Appendixes A

Biosketches of Committee Members

DAVID A. SKIVEN, Chair, was a facilities management consultant and frequent adviser to federal agencies including the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. He was also codirector of the Engineering Society of Detroit Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving Michigan’s economy. Mr. Skiven retired as the executive director of the General Motors Corporation Worldwide Facilities Group in 2007. The Worldwide Facilities Group was responsible for providing facilities management, utilities, construction, and environmental services, allowing General Motors (GM) clients to focus on their core businesses; this resulted in structural cost savings and improved use of assets. In 42 years at GM, Mr. Skiven worked in various engineering and plant operations, including as manager of facilities and future programs—manufacturing engineering for the Saturn Corporation and as director of plant environment and the environmental energy staff, before being appointed executive director of the Worldwide Facilities Group in 1993. Mr. Skiven served as a member of the National Research Council Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, on the board of directors of BioReaction, Inc., and on the board of the Engineering Society of Detroit. He had a BS in mechanical engineering from General Motors Institute and an MS degree from Wayne State University. Mr. Skiven was also a registered professional engineer. He was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Advancing the Productivity and Competitiveness of the U.S. Construction Industry.

GET W. MOY, Vice Chair, is a vice president of AECOM—a global design, management, and technical services company—and program director for AECOM’s Federal Emergency Management Agency Public Assistance Technical Assistance Contract. Before joining AECOM, Dr. Moy served as an engineer for various



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Appendix A Biosketches of Committee Members DAVID A. SKIVEN, Chair, was a facilities management consultant and frequent adviser to federal agencies including the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. He was also codirector of the Engineering Society of Detroit Institute, a nonprofit organi­ zation dedicated to improving Michigan’s economy. Mr. Skiven retired as the executive director of the General Motors Corporation Worldwide Facilities Group in 2007. The Worldwide Facilities Group was responsible for providing facilities management, utilities, construction, and environmental services, allowing General Motors (GM) clients to focus on their core businesses; this resulted in structural cost savings and improved use of assets. In 42 years at GM, Mr. Skiven worked in various engineering and plant operations, including as manager of facilities and future programs—manufacturing engineering for the Saturn Corporation and as director of plant environment and the environmental energy staff, before being ap- pointed executive director of the Worldwide Facilities Group in 1993. Mr. Skiven served as a member of the National Research Council Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, on the board of directors of BioReaction, Inc., and on the board of the Engineering Society of Detroit. He had a BS in mechanical engineering from General Motors Institute and an MS degree from Wayne State University. Mr. Skiven was also a registered professional engineer. He was a mem- ber of the National Research Council Committee on Advancing the Productivity and Competitiveness of the U.S. Construction Industry. GET W. MOY, Vice Chair, is a vice president of AECOM—a global design, man- agement, and technical services company—and program director for AECOM’s Federal Emergency Management Agency Public Assistance Technical Assistance Contract. Before joining AECOM, Dr. Moy served as an engineer for various 117

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118 PREDICTING OUTCOMES OF INVESTMENTS IN FEDERAL FACILITIES sectors of the federal government, including the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and the Department of Defense (DOD). As director of utilities and energy in the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Installations and Environment), he was responsible for DOD’s energy program, where he offered insight on such issues as the security of utility infrastructure, the role of distributed generation and renewable energy, energy and water-resource manage- ment, utility acquisition, and utilities privatization. As the director of installations requirements and management at DOD, he was responsible for the administration and direction of installations worldwide. Dr. Moy has managed complex programs for the federal government, including projects with stringent energy and environ- mental mandates. He was the recipient of the U.S. 2007 Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Service. He received the National Institute of Building Sciences President’s Award, which is presented to persons who have substantially improved the building process through government service. He is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of the United States Naval Institute, the Society of American Military Engineers, and the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society. Dr. Moy is a graduate of the Naval War College. He received a BS in civil engineering from the Catholic University of America and a master’s degree and doctorate of science degree in engineering administration from the George Washington University. MICHAEL A. AIMONE is vice president for strategy development for Battelle Memorial Institute’s National Security Global Business. In that capacity, he leads energy and infrastructure strategy and market planning for Battelle’s world-class science and technology support of the U.S. military services, defense agen- cies, and other federal clients engaged in the vital mission of national security. Mr. Aimone is a former member of the Senior Executive Service and retired from the U.S. Air Force after 39 years of combined military and civilian service. While with the Air Force, he was responsible to the chief of staff for leadership, manage- ment, and integration of Air Force civil engineering, logistics readiness, supply, transportation, and aircraft and missile maintenance. BURCU AKINCI is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at C ­ arnegie Mellon University. Her research is focused primarily on information technologies and the development of formalized model-based approaches for analysis of construction projects. Her work involves developing models to capture building-related data over time to support decision-making during construction planning and execution and facility management. She collects data by using emerging sensing and data-capture technologies. Dr. Akinci is a coauthor of n ­ umerous articles in peer-reviewed journals, including “Technological assess- ment and process implications of field data capture technologies for construction and facility/infrastructure management,” “Tracking components and maintenance history within a facility utilizing radio frequency identification technology,” and

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APPENDIX A 119 “Capturing and representing construction project histories for estimating and d ­ efect detection.” She holds a BS in civil engineering from Middle East Technical University in Turkey and an MS and a PhD in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University. ALFREDO H-S. ANG is a research professor and professor emeritus at the Uni- versity of California, Irvine. Since 1988, he has also been a professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UICC), where he received his PhD and was on the civil engineering faculty from 1959 through 1988. He re- ceived his BS in civil engineering from the Mapua Institute of Technology and an MS in structural engineering from UICC. Dr. Ang has published about 400 papers and articles and a two-volume textbook on probability concepts in engineering. He is active in several engineering societies particularly the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), in which he served as an international director on the Board of Directors from 1998 to 2001. He is the ASCE representative to the Asian Civil Engineering Coordinating Council and a member of the International Activities Committee. He is also a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, a founding member of the International Association for Structural Safety and Reli- ability, honorary president of the International Association for Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, and a member of several other professional and scientific societies. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976 for developing practical and effective methods of risk and reliability approaches to the formula- tion of engineering safety and design structural criteria. JOSEPH BIBEAU is the president of Eagle Enterprises of Tennessee, LLC, a com- pany that provides consulting services for business organizational development, including real-estate property management and investment. Before joining Eagle Enterprises, Mr. Bibeau was the group director for energy and utility services for the Worldwide Facilities Group at General Motors (GM). In that position, he was responsible for utility procurement, engineering, conservation, powerhouse, and wastewater treatment operations for GM North America (GMNA), and he coordi- nated energy and utility activity for GM worldwide. He managed an annual bud- get of $850 million, 800 GM employees, and more than 200 contract engineers. During his tenure, GMNA reduced its water consumption by 46 percent and its energy consumption by 30 percent on a volume-adjusted basis; this amounted to an annual savings of $25 million for water and $215 million for energy. Earlier in his career, Mr. Bibeau was the superintendent of maintenance, facilities, and con- trols for Saturn Corporation and manufacturing director for a startup automobile assembly plant in Gujarat, India. He holds a BS degree in mechanical engineering from Kettering University and attended California State University’s master’s of business administration program.

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120 PREDICTING OUTCOMES OF INVESTMENTS IN FEDERAL FACILITIES IVAN DAMNJANOVIC is an assistant professor in the Zachry Depart- ment of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University. His research focuses on ­ onstruction-project development, finance and management and analytical c m ­ odels to support decision-making. His teaching interests are in construction- project management, contracting, operations-research methods, engineering economics, real options, and project finance. Dr. Damnjanovic is investigating construction-project complexities related to financial feasibility, energy con- servation, environmental protection, and natural hazards mitigation. He holds a degree from the University of Nis, Serbia, and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. LUCIA E. GARSYS is the deputy county administrator for development and infrastructure for Hillsborough County, Florida. She manages 1,800 employees and a $550 million, 6-year capital program. She is responsible for managing the life cycle of transportation, stormwater, water, and wastewater systems and more than 500 government facilities, including fire stations, libraries, parks, courts, and office buildings. Ms. Garsys directed initiatives to create a preservation and maintenance program for facilities. She is identifying alternative ways of deliver- ing local government services in an effort to consolidate and eliminate facilities. Ms. Garsys has 30 years of public-sector and private-sector experience, includ- ing capital and asset management, planning, fiscal-impact analysis, development and redevelopment using tax-increment financing and organizational and process improvement. She is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners. Ms. Garsys served on the National Research Council Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment from 2004 to 2009 and on the Committee on Busi- ness Strategies for Public Capital Investment. She holds a bachelor’s degree in city and regional planning from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of ­ llinois at Urbana-Champaign. I DANIEL F. GELDERMANN is a principal analyst at Calibre Systems, Inc., a firm specializing in management and technology services. Mr. Geldermann has more than 27 years of experience that includes directing all aspects of facilities-­ engineering management—planning, engineering, design, contracts, operations, maintenance, repair, construction, utilities, environmental, transportation, safety, real estate, historic properties, and family housing—at various locations in the United States, Asia, and Europe. In addition to his consulting experience, his expertise has been developed through a career as a U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps officer and as an associate director of facilities at a state university. Mr. Geldermann has managed facility-related organizational budgets, service- contract programs, construction-management projects, facilities planning, com- missioning services, and facilities operations. As a consultant, he has conducted numerous facility-management studies and reviews for agencies, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S.

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APPENDIX A 121 Army, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Mr. Geldermann is a registered professional engineer in Wisconsin and Virginia and a certified facility manager, and he holds a master facility executive certificate from the Building Owners and Management Institute. He is a past chair of the Society of American Military Engineers National Facilities Asset Management Committee. Mr. Geldermann holds a BS in civil engineering from Marquette University and an MS in financial management from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. MICHAEL R. GREENBERG is a professor, associate dean of the faculty, and director of the National Center for Neighborhood and Brownfields Redevelop- ment, and director of the National Transportation Security Center of Excellence at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Dr. Greenberg studies environmental health and neighborhood redevelopment policies. His books include Urbaniza- tion and Cancer Mortality (1983), Hazardous Waste Sites: The Credibility Gap (1984), Public Health and the Environment (1987), Environmental Risk and the Press (1987), Environmentally Devastated Neighborhoods in the United States (1996), The Reporter’s Environmental Handbook (2003), and Environmental Policy Analysis & Practice (2008). He has been a member of National Research C ­ ouncil committees that focus on waste management, such as the destruction of the U.S. chemical-weapons stockpile and nuclear weapons. He has received awards for research from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Society of Professional Journalists, the Public Health Association, the Association of Ameri- can Geographers, and the Society for Risk Analysis. He serves as associate editor for environmental health for the American Journal of Public Health and is editor- in-chief of Risk Analysis: An International Journal. Dr. Greenberg holds a BA from Hunter College and an MA and a PhD from Columbia University. WILLIAM G. STAMPER is a consultant and chief executive officer of CBC Solu- tions, Inc., a facilities-management consulting firm. He retired from the federal government in 2007 as the deputy assistant secretary for facilities management and policy at the Department of Health and Human Services. In that capacity, he reestablished an office to lead departmental efforts related to real property, facil- ity engineering, environmental management, historic-preservation, headquarters operations, security, and safety. During his government career, Mr. Stamper also worked at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in a vari- ety of positions, including headquarters facility program manager for a variety of NASA centers, national aeronautics facility manager, and program manager for the $2.6 billion National Wind Tunnel Program; he finished his tenure as NASA’s deputy director of facilities. Early in his career, Mr. Stamper worked at the Air National Guard (ANG), where he was responsible for planning, project develop- ment and approval, and submission of the ANG military construction budget to the Office of Management and Budget and Congress.

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122 PREDICTING OUTCOMES OF INVESTMENTS IN FEDERAL FACILITIES ERIC TEICHOLZ is president and founder of Graphic Systems, Inc., a Cambridge, ­ Massachusetts, firm specializing in facility management and real-estate automa- tion consulting, system integration, market research, education, and publishing. He is a fellow of the International Facility Management Association (IFMA’s highest honor), a member of the IFMA Foundation’s Board of Trustees, chair of IFMA’s Sustainability Committee, coeditor of the International Journal of Facility ­Management, and a member of the Facility Maintenance and Operations Commit- tee at the National Institute of Building Sciences. Mr. Teicholz has helped orga- nizations to define and implement technology for more than 25 years. He lectures internationally and is the author of hundreds of articles on computer graphics, facility management, computer-aided design and architecture, computer-aided facilities management and geographic information system technology. He is also the author or editor of 11 books on those subjects. Mr. Teicholz was educated as an architect at Harvard University. Before founding Graphic Systems, he spent 12 years at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design as an associate professor of architecture and associate director of Harvard’s largest research and development facility, the Laboratory for Computer Graphics and Spatial Analysis. DONALD R. UZARSKI has been on the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign (UIUC) civil-engineering faculty since 1994. He retired in 2004 from the U.S. Army Engineering Research and Development Center-Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL) after 20 years of service. At ERDC-CERL, Dr. Uzarski conducted research to develop the science of facilities asset management, including modeling the decision-making process, determin- ing the data required to support decisions, establishing business rules to support the process, creating new metrics to measure condition and performance, and performing necessary analyses. He served as a principal investigator and project manager for research efforts in railroad-track and building-asset management. He also served as a technical consultant in those fields to the U.S. Army and the U.S. Navy. Before his ERDC-CERL career, he served in various public-works assign- ments as a U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps officer. Dr. Uzarski earned his BS, MS, and PhD in civil engineering from the University of Illinois. He is the author of more than 70 papers, reports, and articles on the various aspects of infrastructure (railroads, roads, and buildings) asset management. Dr. Uzarski is a member of the editorial advisory board for the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Journal of Infrastructure Systems and an active member of ASCE, the American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association (AREMA), and the National Research Council Transportation Research Board (TRB). He serves or has served on several national committees for ASCE, AREMA, and TRB and is a past chair of the ASCE Infrastructure Asset Management Committee. He is a registered professional engineer in Illinois and Pennsylvania.