratory John Clarke, Boston University Brigette Hesman, University of Maryland William B. Hubbard, University of Arizona Mark S. Marley, NASA Ames Research Center Philip D. Nicholson, Cornell University R. Wayne Richie, NASA Langley Research Center (retired) Kunio M. Sayanagi, California Institute of Technology Inner Planets Panel Membership6 Ellen R. Stofan, Proxemy Research (chair) __________________ 6 Except for the chair and vice chair, all terms ended by October 2010.

OCR for page 22
40 Space Studies Board Annual Report—2010 Stephen Mackwell, Lunar and Planetary Institute (vice chair) Barbara A. Cohen, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Martha S. Gilmore, Wesleyan University Lori Glaze, Proxemy Research David H. Grinspoon, Denver Museum of Nature and Science Steven A. Hauck II, Case Western Reserve University Ayanna M. Howard, Georgia Institute of Technology Charles K. Shearer, University of New Mexico Douglas S. Stetson, Space Science and Exploration Consulting Group Edward M. Stolper, California Institute of Technology Allan H. Treiman, Lunar and Planetary Institute Mars Panel Membership7 Philip R. Christensen, Arizona State University (chair) Wendy M. Calvin, University of Nevada, Reno (vice chair) Raymond E. Arvidson, Washington University Robert D. Braun,8 Georgia Institute of Technology Glenn E. Cunningham, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (retired) David Des Marais,9 NASA Ames Research Center Linda T. Elkins-Tanton, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Francois Forget, University of Paris John P. Grotzinger, California Institute of Technology Penelope King, University of New Mexico Philippe Lognonne, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris Paul R. Mahaffy, Goddard Institute for Space Studies Lisa M. Pratt, Indiana University Primitive Bodies Panel Membership7 Joseph F. Veverka, Cornell University (chair) Harry Y. McSween, Jr., University of Tennessee, Knoxville (vice chair) Erik Asphaug, University of California, Santa Cruz Michael E. Brown, California Institute of Technology Donald E. Brownlee, University of Washington Marc Buie, Southwest Research Institute Timothy J. McCoy, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History Marc D. Rayman, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edward Reynolds, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory Mark Sephton, Imperial College London Jessica Sunshine, University of Maryland, College Park Faith Vilas, MMT Observatory 7 Exceptfor the chair and vice chair, all terms ended by October 2010. 8 Term ended February 8, 2010. 9 Term ended August 1, 2010.