Appendix E

Committee Biosketches

Robert R. Bass, M.D. (Chair), is executive director of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). Dr. Bass received his undergraduate and medical degrees with honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1972 and 1975, respectively. Prior to completing his undergraduate education, he was employed as a police officer in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and served as a volunteer member of the South Orange Rescue Squad. Dr. Bass completed an internship and residency in the U.S. Navy. He is board certified in emergency medicine and is a life fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He has served as a medical director for emergency medical services (EMS) systems in Charleston, South Carolina; Houston, Texas; Norfolk, Virginia; and Washington, DC. He has been executive director of MIEMSS, the state agency responsible for oversight of Maryland’s EMS and trauma system, since 1994. He is a clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. Dr. Bass is past president of the National Association of State EMS Officials and the National Associationof EMS Physicians, and past chair of the EMS Committee of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System. He currently serves as chair of the Atlantic EMS Council and is a member of the board of directors of the American Trauma Society.

Tia Powell, M.D. (Vice Chair), is director of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Bioethics and professor of clinical epidemiology and clinical psychiatry



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 319
Appendix E Committee Biosketches Robert R. Bass, M.D. (Chair), is executive director of the Maryland Insti- tute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). Dr. Bass received his undergraduate and medical degrees with honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1972 and 1975, respectively. Prior to completing his undergraduate education, he was employed as a police officer in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and served as a volunteer member of the South Orange Rescue Squad. Dr. Bass completed an internship and residency in the U.S. Navy. He is board certified in emergency medicine and is a life fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He has served as a medical director for emergency medical services (EMS) systems in Charleston, South Carolina; Houston, Texas; Norfolk, Virginia; and Washington, DC. He has been executive director of MIEMSS, the state agency responsible for oversight of Maryland’s EMS and trauma system, since 1994. He is a clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. Dr. Bass is past president of the National Association of State EMS Officials and the National Association of EMS Physicians, and past chair of the EMS Committee of the Ameri- can College of Emergency Physicians. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System. He currently serves as chair of the Atlantic EMS Council and is a member of the board of directors of the American Trauma Society. Tia Powell, M.D. (Vice Chair), is director of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Bioethics and professor of clinical epidemiology and clinical psychiatry 319

OCR for page 319
320 PREPOSITIONING ANTIBIOTICS FOR ANTHRAX at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Montefiore Medical Center. She served from 2004 to 2008 as executive director of the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law and from 1992 to 1998 as director of clini- cal ethics at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. Dr. Powell is a graduate of Harvard-Radcliffe College and Yale Medical School. She performed her psychiatric internship, her residency, and a fellowship in consultation-liaison psychiatry at Columbia University, College of Physi- cians and Surgeons, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. She is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and of the New York Academy of Medicine and a member of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities. In 2007 she co-chaired the New York State Department of Health’s work group to develop guidelines for allocating ventilators during an influenza pandemic. Margaret L. Brandeau, Ph.D., is Coleman F. Fung professor of engineer- ing and professor of medicine (by courtesy) at Stanford University. She holds a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a Ph.D. in engineer- ing-economic systems from Stanford. She is an operations researcher and policy analyst with extensive background in the development of applied mathematical and economic models, and a distinguished investigator in HIV. Among other awards, Professor Brandeau has received the President’s Award from the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) for contributions to the welfare of society, the Pierskalla Prize from INFORMS for research excellence in health care management science, a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foun- dation, the Department of Management Science and Engineering Graduate Teaching Award, and the Eugene L. Grant Faculty Teaching Award. She is a Fellow of INFORMS. Professor Brandeau has published numerous articles in areas of applied operations research and policy analysis; co-edited the books Modeling the AIDS Epidemic: Planning, Policy, and Prediction and Operations Research in Health: A Handbook of Methods and Applica- tions; and has served as principal investigator on a broad range of funded research projects. She has served on the board of several journals, including Operations Research, Management Science, and Health Care Management Science. Her HIV research focuses on using mathematical and economic models to assess the value of different HIV and drug abuse interventions, both in the United States and abroad. Recently, she has studied policies for control of hepatitis B both in the United States and abroad, as well as preparedness planning for potential bioterror attacks. Brad Brekke, J.D., M.A.T.S., has been vice president of Assets Protection for Target Corporation since 2001, leading a diverse team of executives in

OCR for page 319
321 APPENDIX E a comprehensive effort to mitigate risk, minimize loss and business disrup- tion, and provide a safe and secure environment for Target and the com- munities it serves. Under Mr. Brekke’s leadership, Target Assets Protection has developed strategic partnerships with law enforcement, emergency management, and public health organizations to continue to enhance the company’s strong commitment to public safety and preparedness. Specifi- cally, through the premiere, innovative public-private partnership Target & BLUE, Target shares expertise and resources with local, state, and federal law enforcement, building critical relationships that help make Target and its surrounding communities safer places to live and work. This includes partnering with organizations such as the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the U.S. Department of Justice Community Oriented Polic- ing Services, and the Police Executive Research Forum to develop innova- tive solutions to public safety challenges. Mr. Brekke serves on a number of boards and foundations, including the International Association of Chiefs of Police Foundation, the Overseas Security Advisory Council for the State Department, the International Security Management Association, the Na- tional Cyber-Forensics and Training Alliance, the Security Executive Coun- cil, and the Conference Board Council of Corporate Security Executives. A licensed attorney, Mr. Brekke formerly practiced in a Minneapolis law firm. Previously, he served as a special agent with the FBI, investigating complex cases involving financial fraud and public corruption. He received his B.A. from the University of Minnesota, his M.A.T.S. from Bethel Seminary, and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School. Robert L. Burhans recently retired as director of health emergency pre- paredness for the New York State Department of Health (DOH). With 32 years of public health experience, Mr. Burhans was director of the state’s Office of Health Emergency Preparedness, which coordinated DOH’s com- prehensive all-hazards preparedness and response activities, including in- tegrating local health departments and the health care system in readiness activities. He was DOH’s primary preparedness liaison with other federal, state, and local agencies and key community partners. He also served on the state Office of Homeland Security’s Executive Committee and was DOH’s representative to the state’s Disaster Preparedness Commission. In addi- tion, he served as chair of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials’ Directors of Public Health Preparedness Executive Committee. Mr. Burhans earned a B.A. in biological science from the State University of New York, New Paltz, and completed graduate-level coursework at the Nelson A. Rockefeller School of Public Administration and the State Uni- versity of New York at Albany School of Public Health. He is a graduate of the School of Public Health’s Northeast Public Health Leadership Insti- tute and has completed the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at

OCR for page 319
322 PREPOSITIONING ANTIBIOTICS FOR ANTHRAX Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and School of Public Health. He currently is a consultant in health emergency prepared- ness, management, and response. Louis Anthony (Tony) Cox, Jr., Ph.D., is president of Cox Associates, a Denver-based applied research company specializing in health risk analysis, statistics, and operations research. From 1987 to 1996, Dr. Cox led busi- ness and engineering modeling for US WEST Advanced Technologies in Boulder, Colorado. Dr. Cox holds a Ph.D. in risk analysis (1986) and an S.M. in operations research (1985), both from MIT’s Department of Elec- trical Engineering and Computer Science. He holds an A.B. from Harvard University (economics) and is a graduate of the Stanford Executive Program (1993). Dr. Cox is honorary full professor of mathematics at the University of Colorado at Denver, where he has lectured on biomathematics and health risk modeling, computational statistics, and machine learning. He is also clinical professor of preventive medicine and biometrics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He is a member of INFORMS and the American Statistical Association and a fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis. His current research interests center on computational statistical methods for causal inference and modeling problems arising in risk analysis and data mining of customer and epidemiological databases. Robert S. Hoffman, M.D., is associate professor of emergency medicine and medicine (clinical pharmacology) for the New York University School of Medicine and director, New York City Poison Control Center, as well as attending physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Bellevue Hospital Center. Dr. Hoffman received a B.A. in chemistry from Brandeis University in 1980 and immediately entered New York University School of Medicine, where he received his medical degree. He completed a 3-year internship and residency in internal medicine, also at the New York Uni- versity School of Medicine, followed by a fellowship in medical toxicology at the New York City Poison Control Center/Bellevue Hospital Center. He subsequently achieved board certification in internal medicine, medi- cal toxicology, and emergency medicine. In 1989 Dr. Hoffman became director of the Fellowship in Medical Toxicology at the New York City Poison Control Center, and in 1994 he became director of the center. He has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications in various aspects of toxicology that include basic science, animal, and clinical investigations. He has also authored numerous textbook chapters for major references in medicine and emergency medicine. He lectures around the world on vari- ous aspects of toxicology and has helped establish poison control centers in both Europe and Asia. Dr. Hoffman has held office in all three American toxicology societies, including being a member of the board of trustees of

OCR for page 319
323 APPENDIX E the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology and current president elect; a member of the board of directors of the American Association of Poison Control Centers; and secretary/treasurer, vice president, and president of the American College of Medical Toxicology. Daniel Lucey, M.D., M.P.H., is adjunct professor of microbiology and immunology at the Georgetown University Medical Center, where he has taught graduate students in the Biohazardous Threat Agents and Emerging Infectious Diseases program since its founding in 2004. During this time, he has also worked on biopreparedness for the Department of Emergency Medicine EROne Institute of the Washington Hospital Center in Washing- ton, DC (www.BePast.org). He has written on inhalation anthrax issues in particular, devising a new clinical staging system and advocating stock- piling of assets in anticipation of the need for mandatory pleural drainage. Dr. Lucey earned his B.A. at Dartmouth College; an M.D. at Dartmouth Medical School, where he was in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society; and his master of public health (M.P.H.) at the Harvard School of Public Health. In 2004 he coordinated the start of the Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI) in Washington, DC, while serving as interim chief health of- ficer at the DC Department of Health. His awards include the Walter Reed Medal for his role in Washington’s preparedness and response to anthrax bioterrorism (2001); the Commander’s Award for Public Service (2002) from the Department of the Army for hospital care of persons injured at the Pentagon on September 11, 2001; and a Distinguished Service Award from the District of Columbia Hospital Association for Bioterrorism Prepared- ness (2003). From 1998 to 2002, Dr. Lucey served as director, Infectious Disease Service, at the Washington Hospital Center. Earlier he served in the U.S. Public Health Service at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), where he was a medical reviewer for biodefense vaccines, and at the Na- tional Institutes of Health (NIH), where he served as attending physician on the Infectious Disease consult service for 3 years. Kevin Massey, M.Div., is director of Lutheran Disaster Response, a col- laborative program of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. He received a bachelor of arts de- gree with distinction in linguistics from the University of Wisconsin and completed his master of divinity degree at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. Rev. Massey is an ordained pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and a board-certified chaplain with the Association of Professional Chaplains. He was a chaplain and spiritual care trainer and coordinator with Advocate Health Care in Chicago from 1999 to 2005. He has also worked extensively in the field of disaster spiritual care administra- tion and training with the American Red Cross and Church World Service,

OCR for page 319
324 PREPOSITIONING ANTIBIOTICS FOR ANTHRAX including service at Ground Zero in the fall of 2001 and in response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Rev. Massey was assistant director of domestic disaster response for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America from 2005 to 2007 and has been director of Lutheran Disaster Response since 2007. In 2009 he served as a member of the Community Core Commit- tee, supporting the development of the National Health Security Strategy. Rev. Massey currently serves as vice president of the board of directors for National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster and has written extensively on such diverse topics as spiritual care, clinical ethics, pan- demic influenza preparedness, disaster response, linguistics, archaeology, and interreligious dialogue. Erin Mullen, R.Ph., Ph.D., CEM, is assistant vice president, Rx Response, for the Pharmaceutical Researchers and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA). She is responsible for overseeing and managing the Rx Response program, an information-sharing forum comprising pharmaceutical manufacturers, distributors, pharmacies, hospitals, disaster relief agencies, and state/federal government agencies that helps support the continuing provision of medi- cines to patients whose health is threatened by a severe public health emer- gency. Rx Response engages during a severe natural disaster, large-scale terrorist attack, or pandemic that disrupts the normal supply of medicines. Dr. Mullen is co-chair of the Healthcare Sector Coordinating Council, the private-sector body representing health care in matters related to critical infrastructure protection and emergency response. Prior to leading Rx Response, she was the first public health preparedness pharmacist for the Florida Department of Health and practiced pharmacy in a variety of set- tings: as a community pharmacist, clinical adjunct faculty with the Colleges of Pharmacy at the University of Florida and Florida A&M University, and disaster responder. Dr. Mullen graduated from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy with a B.S. in pharmacy. She earned her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Miami. Joanne M. Nigg, Ph.D., is professor of sociology and former director of the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware. She is currently co- ordinator of the emergency and environmental management concentration for sociology majors, a core faculty member of the graduate program in disaster science and management, and a core faculty member of the Disaster Research Center. Dr. Nigg earned her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1979. Her areas of expertise include societal response to natural, technological, and environmental hazards and disas- ters. She headed a multidisciplinary team that conducted a congressionally required public risk assessment for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. She was also a member of the

OCR for page 319
325 APPENDIX E Research Committee (which set the cross-disciplinary research agendas) for the National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research. Dr. Nigg has been involved in several federal reviews of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program and has twice given testimony before Congress on the reauthorization of that program. She has served on a variety of federal commissions and task forces on disaster policies and has been a member of the National Re- search Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Natural Disasters, as well as the NRC’s Committee on Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Nigg was the first woman and social scientist to serve as president of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. She also served on the Division Review Committee for the Environment and Energy Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory, where she held a Q clearance. Dr. Nigg is the author, co-author, or editor of 7 books and more than 100 articles, book chapters, reports, and papers on individual, organizational, and governmental response to, preparation for, mitigation of, and recovery from natural and technological threats and disasters. She is currently coordinating a team of researchers looking at policy and health issues associated with the BP oil blowout in the Gulf of Mexico. Herminia Palacio, M.D., M.P.H., is executive director of Harris County [Texas] Public Health and Environmental Services (HCPHES), the local health department for approximately 1.8 million people. Dr. Palacio re- ceived her medical degree from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, where she was also inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. She completed her residency training at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Primary Care Internal Medicine Pro- gram at San Francisco General Hospital. After becoming a board-certified internist, she obtained an M.P.H., with an emphasis in epidemiology, from the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health. Dr. Palacio spent several years on the faculty of UCSF, where she served as principal investigator or co-investigator for several federally funded and private foundation HIV epidemiology and health services research studies. She is the author of numerous articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and was featured in a permanent exhibit entitled AIDS: The War Within established by the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry in 1994. She currently holds faculty appointments at the Baylor College of Medicine and the Uni- versity of Texas School of Public Health. In 2009 she was appointed to the National Advisory Committee of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program. Dr. Palacio provides oversight for a wide variety of public health emergency responses. For example, she served as medical branch director for the Astrodome/Reliant Park mega-shelter operation for more than 27,000 evacuees during Hurricane Katrina and as incident

OCR for page 319
326 PREPOSITIONING ANTIBIOTICS FOR ANTHRAX commander for the public health response to many infectious disease and environmental incidents, and she is currently tasked with playing a lead role in local pandemic influenza preparedness planning. She was also a member of the steering committee for the Medical Countermeasure Public Engage- ment Initiative, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Andrew Pavia, M.D., is George and Esther Gross presidential professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Pavia is chief of pediatric infectious diseases and professor of pediatrics and medicine at the Univer- sity of Utah. His research focuses on the epidemiology and management of respiratory infections, including seasonal and pandemic influenza, pneumo- coccal disease, antibiotic-resistant organisms, and respiratory viral infec- tions. He has served on the National Vaccine Advisory Committee and the National Biodefense Science Board and is also a member of the board of di- rectors of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Dr. Pavia received his M.D. at Brown University, then completed a residency in internal medicine and served as chief resident at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He was an officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, and completed a residency in preventive medicine, also at CDC. He completed his training in infectious diseases at the University of Utah. Stephen M. Pollock, Ph.D., is Herrick emeritus professor of manufacturing and professor emeritus of industrial and operations engineering at the Uni- versity of Michigan. He has been involved in applying operations research and decision analysis methods to understand and influence a variety of operational phenomena, including military search and detection, criminal recidivism, manufacturing process monitoring, sequential allocation of re- sources, predictive and proactive maintenance, networks of queues, the stochastic behavior of infectious disease epidemics, and the optimization of radiation oncology plans. He has authored more than 60 technical papers; co-edited two books; and served as a consultant to more than 30 industrial, governmental, and service organizations. Professor Pollock was associate editor and area editor of Operations Research, senior editor of IIE Trans- actions, and associate editor of Management Science, and he served on the editorial boards of other journals. He has served on various advisory boards for NSF and on the Army Science Board. He was president of the Operations Research Society of America in 1986 and was awarded the 2001 INFORMS Kimball Medal for contributions to operations research and the management sciences. Professor Pollock is a fellow of INFORMS and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He was a member

OCR for page 319
327 APPENDIX E of the NRC’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Among other NRC activities, he chaired the Committee on National Statistics’ panel on Operational Test Design and Evaluation of the Interim Armored Vehicle, and he served on the panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems, the Committee on Technologies to Deter Cur- rency Counterfeiting, and the Panel on Methodological Improvements to the DHS Biological Agent Risk Analysis. He recently served on the NRC/ IOM committee on the Effectiveness of National Biosurveillance Systems: BioWatch and the Public Health System and is currently a member of the NRC/Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications (BMSA) committee on Mathematical Foundations of Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification. Reed V. Tuckson, M.D., FACP, is executive vice president and chief of medical affairs at UnitedHealth Group, a Fortune 25 diversified health and well-being company. He is responsible for working with all of the company’s business units to improve the quality and efficiency of health services. Formerly, Dr. Tuckson served as senior vice president, professional standards, for the American Medical Association (AMA). He is former president of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles, has served as senior vice president for programs of the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, and is a former commissioner of public health for the District of Columbia. Dr. Tuckson is an active member of the IOM and served as chairperson of its Quality Chasm Summit Committee and as a member of its Committee on the Consequences of the Uninsured. He is immediate past chair of the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society. Additionally, he recently served as commissioner, Certification Commission on Health In- formation Technology, and is currently a member of the Performance Mea- surement Workgroup, Ambulatory Care Quality Alliance, and the Quality Workgroup, American Health Information Community. Dr. Tuckson has also held other federal appointments, including serving on cabinet-level advisory committees on health reform, infant mortality, children’s health, violence, and radiation testing. He was featured on the cover of the Febru- ary 2009 issue of Black Enterprise magazine and named one of the 100 Most Powerful Executives in Corporate America. He was also selected as one of the 2009 Modern Healthcare/Modern Physician 50 Most Powerful Physician Executives in Healthcare. Last year, Dr. Tuckson was named one of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2008 and was on Ebony magazine’s 2008 Power 150: The Most Influential Blacks in America list. He is a graduate of Howard University, Georgetown University School of Medicine, and the Hospital of the University of Penn- sylvania’s General Internal Medicine Residency and Fellowship programs.

OCR for page 319
328 PREPOSITIONING ANTIBIOTICS FOR ANTHRAX Jeffrey S. Upperman, M.D., is director of trauma at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and associate professor of surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California’s Division of Pediatric Surgery. Dr. Upperman graduated from Stanford University in 1987 with a bachelor’s degree in human biology and a master’s degree in sociology. He earned his medical degree from New Jersey Medical School in 1991 and completed his surgical residency at the same institution. He completed his fellowship training in pediatric surgery at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and served on the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh until 2006, where he was interim direc- tor of the Benedum Pediatric Trauma Program in 2005. He was recruited to Childrens Hospital Los Angeles in January 2006 and assumed directorship of trauma in 2007. Dr. Upperman’s disaster and trauma research focuses on the organizational-level preparedness of health care workers, intestinal inflammation, sepsis, and pediatric trauma. His work has been funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institutes of Health, and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He publishes clinical work in the area of pediatric disaster preparedness, pediatric trauma, and computerized physician order entry. He is currently director of the Pedi- atric Disaster Resource and Training Center. Dr. Upperman has extensive experience in community involvement, serving on committees in national academic societies. He is a permanent member of the Pediatric Study Sec- tion at the National Institute of Child Health and Development. He serves his country as a U.S. Army reservist and saw combat duty during Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 in a region outside of Baghdad, Iraq.