Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of
Committee Members

Irva Hertz-Picciotto (Chair), is a professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, and at the Medical Investigations of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis, and is chief of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health. She also is deputy director of the Center for Children’s Environmental Health at UC Davis and director of the Northern California Center for the National Children’s Study. She has published widely on environmental exposures, including metals, pesticides, PCBs, and air pollution, and their effects on pregnancy, the neonate, and early child development, as well as on methods in epidemiologic research. In 2002, she turned her attention to identifying causes of autism, and launched the CHARGE Study (Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment) and subsequently the MARBLES Study (Markers of Autism Risk in Babies–Learning Early Signs). She has served or currently sits on editorial boards for the American Journal of Epidemiology, Environmental Health Perspectives, Epidemiology, and Autism Research. Dr. Hertz-Picciotto has served as president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. She has held appointments on the Carcinogen Identification Committee for the State of California, the scientific advisory boards/panels for the Environmental Protection Agency, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, National Toxicology Program, and National Institutes of Health Interagency Coordinating Committee on Autism Research. Dr. Hertz-Picciotto has also chaired two previous Institute of Medicine committees. She received a Ph.D. and an M.P.H. in epidemiology and an M.A. in biostatistics from UC Berkeley. Before



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Irva Hertz-Picciotto (Chair), is a professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, and at the Medical Investigations of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis, and is chief of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health. She also is deputy director of the Center for Children’s Environmen- tal Health at UC Davis and director of the Northern California Center for the National Children’s Study. She has published widely on environmental exposures, including metals, pesticides, PCBs, and air pollution, and their effects on pregnancy, the neonate, and early child development, as well as on methods in epidemiologic research. In 2002, she turned her attention to identifying causes of autism, and launched the CHARGE Study (Child- hood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment) and subsequently the MARBLES Study (Markers of Autism Risk in Babies–Learning Early Signs). She has served or currently sits on editorial boards for the American Journal of Epidemiology, Environmental Health Perspectives, Epidemiol- ogy, and Autism Research. Dr. Hertz-Picciotto has served as president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. She has held appointments on the Governor’s Carcinogen Identification Committee for the State of California, the sci- entific advisory boards/panels for the Environmental Protection Agency, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, National Toxicology Program, and National Institutes of Health Interagency Coordinating Com- mittee on Autism Research. Dr. Hertz-Picciotto has also chaired two previ- ous Institute of Medicine committees. She received a Ph.D. and an M.P.H. in epidemiology and an M.A. in biostatistics from UC Berkeley. Before 355

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356 BREAST CANCER AND THE ENVIRONMENT joining the faculty at UC Davis, Dr. Hertz-Picciotto was a professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Lucile Adams-Campbell joined the Georgetown University Lombardi Com- prehensive Cancer Center in 2008 as associate dean for Community Health and Outreach. Previously, she had served as director of the Howard Univer- sity Cancer Center for 13 years. She also serves as the co-principal inves- tigator for the Black Women’s Health Study. She focuses on community outreach and community-based participatory research, particularly cancer- related health disparities in minority populations, with an emphasis on can- cer prevention. Her research interests include understanding the biological basis of health disparities in those cancers that disproportionately affect minority and underserved populations via clinical trials; cancer epidemiol- ogy using minority cohorts; and behavioral epidemiology as it relates to physical activity and nutrition interventions. She aims to export prevention- based clinical trials and behavioral interventions targeting nutrition and exercise strategies to address obesity from the laboratory setting into the community. Dr. Adams-Campbell was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2008. She currently serves on the editorial board of or as a reviewer for eight journals. Dr. Adams-Campbell received an M.S. in biomedical science from Drexel University and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. She completed a National Institutes of Health-funded postdoc- toral fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh. Peggy Devine is the founder and president of Cancer Information and Sup- port Network, an organization that seeks to increase public awareness on all aspects of cancer, including the importance of cancer research. She served as the multisite advocate coordinator for the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) MRI/CALGB Correlative Science clinical trial (I SPY 1); is an advocate in the University of California, San Francisco Breast Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE); and is a research advocate consultant for many groups, including Los Alamos Laboratory, where she serves on a Department of Defense-funded team award grant, Breast Cancer: Catch It with Ultrasound, 2011–2015. Ms. Devine has served as a trainer for advocacy and professional associations, including the Ameri- can Society of Clinical Oncology Gastrointestinal Cancer, Summit Series on Clinical Trials Advocate Training, American College of Surgeons Oncology Group, ACRIN, and Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups. Ms. Devine also sits on many advisory boards, including the National Cancer Institute’s Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Steering Committee for a grant entitled “Research Studies in Cancer and Normal Pre-Analytical Variables and Their Effects on Molecular Integrity,” 2010–2014. Ms. Devine

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357 APPENDIX B has also reviewed grants for the Department of Defense, the National Can- cer Institute, Avon, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the California Breast Cancer Research Program. Ms. Devine has a B.S. in chemistry and biologi- cal science from Michigan State University. She then completed a year of training in clinical laboratory science at Huntington Memorial Hospital and holds federal and state licensure in that field. David Eaton is associate vice provost for research and a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the School of Public Health of the University of Washington. He is also the director of the Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health at the University of Washington. He joined the faculty of the University of Washington in 1979. Dr. Eaton’s research and teaching focus on the molec- ular basis for environmental causes of cancer, and how human genetic dif- ferences in biotransformation enzymes may increase or decrease individual susceptibility to chemicals found in the environment. He has served as presi- dent of the Society of Toxicology and as a member of the board of trustees of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Eaton has served on several committees for the National Academy of Sciences, most recently chairing the Committee for Review of the Federal Strategy to Address Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials. He received his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in toxicology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. S. Katharine Hammond is a professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences in the School of Public Health of the University of Califor- nia, Berkeley. Her research interests focus on health effects of exposure to airborne materials, including responses of asthmatic children to short-term fluctuations in particulate air pollution, neurologic and reproductive effects of hexane on workers, secondhand smoke, and the effects of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on asthmatic children and users of coal in China. She has received the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s Alice Hamilton Award for Excellence in Occupational Safety and Health and the American Industrial Hygiene Association’s Rachel Carson Environmental Award. Dr. Hammond currently serves on the Sci- entific Review Panel on Toxic Air Contaminants for the California Envi- ronmental Protection Agency and has served as a consultant to the Science Advisory Board of the Environmental Protection Agency. She is also a member of the World Health Organization’s Tobacco Product Regulation Study Group. She has served on numerous committees for the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. Dr. Hammond received a

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358 BREAST CANCER AND THE ENVIRONMENT Ph.D. in chemistry from Brandeis University and an M.S. in environmental health sciences from the Harvard School of Public Health. Kathy J. Helzlsouer is the director of the Prevention and Research Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. She is also an adjunct pro- fessor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Helzlsouer’s work focuses on clinical epidemiology, cancer epidemiology, and cancer prevention. In 2008, Dr. Helzlsouer was named chair of the Maryland State Council on Cancer Control. She also is chair-elect of the Molecular Epidemiology Group (MEG) of the American Association for Cancer Research. She serves on the Physician Data Query (PDQ) Cancer Screening and Prevention Committee of the National Cancer Institute, and she is a member of the advisory board for the AARP Cohort Study. Dr. Helzlsouer holds an M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and an M.H.S. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. She is board certified in medical oncology. Robert A. Hiatt is professor and chair of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He is the director of Population Sciences and associate director of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Hiatt holds adjunct appointments at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health and the Division of Research at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. He has been the principal investigator for the Bay Area Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Center for the past 7 years and now leads the Coordinating Center for the national program that continues to explore the influence of environmental factors on pubertal maturation as a window to understanding the causes of breast cancer. From 1998 to early 2003, Dr. Hiatt was the first deputy director of the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), where he oversaw cancer research in epidemiology and genetics, surveillance, and health services research. Before then he was the director of Prevention Sciences at the Northern California Cancer Cen- ter and also assistant director for epidemiology at the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in Northern California. He is board certified in preventive medicine and, until taking his NCI position, practiced general internal medicine. He is a past president of the American College of Epidemiology and the American Society for Preventive Oncol- ogy. Dr. Hiatt received an M.D. from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. Chanita Hughes Halbert is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Center

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359 APPENDIX B for Community-Based Research and Health Disparities. She is also direc- tor of the Community Diversity Initiative at the Abramson Cancer Center and associate director for Community Engagement in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. Dr. Hughes Halbert’s research focuses on understanding the sociocultural underpinnings of cancer prevention and control behaviors among ethnically diverse populations and translating this knowledge into interventions designed to reduce ethnic and racial differ- ences in cancer morbidity and mortality. She is principal investigator (PI) of an academic–community partnership funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities and the National Cancer Institute to develop and evaluate interventions for cancer prevention and control in community settings. She is also PI of grants funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute to identify barriers and facilitators of Afri- can American participation in cancer genetics research and to understand the long-term psychological and behavioral impact of genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. She earned her Ph.D. in personality psy- chology from Howard University. In addition to her doctoral training, Dr. Hughes Halbert completed pre- and postdoctoral training at the Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University. David J. Hunter is the dean for Academic Affairs and Vincent L. Gregory Professor in Cancer Prevention in the Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition in the Harvard School of Public Health. His principal research interests are the etiology of cancer—particularly breast, prostate, and skin cancer. He was an investigator on the Nurses’ Health Study, a long-running cohort of 121,000 U.S. women, and a project director for the Nurses’ Health Study II, a newer cohort of 116,000 women. He also analyzes inherited susceptibility to cancer and other chronic diseases using molecu- lar techniques and studies molecular markers of environmental exposures. Dr. Hunter was the director for the Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention and was co-director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Special Initiative. He is the director of the Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, and co-chair of the NCI Breast and Prostate Can- cer Cohort Consortium. Dr. Hunter received his M.P.H. and Sc.D. from Harvard University. He earned his M.B., B.S. from the University of Sydney. Barnett (Barry) Kramer is editor-in-chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) and of the Screening and Prevention Editorial Board of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Physician Data Query (PDQ). He was the associate director for disease prevention and head of the Office of Disease Prevention in the Office of the Director at the National Institutes of Health from 2001 to 2010. Previously, he served as the director of the

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360 BREAST CANCER AND THE ENVIRONMENT Office of Medical Applications of Research (OMAR), a component of the Office of Disease Prevention. He has also previously served as deputy direc- tor of NCI’s Division of Cancer Prevention. Dr. Kramer received his M.D. from the University of Maryland Medical School and is board certified in internal medicine and medical oncology. He received an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Bryan M. Langholz is a professor of research in the Division of Biosta- tistics and a visiting professor in the department of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC). He also is a research adjunct professor in the USC Department of Mathematics and a member of the Children’s Oncology Group. Dr. Lang- holz’s research interests are cohort sampling methods, statistical methods in epidemiology and occupational health, and statistical methods in genetic epidemiology. Additionally, he has done biostatistics research in pesticides and cancer, electromagnetic fields and cancer, radiation and cancer, and genetic and environmental factors in type 1 diabetes. Dr. Langholz is cur- rently a co-principal investigator on a National Cancer Institute-funded study examining the link between ultraviolet exposure and melanogenesis. Dr. Langholz is a member of the American Statistical Association, the International Biometrics Society, the International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and the International Society of Clinical Biostatistics. He has served as a reviewer for 28 journals and was an associate editor for Biometrics. Dr. Langholz previously served on the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides: First Biennial Update. Dr. Langholz received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in bio- mathematics from the University of Washington. Peggy Reynolds is a senior research scientist at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California, a consulting professor for the Department of Health Research and Policy in the Stanford University School of Medicine, and a member of the Stanford Cancer Center. Dr. Reynolds spent several years as an epidemiologist for the California Tumor Registry and San Francisco Bay Area SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) program, and previously served as the chief of the Environmental Epidemiology Section in the California Department of Health Services. Over the years, she has con- ducted a number of cancer epidemiology studies, with a concentration on environmental risk factors. Her research currently focuses on female breast cancer and cancers in children. She was a founding member of the Califor- nia Teachers Study (CTS), an ongoing prospective study of 133,479 women established in 1995. Dr. Reynolds was a co-investigator for an influential multicenter study on the risk of lung cancer from secondhand smoke. She and her research team further pursued the role of secondhand smoke and

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361 APPENDIX B breast cancer in a more detailed assessment of reported lifetime exposures in the CTS. In addition, Dr. Reynolds has served as principal investigator for a study of regional variations in breast cancer in California, a study of body burden levels of endocrine disruptors in breast cancer patients, a study of breast cancer in young women, studies of breast cancer incidence in flight attendants and cosmetologists, a study of malignant melanoma among Lawrence Livermore Laboratory employees, and a statewide study of patterns of childhood cancer. Dr. Reynolds earned a Ph.D. in epidemiol- ogy from the University of California, Berkeley. Joyce S. Tsuji is a principal scientist within the Center for Toxicology and Mechanistic Biology of the Health Sciences practice of Exponent. She is a board-certified toxicologist and a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. She has conducted risk assessment and toxicology studies in the United States and internationally for industry, trade associations, the Envi- ronmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies, the Department of Justice, the Australian EPA, municipalities, and private citizens. Dr. Tsuji’s experience includes human health and environmental toxicology related to metals and a wide variety of other chemicals in the environment. She has designed and directed dietary and environmental exposure studies and community programs involving health education and biomonitoring for populations potentially exposed to chemicals in the environment, includ- ing soil, water, and food-chain exposures. She has also assessed exposure and health risks associated with chemicals in air, foods, and a variety of consumer products. She has served on committees for several National Research Council (NRC) studies and is currently a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and the NRC Committee on Toxicology. Dr. Tsuji received a Ph.D. in environmental physiology and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in quantitative genetics at the Depart- ment of Zoology of the University of Washington. Cheryl Lyn Walker recently became a Welch Professor and director of the Institute of Biosciences and Technology of Texas A&M Health Science Center. Prior to this appointment, she was the Ruth and Walter Sterling Pro- fessor of Carcinogenesis at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, where she also directed the Center for Environmental and Molecu- lar Carcinogenesis of the Institute for Basic Science. Dr. Walker’s research interests include the genetic basis of susceptibility to cancer, specifically the interaction of environmental agents with genes during tumor development; the effects of endocrine disruptors on human health; and animal models for human disease. She also studies the molecular mechanisms of kidney, breast, and uterine cancers and the mechanisms by which environmental hormones reprogram the epigenome to increase susceptibility to these can-

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362 BREAST CANCER AND THE ENVIRONMENT cers. She has served on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sci- ences National Toxicology Program and is a past president of the Society of Toxicology. Dr. Walker received her Ph.D. from the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Texas Health Science Center, Southwest- ern Medical School (Dallas), and completed postdoctoral training at the National Institutes of Health. Lauren Zeise is chief of the Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assess- ment Branch of the California Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. She oversees or is involved in a variety of California’s risk assessment activities, including cancer and reproductive toxicant assessments; development of frameworks and meth- odologies for assessing toxicity, cumulative impact, nanotechnology, green chemistry/safer alternatives, and susceptible populations; the California Environmental Contaminant Biomonitoring Program; and health risk char- acterizations for environmental media, food, fuels and consumer products. Dr. Zeise’s research focuses on human interindividual variability, dose response, uncertainty, and risk. She was the 2008 recipient of the Society of Risk Analysis’s Outstanding Practitioners Award. She has served on advisory boards and committees of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Technology Assessment, World Health Organization, and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dr. Zeise has also served on numerous National Research Council and Institute of Medicine committees and boards. Most recently, she was a member of the Commit- tee to Review EPA’s Title 42 Hiring Authority for Highly Qualified Scien- tists and Engineers, and the Committee on Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions. Dr. Zeise received a Ph.D. from Harvard University.